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1.
Trials ; 23(1): 451, 2022 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers represent one of the most affected categories by the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health. Excessive stress and anxiety are critical factors that could compromise work performance. Besides, high levels of stress and anxiety may have long-term physical and psychological consequences. Recent studies investigated virtual reality to reduce stress and anxiety among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the proposed virtual reality interventions have important limitations related to their location (i.e., research lab and hospitals) and content (i.e., virtual experiences only for relaxation). Within this context, this randomized controlled trial aims to investigate the efficacy and acceptability of a brief home-based virtual reality training for managing stress and anxiety during the COVID-19 crisis in a sample of Italian healthcare workers. METHODS: The study is a randomized controlled trial. It includes two groups of 30 individuals recruited from healthcare workers: (1) the experimental group and (2) the control group. Participants in the experimental group will receive a training consisting of three home sessions performed in a week. In each session, participants will try through an immersive virtual reality standalone system (i.e., Oculus Quest 2) a virtual psychoeducation experience on stress and anxiety (i.e., MIND-VR). Subsequently, they will try the virtual relaxation content (i.e., The Secret Garden). The control group will receive no training and will be reassessed one week and one month after the initial evaluation. DISCUSSION: If the proposed brief home-based virtual reality training will result helpful and easy to use, it could become an empirically assessed viable option for protecting healthcare workers' mental health both during the COVID-19 pandemic and once it will be over. Furthermore, the intervention might be easily adapted for other categories of people who need support in managing stress and anxiety. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04611399 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
2.
J Community Health Nurs ; 39(2): 71-89, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860584

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study was conducted to determine the effect of correct handwashing and mask-wearing training on COVID-19 fear and generalized anxiety in cardiac patients. METHODS: Randomized controlled experimental study with the formation of intervention and control groups. DESIGN: The study (triple-blind) was conducted between August 11 and November 17, 2020, in the cardiology clinic of a tertiary hospital in western Turkey. The pre-study sample size was calculated as a minimum 45 at 80% strength, 0.05 significance level, and 0.60 influence quantity for each group. 112 volunteers meeting the criteria were included in the study. The study was completed with a total of 105 individuals in the intervention group (n=50) and control group (n=53). The post-study strength was (1- ß) =1. This study was performed in five stages: (1) collection of data, (2) randomization, (3) providing training, (4) contacting the intervention and control groups for follow-up a month later, and (5) collection of the follow-up data. FINDINGS: The training provided to cardiac patients increased the correct handwashing technique (U=36.00; p<0.001) and the correct mask-wearing technique (U=99.00; p<0.001) and decreased COVID-19 fear (U=883.5; p<0.001) and anxiety (U=751.0; p<0.001) (p <.05). CONCLUSION: It can be considered that the training provided to the cardiac patients in preventing COVID-19 may also be suitable for other risk groups. CLINICAL EVIDENCE: Practical training at the individual level can be used to train cardiac patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fear , Hand Disinfection , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Acta Biomed ; 93(S2): e2022149, 2022 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1848022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Healthcare providers in the emergency first response units have been exposed to a considerable stress during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. This study was designed to identify the effects of listening to music during the work break compared to the routine break (in the absence of listening to music) on the level of state anxiety and on the vital parameters of the nurses on duty at the operations center. METHODS: Randomized, controlled, three-arm, double-blind, single-center clinical study. Healthcare providers were divided into three groups according to study intervention (Group 1: listening to 440Hz music; Group 2: listening to 432Hz music; Group 3: liberal activity). The study was conducted during the working hours of dayshifts in an emergency first response unit station located in Tuscany, Italy. Outcomes were measured against measures of stress (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAIX1), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), pain and productivity (Likert Scale) measured at baseline (T0) and at the end of exposure (T1). RESULTS: Overall, 54 healthcare providers were enrolled; 32 females (59.3%); mean age of 39.64 years (SD±9.94); the total measurements performed were 83. The median values of STAI X1 decreased in all the 3 groups from T0 to T1 (Group 1: 34.5 vs. 32, p=0.0001; Group 2: 34 vs. 29, p=0.001; Group 3: 33 vs. 31, p=0.028). In Group 2 a reduction of mean values of respiratory rate and systolic blood pressure was recorded at T1 (-2.714 b/min, p=0.000 and -3.821 mmHg, p=0.031, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Listening to music at 432 Hz is a low cost and short intervention that can be a useful resource to manage anxiety and stress. Further studies are needed to assess medium and long-term effects of listening to music.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music Therapy , Music , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Niger Postgrad Med J ; 29(2): 110-115, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835283

