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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-COVID affects over 144 million people globally. In the absence of treatments, there is a need to establish the efficacy of therapies that improve patient outcomes. Forest bathing has been demonstrated to improve physical and mental outcomes but there is no evidence in Long-COVID patients. Accordingly, this pilot study sought to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of online forest bathing in adults with Long-COVID. METHODS: Feasibility was assessed by monitoring retention rates and participant feedback. In a waitlist controlled, repeated measures design, 22 Long-COVID patients completed weekly online surveys during a four-week waitlist control period, before engaging in four weekly online forest bathing sessions, completing post-intervention surveys following each session. RESULTS: In terms of retention, 27% did not provide post-intervention data, reasons for non-adherence were: feeling too ill, having medical appointments, or having career responsibilities. Compared with the waitlist control period, there were statistically significant improvements in Anxiety (49% decrease), Rumination (48% decrease), Social Connection (78% increase), and Long-COVID symptoms (22% decrease). Written qualitative comments indicated that participants experienced feelings of calm and joy, felt more connected socially and with nature, and experienced a break from the pain and rumination surrounding their illness. CONCLUSIONS: Online Forest bathing resulted in significant improvements in well-being and symptom severity and could be considered an accessible and inexpensive adjunct therapy for Long-COVID patients. Where people have limited access to in-person nature, virtual nature may offer an alternative to improve health and well-being outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Pilot Projects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Anxiety/therapy , Forests
2.
Trials ; 23(1): 942, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of COVID-19, NHS Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and other children's mental health services have faced major challenges in providing psychological treatments that (i) work when delivered remotely and (ii) can be delivered efficiently to manage increases in referrals as social distancing measures have been relaxed. Anxiety problems are a common reason for referral to CAMHS, children with pre-existing anxiety problems are particularly vulnerable in the context of COVID-19, and there were concerns about increases in childhood anxiety as schools reopened. The proposed research will evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a brief online parent-led cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) delivered by the OSI (Online Support and Intervention for child anxiety) platform with remote support from a CAMHS therapist compared to 'COVID-19 treatment as usual' (C-TAU) in CAMHS and other children's mental health services throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We will conduct a two-arm, multi-site, randomised controlled non-inferiority trial to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of OSI with therapist support compared to CAMHS and other child mental health services 'COVID-19 treatment as usual' (C-TAU) during the COVID-19 outbreak and to explore parent and therapists' experiences. DISCUSSION: If non-inferiority is shown, the research will provide (1) a solution for efficient psychological treatment for child anxiety disorders while social distancing (for the COVID-19 context and future pandemics); (2) an efficient means of treatment delivery as 'normal service' resumes to enable CAMHS to cope with the anticipated increase in referrals; and (3) a demonstration of rapid, high-quality evaluation and application of online interventions within NHS CAMHS to drive forward much-needed further digital innovation and evaluation in CAMHS settings. The primary beneficiaries will be children with anxiety disorders and their families, NHS CAMHS teams, and commissioners who will access a potentially effective, cost-effective, and efficient treatment for child anxiety problems. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN ISRCTN12890382 . Registered prospectively on 23 October 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Pandemics , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Parents/psychology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , United Kingdom , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 527-535, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents' anxiety and depression during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak cannot be ignored. In public health crisis events, adolescents are prone to negative psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression. Hence, this research focuses on the use of reasonable and efficient methods to intervene in adolescents' psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: From February to April 2020, we conducted an anonymous online survey on a total of 1,200 adolescents in the provinces of Hunan and Guangxi in China. Moreover, we randomly divided a total of 150 middle school students with anxiety scores greater than 50 and volunteered to participate in the intervention experiment into control and intervention groups, with 75 members in each group. On the basis of the proposed routine treatment, we conducted 8 weeks of model 328-based peer education intervention in the intervention group. RESULTS: After the intervention, the self-rating anxiety scale scores (SAS) of the intervention group are better than those of the control group (P<0.001). Moreover, the self-rating depression scale (SDS) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group (P<0.001) than on the control group. Finally, the total Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group than on the control group (P=0.001 and <0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Model 328-based peer education intervention can significantly reduce the level of anxiety and depression in adolescents and improve their sleep quality.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , China , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
4.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 634-638, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the effect of social work intervention on psychological intervention of medical workers after the epidemic under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy". SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The observation objects in this study were all medical workers in fever clinic under the epidemic situation in COVID-19. A total of 60 cases were selected, and the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers in fever clinic was investigated by electronic questionnaire. After completing the investigation, social work intervention measures under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" were implemented. RESULTS: After implementation, the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers were significantly lower than those before intervention (P<0.05). The development of music therapy activities has alleviated the job anxiety of medical workers to a great extent, and the job anxiety test, total score and scores of various factors have all decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Social work intervention under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" can relieve anxiety and depression, and ensure the mental health of frontline medical staff during the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music Therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Work
5.
