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1.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9928276, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582875

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global public health crisis. However, whether it can cause respiratory dysfunction or physical and psychological disorders in patients remains unknown. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the respiratory function, activities of daily living, quality of life, and mental status of patients with COVID-19. Participants and outcomes. Data was collected from the follow-up of eligible patients who attended the fever clinic of three hospitals in Jiangxi Province, from March to May 2020. The outcomes included respiratory muscle function, degree of dyspnea, aerobic capacity, activities of daily living, quality of life, and mental status. Results: A total of 139 patients (72 men and 67 women) were included in this study. The proportions of mild, moderate, severe, and critical cases of COVID-19 were 7.1% (10 cases), 68.3% (95 cases), 20.1% (28 cases), and 4.2% (6 cases), respectively. The rates of abnormal maximal inspiratory pressure were 10.0%, 25.2%, 25.0%, and 16.7%, respectively. There were 50%, 65.3%, 50%, and 66.7% of the patients with abnormal dyspnea in the four clinical classifications, respectively. Patients generally show a decline in quality of life, anxiety, and depression symptoms. Conclusions: Respiratory dysfunction, decreased quality of life, and psychological disorders were present in each clinical classification of COVID-19. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out respiratory rehabilitation and psychological intervention for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Respiratory Mechanics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/rehabilitation , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Depression/rehabilitation , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
2.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 31-38, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are two to four times more prevalent in people with CF (pwCF) than the general population. COVID-19 may exacerbate mental health challenges, increasing demand for psychological services, while decreasing their availability. We assessed the impact of the pandemic on depression and anxiety in pwCF, including how COVID-19 affected the frequency of mental health screening and the types of services provided. METHODS: A 38-item internet survey, completed in June 2020, assessed how COVID-19 affected: 1) the mental health clinician's role and screening processes; 2) barriers to screening and resource needs; 3) impact of COVID-19 on depression and anxiety, and 4) positive outcomes and confidence in sustaining mental health screening and treatment, including telehealth services, after the pandemic. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 131 of the 289 US CF programs. Overall, 60% of programs (n=79) continued mental health screening and treatment, although less frequently; 50% provided individual tele-mental health interventions, and 9% provided telehealth group therapy. Clinically elevated depression symptoms (PHQ-9≥10; moderate to severe), were found in 12% of 785 pwCF, with 3.1% endorsing suicidal ideation. Similarly, elevated anxiety (moderate to severe; GAD-7≥10) was found in 13% of pwCF (n=779). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic created an opportunity to implement innovative solutions to disruptions in mental health screening and treatment in CF programs. We found that pwCF had increased access to psychological interventions during the pandemic via telehealth, supporting the continued integration of tele-mental health screening and treatment into CF care.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Depression , Mental Health , Psychosocial Intervention , Telemedicine , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Needs Assessment , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychosocial Intervention/trends , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
3.
Nephrology (Carlton) ; 27(2): 190-194, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455640

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-Cov-2) resulting in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is documented to have a negative psychosocial impact on patients. Home dialysis patients may be at risk of additional isolating factors affecting their mental health. The aim of this study is to describe levels of anxiety and quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic among home dialysis patients. This is a single-centre survey of home dialysis patients in Toronto, Ontario. Surveys were sent to 98 home haemodialysis and 43 peritoneal dialysis patients. Validated instruments (Haemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 Item [GAD7] Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9], Illness Intrusiveness Ratings Scale, Family APGAR Questionnaire and The Self Perceived Burden Scale) assessing well-being were used. Forty of the 141 patients surveyed, participated in September 2020. The mean age was 53.1 ± 12.1 years, with 60% male, and 85% home haemodialysis, 80% of patients rated their satisfaction with dialysis at 8/10 or greater, 82% of respondents reported either "not at all" or "for several days" indicating frequency of anxiety and depressive symptoms, 79% said their illness minimally or moderately impacted their life, 76% of respondents were almost always satisfied with interactions with family members, 91% were never or sometimes worried about caregiver burden. Among our respondents, there was no indication of a negative psychosocial impact from the pandemic, despite the increased social isolation. Our data further supports the use of home dialysis as the optimal form of dialysis.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Hemodialysis, Home , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Peritoneal Dialysis , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Hemodialysis, Home/methods , Hemodialysis, Home/psychology , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Peritoneal Dialysis/methods , Peritoneal Dialysis/psychology , Psychology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Am J Med Genet A ; 188(1): 71-82, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427048