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus pandemic has influenced the working practice of health-care professionals who come across symptomatic and asymptomatic COVID patients in their day-to-day practice. Especially, among HCWs in otorhinolaryngology, with the risk of exposure being high, hence were mandated to use personal protective equipment (PPE). Materials and Methods: The change in perceptions and patterns of PPE use throughout the COVID-19 pandemic was studied in detail through interviews conducted among 15 key informants, and the data were analyzed using health belief model in our study. Results: A health belief model explains the trajectory of PPE use by otorhinolaryngology health care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The course of usage of PPE by otorhinolaryngology health-care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic was explained through the health belief model. During the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic, intense perceived severity and susceptibility to COVID infection led to PPE use, and otorhinolaryngology HCWs resorted to higher grade PPEs which gave optimal protection; but in course of time with a better understanding of the natural course of illness, minimal PPEs without compromising HCW safety were used with minimal discomfort. Perceived severity of COVID infection on self and family, health knowledge, influence of peers, and support from the institution encouraged them in using PPEs. Conclusion: We found that various aspects of health belief model such as the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity of the disease, perceived barriers and benefits in PPE use, self-efficacy, health-related knowledge, and the cues to action influence PPE use among otorhinolaryngology HCWs. The key findings can be applied in behavior change models to promote the use of PPE in the hospitals, especially during the time of pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Otolaryngology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Nigeria , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818133

ABSTRACT

Perinatal maternal anxiety and depression negatively affect intrauterine fetal development, birth outcome, breastfeeding initiation, duration, and milk composition. Antenatal classes potentially reduce the anxiety of pregnant women and may thus contribute to healthy infant development. The study investigates the relationship between participation in online or in-person antenatal classes and levels of anxiety and depression in Polish women during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study group included 1774 adult, non-smoking pregnant women. We compared the state anxiety (STAI-State) and depression levels (EPDS) in women who (i) attended antenatal classes in-person, (ii) attended online classes, and (iii) did not attend any of them. The statistical analyses included a GLM model and trend analysis, while controlling for maternal trait anxiety, age, pregnancy complications, trimester of pregnancy, previous pregnancies, and COVID-19 infections. We observed statistically significant differences in the level of anxiety (and depression). Women who did attend antenatal classes in person had the lowest levels of anxiety and depression. Considering the importance of maternal mental well-being on fetal development, birth outcome, and breastfeeding, in-person participation in antenatal classes should be recommended to pregnant women.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19 , Depression/etiology , Education, Distance , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Prenatal Education/methods , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Parturition/psychology , Poland/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Pregnancy Complications/prevention & control
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e054897, 2022 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774961

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of anxiety and depression in Indian adolescents are common. Schools can be opportune sites for delivery of mental health interventions. India, however, is without a evidence-based and integrated whole-school mental health approach. This article describes the study design for the safeguarding adolescent mental health in India (SAMA) project. The aim of SAMA is to codesign and feasibility test a suite of multicomponent interventions for mental health across the intersecting systems of adolescents, schools, families and their local communities in India. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Our project will codesign and feasibility test four interventions to run in parallel in eight schools (three assigned to waitlist) in Bengaluru and Kolar in Karnataka, India. The primary aim is to reduce the prevalence of adolescent anxiety and depression. Codesign of interventions will build on existing evidence and resources. Interventions for adolescents at school will be universal, incorporating curriculum and social components. Interventions for parents and teachers will target mental health literacy, and also for teachers, training in positive behaviour practices. Intervention in the school community will target school climate to improve student mental health literacy and care. Intervention for the wider community will be via adolescent-led films and social media. We will generate intervention cost estimates, test outcome measures and identify pathways to increase policy action on the evidence. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval has been granted by the National Institute of Mental Health Neurosciences Research Ethics Committee (NIMHANS/26th IEC (Behv Sc Div/2020/2021)) and the University of Leeds School of Psychology Research Ethics Committee (PSYC-221). Certain data will be available on a data sharing site. Findings will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journals and conferences.


Subject(s)
Depression , Mental Health , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Humans , India/epidemiology
7.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604430, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753425

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To examine the association of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) with anxiety and depressive symptoms among adults and determine if these associations varied by gender and age. Methods: We combined survey data from 16,177,184 adults from 43 countries who participated in the daily COVID-19 Trends and Impact Survey via Facebook with time-varying NPI data from the Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker between 24 April 2020 and 20 December 2020. Using logistic regression models, we examined the association of [1] overall NPI stringency and [2] seven individual NPIs (school closures, workplace closures, cancellation of public events, restrictions on the size of gatherings, stay-at-home requirements, restrictions on internal movement, and international travel controls) with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Results: More stringent implementation of NPIs was associated with a higher odds of anxiety and depressive symptoms, albeit with very small effect sizes. Individual NPIs had heterogeneous associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms by gender and age. Conclusion: Governments worldwide should be prepared to address the possible mental health consequences of stringent NPI implementation with both universal and targeted interventions for vulnerable groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Humans
8.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e050288, 2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745696

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to elicit the views of relevant stakeholders on the design of a device using simulated affective touch to reduce procedural anxiety surrounding radiotherapy and imaging. DESIGN: This qualitative study collected data from focus groups which were then analysed using inductive thematic analysis in line with Braun and Clarke's methods. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Twenty patients and carers were recruited, as well as 10 healthcare practitioners involved in either delivering radiotherapy or imaging procedures. RESULTS: Patients, carers and healthcare practitioners agreed on some aspects of the device design, such as ensuring the device is warm and flexible in where it can be used on the body. However, patient and healthcare practitioner cohorts had at times differing viewpoints. For example, healthcare practitioners provided professional perspectives and required easy cleaning of the device. Meanwhile patients focused on anxiety-relieving factors, such as the tactile sensation of the device being either a vibration or pulsation. There was no consensus on who should control the device. CONCLUSIONS: The desired features of a simulated affective touch device have been investigated. Different priorities of patients and their carers and healthcare practitioners were evident. Any design must incorporate such features as to appease both groups. Areas where no consensus was reached could be further explored, alongside including further patient and public involvement in the form of a project advisory group.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Touch , Anxiety/prevention & control , Diagnostic Imaging/psychology , Focus Groups , Humans , Qualitative Research , Radiotherapy/psychology
9.
Braz J Psychiatry ; 44(2): 136-146, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736578

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the adherence to a set of evidence-based recommendations to support mental health during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its association with depressive and anxiety symptoms. METHODS: A team of health workers and researchers prepared the recommendations, formatted into three volumes (1: COVID-19 prevention; 2: Healthy habits; 3: Biological clock and sleep). Participants were randomized to receive only Volume 1 (control), Volumes 1 and 2, Volumes 1 and 3, or all volumes. We used a convenience sample of Portuguese-speaking participants over age 18 years. An online survey consisting of sociodemographic and behavioral questionnaires and mental health instruments (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7]) was administered. At 14 and 28 days later, participants were invited to complete follow-up surveys, which also included questions regarding adherence to the recommendations. A total of 409 participants completed the study - mostly young adult women holding university degrees. RESULTS: The set of recommendations contained in Volumes 2 and 3 was effective in protecting mental health, as suggested by significant associations of adherence with PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores (reflecting anxiety and depression symptoms, respectively). CONCLUSION: The recommendations developed in this study could be useful to prevent negative mental health effects in the context of the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
10.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7964-7970, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608921

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to develop mental health nursing strategies for the inbound quarantined population based on the results of a survey study and frontline nursing experiences. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A mixed research method was selected, we collected data by questionnaires from 128 quarantined people, and by semi-structured interviews from 5 registered nurses. Generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7), the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) were used in the quantitative research to identify the prevalence of psychological issues and risk factors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the qualitative study to conclude nursing experiences from RNs. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia were 34%, 41%, and 18% respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that social support, urban residence, and chronic disease were associated with mental health problems in certain aspects. Three themes were emerged from the analysis of RNs interviews: personality, chronic diseases, and social support. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of mental health issues in the inbound quarantined population was the same as the general population in the initial stage of COVID-19 outbreak, and significantly lower than people who lived in high-risk areas. Living in urban areas, with chronic diseases, and obtaining less social support are the risk factors. Finally, four nursing strategies were proposed by the research team for mental health well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/organization & administration , Psychiatric Nursing/organization & administration , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Professional Role , Quarantine/standards , Risk Factors , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/prevention & control , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Social Support/psychology , Social Support/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
11.
J Neuroinflammation ; 19(1): 2, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603365