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic increased anxiety and stress and prevented access to health care worldwide; it is unclear how COVID-19 affected adults with a multisystem genetic disorder such as neurofibromatosis (NF). An anonymous online survey was distributed through an international registry and foundations to adults with NF (June-August 2020) to assess the impact of the pandemic on mental health and NF health care. Six hundred and thirteen adults (18-81 years; M = 45.7) with NF1 (77.8%), NF2 (14.2%), and schwannomatosis (7.8%) provided complete responses. Respondents rated moderate-to-high amounts of worry about the impact of COVID-19 on their emotional (46.3%) and physical health (46.7%), and 54.8% endorsed moderate-to-high pandemic-related stress. Adults with diagnosed/suspected mental health disorders or moderate-to-severe NF symptom impact as well as females endorsed higher COVID-19 stress (ps < 0.01). Less than half who missed a doctor's appointment for their NF care (43.4%) used telehealth. Of these, 33.3% and 46.2% reported that telehealth met their needs to a moderate or high degree, respectively. Results indicated that subgroups of adults with NF experience higher COVID-19-related worries and stress and may need additional support. Furthermore, telehealth is under-utilized and could help NF providers connect with patients, although improved delivery and patient training may facilitate expanded use of these services.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Neurofibromatoses/psychology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neurofibromatoses/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
5.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211026409, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282203

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 has been spreading across the world since December 2019. The pandemic has created tremendous fear of death from infection and awful psychological pressure on healthcare professionals (HCPs). The measures of psychological effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on the Bangladeshi HCPs are unknown. The present study aimed to assess the mental health outcomes of Bangladeshi HCPs and associated risk factors. We conducted this cross-sectional study from July 15 to September 20, 2020. A total of 355 HCPs aged between 20 and 60 years residing in Bangladesh participated in this study. All the participants completed a self-administered questionnaire through Google Forms consisting of socio-demographic characteristics and mental health outcomes. We measure loneliness, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance using the UCLA loneliness scale-8, patient health questionnaire-9, 7-item generalized anxiety disorder scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index. The present study observed the prevalence of loneliness, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance among HCPs were 89%, 44%, 78%, and 87%, respectively. The factors significantly associated with the development of mental health problems among HCPs were working environment, economic condition, education level, area of residence, marital status, gender differences, professional category, body mass index, and smoking habit. Moreover, we have seen significant correlations among the different mental health outcomes. In Bangladesh, a large portion of HCPs reported mental health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 pandemic incredibly impacted the psychological health of Bangladeshi healthcare professionals. Appropriate supportive programs and interventional initiatives might help the HCPs with mental health problems during and after this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211026121, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277844

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the psychological well-being of healthcare professionals, among them, on medical and nursing occupational specialists. This study describes the psychological distress that this group has suffered, analyzing the effect that the sense of coherence related with the history of contact with infected people has generated in their mental health. Cross-sectional descriptive study using online questionnaires. Data were collected on a sample of 499 subjects, representing 42.0% and 38.8% of the associations of specialists in Occupational Medicine and Nursing, respectively. A univariate data analysis, independence test, and the CHAID multivariate method were carried out. The percentage of workers with high psychological distress was higher among women than among men; this was also higher in public sector workers than in the private sector. No differences have been observed regarding psychological distress and educational level, coexistence, having children, working away from home, having a pet, or between being a physician or nurse. The most efficient measure to prevent psychological distress was acting regarding the comprehensibility dimension of the sense of coherence. Sex, contact with any infected person, age, living as a couple, working in public or private centers, the availability of diagnostic tests, and the correlation with the manageability dimension were modulating factors. Sense of coherence is an effective measure to prevent psychological distress due to contact with people affected by COVID-19 in Occupational Health professionals.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Sense of Coherence , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211025873, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277843