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental illnesses in the U.S. and are estimated to consume one-third of the country's mental health treatment cost. Although anxiolytic therapies are available, many patients still exhibit treatment resistance, relapse, or substantial side effects. Further, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home order, social isolation, fear of the pandemic, and unprecedented times, the incidence of anxiety has dramatically increased. Previously, we have demonstrated dihydromyricetin (DHM), the major bioactive flavonoid extracted from Ampelopsis grossedentata, exhibits anxiolytic properties in a mouse model of social isolation-induced anxiety. Because GABAergic transmission modulates the immune system in addition to the inhibitory signal transmission, we investigated the effects of short-term social isolation on the neuroimmune system. METHODS: Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were housed under absolute social isolation for 4 weeks. The anxiety-like behaviors after DHM treatment were examined using elevated plus-maze and open field behavioral tests. Gephyrin protein expression, microglial profile changes, NF-κB pathway activation, cytokine level, and serum corticosterone were measured. RESULTS: Socially isolated mice showed increased anxiety levels, reduced exploratory behaviors, and reduced gephyrin levels. Also, a dynamic alteration in hippocampal microglia were detected illustrated as a decline in microglia number and overactivation as determined by significant morphological changes including decreases in lacunarity, perimeter, and cell size and increase in cell density. Moreover, social isolation induced an increase in serum corticosterone level and activation in NF-κB pathway. Notably, DHM treatment counteracted these changes. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that social isolation contributes to neuroinflammation, while DHM has the ability to improve neuroinflammation induced by anxiety.


Subject(s)
Flavonols/pharmacology , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Microglia/drug effects , Microglia/metabolism , Social Isolation/psychology , Animals , Anxiety/metabolism , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , Flavonols/therapeutic use , Male , Maze Learning/drug effects , Maze Learning/physiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL
12.
Midwifery ; 105: 103229, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately one-fifth of pregnant women suffer from anxiety and/or depression. These mental health conditions are associated with increased infant and maternal morbidity. Relaxation massage has the potential to improve mental health and may provide a vaulable option for pregnant women. This paper reports on participants' experiences of partner delivered massage as a technique to manage mild antenatal anxiety. METHODS: We conducted a feasibility study with 44 pregnant women who self-assessed as mildly anxious. The women were randomised into massage therapy (14 women/partner dyads) or to an active control group (13 women). 4-6 weeks after the birth of their baby, massage group participants were invited to be interviewed about their experiences; twelve women and four partners agreed. The qualitative data was analysed using reflective thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four themes emerged from the data; Supporting mental health, Connecting, Useful and adaptable and Making it happen. Partner delivered massage was an accessible and practical method to manage mild anxiety for pregnant women in this study. The massage program also provided useful skills for participants to apply in their lives after the birth of their child, which has the potential to continue to support maternal mental health as well as partner connection. CONCLUSION: Partner delivered massage offers low-cost, accessible option for pregnant women to manage their mild anxiety. These findings have particular relevance in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, where anecdotal reports indicate that antenatal stress is increasing and women may have limited access to healthcare services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/prevention & control , Depression , Female , Humans , Male , Massage , Parturition , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 646-650, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579387

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the mental health problems and countermeasures of college students under the background of epidemic prevention and control. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 286 students in school were investigated with self-designed social demographic questionnaire, epidemic cognitive behavior, epidemic panic and anxiety questionnaire, depression symptom group scale, heart-filling scale and emotion regulation self-efficacy scale. RESULTS: College students have a certain understanding of COVID-19 transmission routes, preventive measures, etc., and can actively cooperate and understand the country's epidemic prevention measures. The average score of the College Student Anxiety Self-Rating Scale is (55.37±6.13) points. The total score of students' emotional regulation self-efficacy is 64.32±10.61, the total score of expressing positive emotions is 24.17±3.55, and the total score of managing negative emotions is 39.69±7.71. Under the epidemic situation, the degree of bad emotions such as panic, anxiety and depression is lower. CONCLUSIONS: The mental health status of college students is on the decline. According to the demographic characteristics and anxiety sources of different students, more social support and targeted and personalized intervention measures should be given to promote their positive mental state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
14.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(12): e14839, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556315

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the anxiety levels of parents with children aged 3-6 years because of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to examine the effects of Solution-Focused Support Program (SFSP) applied to parents with a high level of anxiety. METHODS: The study was conducted as a parallel-group, randomised controlled design. The sample of the study consisted of 77 parents who were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups (control group n = 40; intervention group n = 37). One session of online SFSP was applied to the intervention group each week and 4 sessions were applied in total. No intervention was applied to the control group. The data were collected using introductory information form and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) programme and Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) 23 application were used in the analysis of the data. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to examine a hypothesised model that SFSP has both direct and indirect effects on the anxiety levels of parents. RESULTS: The state and trait anxiety mean scores of the intervention group decreased compared with the pre-intervention mean scores after the implemented programme. While this difference between state anxiety scores was statistically significant (P ≤ .001), the difference between trait anxiety scores was not statistically significant (P > .05). There was no statistically significant difference between the pre-test and post-test STAI total scores of the control group. CONCLUSIONS: In the study, it has been found that SFSP applied to parents with a high level of anxiety is an effective method in reducing the state anxiety levels of parents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 76: e2631, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534495

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic brought a work and stress overload to healthcare workers, increasing their vulnerability to mental health impairments. In response, the authors created the COMVC-19 program. The program offered preventive actions and mental health treatment for the 22,000 workers of The Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HCFMUSP). This paper aims to describe its implementation and share what we have learned from this experience. METHODS: Workers were able to easily access the program through a 24/7 hotline. Additionally, a mobile phone app that screened for signs and symptoms of emotional distress and offered psychoeducation and/or referral to treatment was made available. Data from both these sources as well as any subsequent psychiatric evaluations were collected. RESULTS: The first 20 weeks of our project revealed that most participants were female, and part of the nursing staff working directly with COVID-19 patients. The most frequently reported symptoms were: anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances. The most common diagnoses were Adjustment, Anxiety, and Mood disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Implementing a mental health program in a multimodal intervention was feasible in a major quaternary public hospital. Our data also suggests that preventive actions should primarily be aimed at anxiety and depression symptoms, with a particular focus on the nursing staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Brazil/epidemiology , Depression , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(10): 10591-10599, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the epidemic, the mental health of college students was generally poor, especially anxiety and depression, which should be treated using counseling and intervention. This study aimed to observe the influence of dialectical behavior therapy on the anxiety and depression of medical students during the normalization of the prevention and control of the COVID-19 epidemic. METHODS: A total of 26 medical students (experimental group) were treated with dialectical behavior therapy intervention for 4 weeks. Changes in depression, anxiety, and stress levels were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale, the Somatic Self-rating Scale (SSS), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10). This group was compared with 26 medical students (control group) without intervention. RESULTS: The value-added scores of the PHQ-9 (t=2.543, P=0.014) and GAD-7 scales (t=3.790, P=0.000) in the experimental group were significantly higher than those in the control group, while in the SSS scale, the value-added score of the depressive symptoms subscale (t=2.234, P=0.030) in the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group. For the total score of the PSS-10 scale (t=2.435, P=0.018), the value-added score of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention of dialectical behavior therapy can effectively alleviate the depression and anxiety of medical students during the normalization of epidemic prevention and control. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR2100048784.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dialectical Behavior Therapy , Epidemics , Psychotherapy, Group , Students, Medical , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety Disorders/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488546