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused dramatic changes in the daily lives of Romanians, affecting their mental health. The COVID-19 pandemic has evolved at three significant peaks, which sequentially occurred on: April 29, 2020; September 18, 2020; and the third wave registered the highest severity on November 27, 2020. Little is known about the mental health changes during this phase of this pandemic. This study evaluated mental health levels in Romania at the end of the first wave of the pandemic and amidst the third and most severe wave. We administered a two-phase internet-based survey among 543 and 583 participants, respectively, recruited through snowball sampling at a 6-month interval. The IPAT Anxiety Scale measured anxiety, the Beck's Depression Inventory measured depression, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale measured dissociation. We observed no statistically significant differences in the number of participants with clinically relevant scores at either time point. In the first survey, 23.8%, 19.2%, and 32.6% reported being clinically anxious, clinically depressed, and showed clinical dissociation, respectively. Binary logistic regressions indicated that age, education level, and previous traumatic events were significantly associated with clinical levels of anxiety and depression. Moreover, multiple linear regression analysis reported a collective significant effect of gender, age, psychological impact, traumatic events, and dissociation on predicting high levels of anxiety and depression. Romanian adults' mental health status was affected during the COVID-19 pandemic, and it did not change 6 months after the first lockdown.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Manifest Anxiety Scale , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Romania/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology
8.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 6(1): 41, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247609

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has considerably heightened health and financial concerns for many individuals. Similar concerns, such as those associated with poverty, impair performance on cognitive control tasks. If ongoing concerns about COVID-19 substantially increase the tendency to mind wander in tasks requiring sustained attention, these worries could degrade performance on a wide range of tasks, leading, for example, to increased traffic accidents, diminished educational achievement, and lower workplace productivity. In two pre-registered experiments, we investigated the degree to which young adults' concerns about COVID-19 correlated with their ability to sustain attention. Experiment 1 tested mainly European participants during an early phase of the pandemic. After completing a survey probing COVID-related concerns, participants engaged in a continuous performance task (CPT) over two, 4-min blocks, during which they responded to city scenes that occurred 90% of the time and withheld responses to mountain scenes that occurred 10% of the time. Despite large and stable individual differences, performance on the scene CPT did not significantly correlate with the severity of COVID-related concerns obtained from the survey. Experiment 2 tested US participants during a later phase of the pandemic. Once again, CPT performance did not significantly correlate with COVID concerns expressed in a pre-task survey. However, participants who had more task-unrelated thoughts performed more poorly on the CPT. These findings suggest that although COVID-19 increased anxiety in a broad swath of society, young adults are able to hold these concerns in a latent format, minimizing their impact on performance in a demanding sustained attention task.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , Attention/physiology , COVID-19 , Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology , Psychomotor Performance/physiology , Adult , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , United States , Young Adult
9.
Asia Pac Psychiatry ; 13(2): e12406, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term closing of schools and home-quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic cause negative effects on the physical and mental health of young people. Studies evaluating the mental health of adolescents during the pandemic are limited in the literature. AIM: In our study, it was aimed to determine the results of home-quarantine measures taken for adolescents during the pandemic and the affecting factors. METHOD: This study was conducted as an online cross-sectional self-report questionnaire and included children aged between 12 and 18 years. The data were obtained from the children of volunteer families via Facebook family groups, and Google Forms questionnaires sent by the child psychiatry clinic to their smartphones. Sociodemographic form, State-Trait anxiety scale, and UCLA loneliness survey were used as data collection tools. RESULTS: We examined the data of 745 adolescents. The average age of the study group was 16.83 ± 1.66 years, and 69.5% were females. It was determined that 88.2% of the adolescents followed the developments in the COVID-19 process and obtained most information from the television. State anxiety was related to "Former psychiatric referral" by 4.39-fold, "Having a COVID positive patient in the family or your surroundings" by 3.81-fold, and "The most common medium for obtaining COVID-related information" by 2.41-fold. CONCLUSIONS: Closure of schools and home-quarantine during pandemic causes anxiety and loneliness in young people. The identification of risky groups helps to properly support these individuals by various social connections, including healthcare professionals, families, and schools.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Loneliness/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Turkey
10.
Psychoneuroendocrinology ; 129: 105269, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230717

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the relationship between competitive anxiety, fear/anxiety of COVID-19, and autonomic and endocrine stress responses in professional football players after returning to competition during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Ninety male professional football players (age: 26.33 ± 2.48 yr) volunteered to participate in this study, which included an official competition. Psychophysiological responses, including the Fear of COVID-19 Scale, the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 Revised, were collected 30 min before the competition. In addition, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) and salivary cortisol (sCort) were collected at 8 a.m. and 15 min before the competition. RESULTS: The main findings, based on the Pearson correlation, showed significant positive correlations between COVID-19 anxiety and somatic competitive anxiety (p = 0.01), cognitive competitive anxiety (p = 0.01), and competition response of sCort and sAA (p = 0.01). Moreover, fear of COVID-19 was positively correlated with COVID-19 anxiety (p = 0.01). On the contrary, the awakening response of sCort and sAA was not found to be correlated with psychological parameters (all p > 0.05). The analysis also indicated that there was no significant correlation between self-confidence with other psychological and physiological variables (all p > 0.05). The regression analysis showed that cognitive anxiety was a relevant predictor for the competition response of sCort and sAA (p < 0.05). Moreover, COVID-19 anxiety was the only predictor of somatic and cognitive anxiety (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides the first preliminary evidence that COVID-19 anxiety and competitive anxiety might pose a negative impact on the athletic performance of professional football players during COVID-19 pandemic competitions. Thus, research is needed to build a strategy to reduce the psychophysiological stress related to COVID-19 and competition response.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Athletes , COVID-19 , Competitive Behavior , Fear , Soccer , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/metabolism , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , Athletes/psychology , Fear/physiology , Fear/psychology , Humans , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Male , Saliva , Salivary alpha-Amylases/metabolism , Soccer/physiology , Soccer/psychology , Stress, Psychological/metabolism , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
11.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 268, 2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216450

ABSTRACT

Maternal stress has debilitating implications for both mother and child, including increased risk for anxiety. The current COVID-19 pandemic escalates these phenomena, thus, urging the need to further explore and validate feasible therapeutic options. Unlike the protracted nature of clinical studies, animal models could offer swift evidence. Prominent candidates for treatment are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to the mother, that putatively accommodate maternal functioning, and, thereby, also protect the child. However, SSRIs might have deleterious effects. It is important to assess whether SSRIs and other pharmacotherapies can moderate the transference of anxiety by soothing maternal anxiety and to examine the extent of offspring's exposure to the drugs via lactation. To our knowledge, the possibility that antenatal stress exacerbates lactation-driven exposure to SSRIs has not been tested yet. Thirty ICR-outbred female mice were exposed to stress during gestation and subsequently administered with either the SSRI, escitalopram, or the novel herbal candidate, shan-zha, during lactation. Upon weaning, both dams' and pups' anxiety-like behavior and serum escitalopram levels were assessed. The major findings of the current study show that both agents moderated the antenatal stress-induced transgenerational transference of anxiety by ameliorating dams' anxiety. Interestingly though, pups' exposure to escitalopram via lactation was exacerbated by antenatal stress. The latter finding provides a significant insight into the mechanism of lactation-driven exposure to xenobiotics and calls for a further consideration vis-à-vis the administration of other drugs during breastfeeding.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/physiopathology , Lactation/metabolism , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/prevention & control , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Animals , COVID-19 , Citalopram/administration & dosage , Citalopram/pharmacology , Citalopram/therapeutic use , Crataegus , Disease Models, Animal , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Female , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/pharmacology , Xenobiotics/metabolism
12.
Cogn Behav Ther ; 50(3): 246-260, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160475