ABSTRACT

Internet media may exacerbate public confusion and anxiety about COVID-19. New media health literacy (NMHL) is considered to play a protective role against health-related misinformation from the media for individuals to maintain their health. The current study aims to examine the relationship among Taiwanese adults' NMHL, health status, anxiety, and prevention behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This cross-sectional study was conducted through an online survey, and 342 responses were included in the analysis. The survey tools include Health Status, COVID-19-Related New Media Health Literacy, COVID-19 Anxiety, and COVID-19 Preventive Behaviors. The research showed that both functional and critical prosuming literacy had positive relationships with health status. Functional consumption literacy had a weak negative correlation with COVID-19 anxiety. Furthermore, critical consumption literacy had a positive relationship with COVID-19 preventive behaviors. Therefore, individuals' health, anxiety, and prevention behaviors are affected by different aspects of COVID-19-related new media health literacy. Compared to their consuming media literacy, Taiwanese adults have insufficient prosuming media literacy in regard to COVID-19 health issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan/epidemiology
18.
Trials ; 22(1): 645, 2021 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypermobility is a poorly recognised and understood musculoskeletal disorder thought to affect around 20% of the population. Hypermobility is associated with reduced physiological and psychological functioning and quality of life and is a known risk factor for the development of an anxiety disorder. To date, no evidence-based, targeted treatment for anxiety in the context of hypermobility exists. The present intervention (ADAPT-Altering Dynamics of Autonomic Processing Therapy) is a novel therapy combining bio-behavioural training with cognitive approaches from clinical health psychology targeting the catastrophisation of internal sensations, with aim to improve autonomic trait prediction error. METHOD: Eighty individuals with diagnosed hypermobility will be recruited and the efficacy of ADAPT to treat anxiety will be compared to an Emotion-Focused Supportive Therapy (EFST) comparator therapy in a randomised controlled trial. The primary treatment target will be post therapy score on the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and secondary outcomes will also be considered in relation to interoception, depression, alexithymia, social and work adjustment, panic symptoms and dissociation. Due to COVID restrictions, the intervention will be moved to online delivery and qualitative assessment of treatment tolerance to online therapy will also be assessed. DISCUSSION: Online delivery of an intervention targeting anxiety would improve the quality of life for those experiencing anxiety disorder and help to reduce the £11.7 billion that anxiety disorders cost the UK economy annually. TRIAL REGISTRATION: World Health Organization ISRCTN17018615 . Registered on 20th February 2019; trial protocol version 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Joint Instability , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/prevention & control , Humans , Joint Instability/diagnosis , Joint Instability/therapy , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
19.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 28(2): 352-357, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1431260

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Introduction. The pandemic SARS-Cov-2 outbreak necessitated the implementation of changes in everyday obstetric attendance, which demands continuity of care. Employment of sudden changes in obstetric attendance could have increased anxiety among medical personnel. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the Communication was to analyse the influence of professional experience on the level of anxiety in a group of midwives during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis included 100 midwives: average professional experience: 11.51 years (max. 36; median 7,5; SD: 10.37; p<0.0001). The largest group of respondents was employed in a tertiary referral hospital (n = 40), the smallest in a medical clinic (n = 7). A preliminary study using an online questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Screener (GAD-7), posted on Internet fora, Facebook fan pages of The Childbirth with Dignity Foundation, and the Foundation for Midwives, using the Snowball sampling method. The Ethics Committee for Research Projects at the Institute of Psychology, University of Gdansk, approved the research project (Approval No. 35/2020). RESULTS: The average score was 9.390 (max. 21, median 8.5; SD; 5.228). The length of professional experience did not correspond to the level of anxiety (r = -0.0097; p = 0.9237). In 20 respondents, no anxiety was traced, while the smallest group indicated severe anxiety (n = 15). Professional experience did not influence the level of anxiety in either group with different level of anxiety (ANOVA test; p = 0.465). . CONCLUSIONS: Professional experience did not influence the level of anxiety. In order to prevent exacerbation of anxiety symptoms, different factors which may playa vital role in enhancing the level of anxiety must be analysed.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Midwifery , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Protective Factors , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 37(1): 228-241, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409431

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the number of individuals infected with the COVID-19 has been increasing worldwide, posed a substantial threat to mental health. Therefore, discovering the means for blocking the transmission path of COVID-19 and improving mental health is of great significance. Based on a survey on the life of urban and rural residents in China (in 2020), the study applied the least squares method to analyse the effect of closed-off management on the psychological anxiety and psychological stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, the bootstrap decomposition method was used to test for the mediating effects of satisfaction with and confidence in pandemic prevention. The study found that closed-off management in communities exerted a negative effect on psychological anxiety and stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, satisfaction with and confidence in pandemic prevention played a mediating role on the psychological anxiety and stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, closed-off management in communities will not only prevent the spread of the COVID-19, but also improve satisfaction with and confidence in pandemic prevention and control. Furthermore, it will alleviate the psychological anxiety and stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Depression , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
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