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in dramatic changes to sleep patterns and higher prevalence of insomnia, which threaten overall mental and physical health. We examined whether safety behaviors in response to COVID-19, worry in response to COVID-19, and depression predicted insomnia, with age, race, and sex as covariates. A community sample from the United States (n = 321, Mage = 40.02, SD = 10.54; 53.6% female) recruited using online crowdsourcing completed self-report measures in May of 2020 and again three months later. At baseline, our model accounted for 68.1% of the variance in insomnia, with depression as the only significant predictor (ß = .70, p < .001). In the longitudinal analyses, only baseline insomnia symptoms predicted 3-month follow-up insomnia symptoms (ß = .70, p < .001; 67.1% of variance). Of note, COVID-19 worry and some COVID-19 safety behaviors were related to 3-month follow-up safety behaviors, but not insomnia. Our findings demonstrated that depression is an important factor to consider for concurrent insomnia symptoms. Our results have implications regarding the development of interventions for insomnia during the COVID-19 pandemic and suggest that clinicians should consider depression when assessing for and treating insomnia symptoms.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Self Report , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology
13.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 65: 103034, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141880

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of the first COVID-19 surge (March through June 2020) on mental well-being and associated risk factors among intensive care unit nurses. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: In September 2020, a nationwide cross-sectional survey study among Dutch intensive care nurses was carried out to measure prevalence rates of symptoms of anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and need for recovery (NFR), objectified by the HADS-A, HADS-D, IES-6 and NFR questionnaires, respectively. Associated risk factors were determined using multivariate logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Symptoms of anxiety, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder were reported by 27.0%, 18.6% and 22.2% of the 726 respondents, respectively. The NFR was positive, meaning not being recovered from work, in 41.7%. Working in an academic hospital, being afraid of infecting relatives and experiencing insufficient numbers of colleagues were associated with more mental symptoms, while having been on holiday was associated with reduced depression symptoms and need for recovery. CONCLUSION: The first COVID-19 surge had a high impact on the mental well-being of intensive care nurses, increasing the risk for drop out and jeopardising the continuity of care. Effort should be made to optimize working conditions and decrease workload to guarantee care in the next months of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Critical Care Nursing/trends , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/complications , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/physiopathology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Critical Care Nursing/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/standards , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(10): 783-787, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105012

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe nurses' mental health status during the Covid-19 outbreak and to explore the factors that might accentuate the negative consequences on their mental health. METHODS: We conducted an online survey to evaluate demographic variables, working conditions, family dynamics, and mental health variables in nurses working in healthcare settings, in Portugal, during the Covid-19 outbreak. RESULTS: Portuguese nurses presented higher depression, anxiety and stress levels, when compared to the Portuguese general population, during the outbreak. Overall, nurses who did not consider the quantity and quality of personal protective equipment as adequate presented significantly higher levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that nurses' mental health status seems to be particularly affected by the Covid-19 outbreak and that some modifiable elements might accentuate the impacts on their mental health.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/physiopathology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Portugal , Prevalence , Sex Factors
15.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0247280, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102383

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term clinical and physiological consequences of COVID-19 infection remain unclear. While fatigue has emerged as a common symptom following infection, little is known about its links with autonomic dysfunction. SARS-CoV-2 is known to infect endothelial cells in acute infection, resulting in autonomic dysfunction. Here we set out to test the hypothesis that this results in persistent autonomic dysfunction and is associated with post-COVID fatigue in convalescent patients. METHODS: We recruited 20 fatigued and 20 non-fatigued post-COVID patients (median age 44.5 years, 36/40 (90%) female, median time to follow up 166.5 days). Fatigue was assessed using the Chalder Fatigue Scale. These underwent the Ewing's autonomic function test battery, including deep breathing, active standing, Valsalva manoeuvre and cold-pressor testing, with continuous electrocardiogram and blood pressure monitoring, as well as near-infrared spectroscopy-based cerebral oxygenation. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was also conducted, and patients completed the generalised anxiety disorder-7 questionnaire. We assessed between-group differences in autonomic function test results and used unadjusted and adjusted linear regression to investigate the relationship between fatigue, anxiety, and autonomic test results. RESULTS: We found no pathological differences between fatigued and non-fatigued patients on autonomic testing or on 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. Symptoms of orthostatic intolerance were reported by 70% of the fatigued cohort at the time of active standing, with no associated physiological abnormality detected. Fatigue was strongly associated with increased anxiety (p <0.001), with no patients having a pre-existing diagnosis of anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the significant burden of fatigue, symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and anxiety in the aftermath of COVID-19 infection, but reassuringly do not demonstrate pathological findings on autonomic testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Anxiety/physiopathology , Autonomic Nervous System/pathology , Blood Pressure , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Electrocardiography , Fatigue/physiopathology , Heart Rate , Humans , Middle Aged
16.
Sleep Breath ; 25(4): 2197-2204, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080518

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the frequency of sleep and mood disturbances, and their association with COVID-like symptoms in healthcare workers (HCWs) with and without positive Coronavirus RT-PCR in a corona referral center. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey of adult HCWs. Data collection was performed in May and June 2020, while governmental restrictions were in place. The participants completed the forms including six separate parts: personal and occupational information, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), Patient's Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and COVID-like symptoms and Coronavirus RT-PCR status. RESULTS: Among the 372 HCW participants, 245 (66%) were women and  mean age was 34.5 ± 7.1 years (age range 23 to 58). The mean scores of all questionnaires except ISI were significantly higher in the HCWs with positive Coronavirus RT-PCR than another group (PSQI, 9 ± 3.4 vs. 6.9 ± 3.1; GAD-7, 9.8 ± 3.6 vs. 7.9 ± 5.3; PHQ-9, 12.8 ± 6.1 vs. 9.5 ± 6.4, P < 0.05; and ISI, 13.8 ± 5.3 vs. 12.3 ± 6 P = 0.163). Positive association between COVID-like symptoms and sleep and mood disturbances was found in the group without a positive test result. Analysis of questionnaires showed higher scores in the group directly involved except for ISI (P < 0.001 and P = 0.053 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the HCWs in this sample experienced a high rate of sleep and mood disturbances. There was also a strong association between sleep and mood disturbances and COVID-like symptoms in the group without a positive RT-PCR result. With all this considered, effective psychological support for HCWs during crisis seems to be necessary.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Depression/physiopathology , Personnel, Hospital , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Young Adult
18.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(11): 2487-2498, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071751

ABSTRACT

In light of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, we explore the role of stress, fear, and the impact of positive and negative emotions on health and disease. We then introduce strategies to help mitigate stress within the health care team, and provide a rationale for their efficacy. Additionally, we identify strategies to optimize patient care and explain their heightened importance in today's environment.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Fear/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Professional-Patient Relations , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Fear/physiology , Global Health , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Mental Health , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
20.
Arch Pediatr ; 28(2): 136-140, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064842

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Besides infectious pneumonia and death risks, the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted negative psychological impacts on communities, especially on people with chronic diseases. We aimed to evaluate COVID-19 and sickle cell disease (SCD)-related experiences, and the clinical course during the outbreak, to measure anxiety levels of adolescent and young adult patients with homozygous SCD, to analyze the correlations between their COVID-19 experiences and anxiety levels and painful episodes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 47 patients aged between 14 and 24 years responded to a descriptive instrument and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Clinical features requiring hospitalization for the same period (between March 10 and May 10) of two sequential years were compared. RESULTS: Sixty-six percent of the patients had at least one negative COVID-19 experience of dizziness, sleep disturbance, tonic immobility, appetite loss or nausea/abdominal distress. The number of negative COVID-19 experiences was correlated with the state anxiety score, the trait anxiety score, and the number of painful episodes (ρ=0.552, P<0.001; ρ=0.529, P<0.001; ρ=0.448, P=0.002, respectively). Both median state anxiety and trait anxiety scores were below the cut-off scores indicating significant clinical symptoms. The number of hospitalizations requiring vaso-occlusive crisis management and blood/exchange transfusion were similar for the same period of two sequential years, 2019 and 2020. CONCLUSION: These descriptive and correlation findings are the first reported on COVID-19-related anxiety in SCD patients. To develop screening and support strategies for mental health needs in pandemic times, further SCD studies should be conducted.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Sickle Cell/psychology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Adolescent , Anemia, Sickle Cell/physiopathology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Turkey , Young Adult
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