Trials ; 23(1): 899, 2022 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had major impacts in many different spheres, including mental health. Children and adolescents are especially vulnerable because their central nervous system is still in development and they have fewer coping resources than do adults. Increases in the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptomatology have been reported worldwide. However, access to mental health care is limited, especially for the paediatric population and in low- and middle-income countries. Therefore, we developed a brief internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural intervention for children and adolescents with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The aim of this proposed study is to test the efficacy of the intervention. METHODS: We will conduct a two-arm, parallel randomised controlled trial involving children and adolescents (8-11 and 12-17 years of age, respectively) with symptoms of anxiety, depression or both, according to the 25-item Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (t-score > 70). A total of 280 participants will be randomised to the intervention group or the active control group, in a 1:1 ratio. Those in the intervention group will receive five weekly sessions of cognitive-behavioural therapy via teleconference. The sessions will focus on stress responses, family communication, diaphragmatic breathing, emotions, anger management, behavioural activation and cognitive restructuring. Participants in both groups will have access to 15 videos covering the same topics. Participant-guardian pairs will be expected to attend the sessions (intervention group), watch the videos (control group) or both (intervention group only). A blinded assessor will collect data on symptoms of anxiety, depression and irritability, at baseline, at the end of the intervention and 30 days thereafter. Adolescents with access to a smartphone will also be invited to participate in an ecological momentary assessment of emotional problems in the week before and the week after the intervention, as well as in passive data collection from existing smartphone sensors throughout the study. DISCUSSION: Internet-delivered interventions play a major role in increasing access to mental health care. A brief, manualised, internet-delivered intervention might help children and adolescents with anxiety or depressive symptomatology, even outside the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05139433. Registered prospectively in November 2021. Minor amendments made in July 2022.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Internet-Based Intervention , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , Cognition , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/therapy , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
6.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 564-571, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081404

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has put enormous stress on the health care workers, threatening not only their physical health but also their mental well-being. No mental health support program (MHSP) addressing depression and anxiety in healthcare workers (HCWs), has been shown to be effective in Turkey previously. We aimed to measure the effect of our MHSP among healthcare workers who applied for psychological help associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: An MHSP has been created for healthcare professionals working in a pandemic hospital during the COVID-19 period. Health workers were recruited between July and September 2020. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia levels were evaluated with HAM-A (Hamilton Anxiety Scale), HDRS (Hamilton Depression Scale), and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) before and after the intervention. Sexual complaints were questioned by a consultant psychiatrist. MHSP (n=31), and treatment as usual (TAU, n=27) groups were compared using repeated-measures ANOVA. RESULTS: Sociodemographic data, medical history of COVID-19, and psychiatric diagnoses were similar between the groups. There was no difference in baseline HAM-A, HDRS, and ISI scores (p>0.05). At the end of the study, there was a significant difference between study groups regarding anxiety scores (For post-treatment, MHSP=8.0±2.6 vs. TAU=17.9±3.1, p<0.001) and depression symptoms (For post-treatment, MHSP=8.8±2.7 vs. TAU=20.0±2.4, p<0.001) but not in insomnia levels (For post-treatment, MHSP=6.5±2.4 vs. TAU=7.3±2.4, p=0.499). Likewise, both groups reported similar levels of improvement in reduced sexual drive. CONCLUSIONS: Our study results suggest that the MHSP effectively alleviates the psychiatric complaints of healthcare professionals. It is recommended to have mental support teams for healthcare professionals in hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Depression/psychology , Turkey/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals , Delivery of Health Care
8.
J Affect Disord ; 319: 437-445, 2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the global pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have commonly occurred among COVID-19 patients, whose experiences of infection and subsequent treatment might develop negative consequences on their mental well-being even after recovery. Despite the general recognition of efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions in reducing psychological distress among various populations, there were insufficient studies on the relationship between mindfulness and mental health among individuals who have recovered from COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to identify the prevalence of common mental health challenges among recovered COVID-19 patients in Jianghan District, Wuhan, China and to explore the potential mechanism through which mindfulness alleviate depression and PTSD. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey on mental health was conducted among a convenience sample of adults recovered from COVID-19 in Jianghan District, Wuhan, China. The study participants completed questionnaires under the assistance of trained investigators. The questionnaire included Chinese version of Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire-Short Form (FFMQ-SF), Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-7), Resilience Style Questionnaire (RSQ), Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to measure mindfulness, anxiety, resilience, PTSD, and depression respectively. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship between mindfulness and mental health outcomes of this population. RESULTS: 1541 respondents (654 [42.4 %] men and 887 [57.6 %] women) completed the questionnaire between June 10 and July 25, 2021, of whom 36.2 % and 27.1 % had mild and severe levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms respectively, and 15.2 % was indicated with PTSD. The average score of mindfulness of the study participants was (3.100 ± 0.387), and that of resilience was (3.560 ± 0.877). The structural equation model fit the data well, demonstrating that mindfulness was negatively associated with depressive symptoms directly (ß = -0.031, P = 0.021) or indirectly through the mediation effect of resilience (ß = -0.019, P = 0.009) and anxiety symptoms (ß = -0.208, P < 0.001), and was negatively associated with PTSD through the mediation effect of anxiety symptoms (ß = -0.142, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 commonly experienced psychological distress. Mindfulness is associated with alleviation of depressive and PTSD symptoms directly or indirectly. Interventions based on mindfulness are suggested to improve the mental well-being of this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Adult , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , China/epidemiology
9.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 41: 271-276, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041575

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing students experienced mental symptoms when they switched to distance education due to the pandemic. AIMS: This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of online laughter therapy sessions on depression, anxiety, stress, and loneliness levels in first-year nursing students. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 61 healthy nursing students were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 32) and control groups (n = 29). The intervention group received online laughter therapy twice weekly for four weeks. The control group received no intervention. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale at the study initiation and week four in both groups. RESULTS: There was no difference between the mean scores of the groups in the pre-test (p > 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of depression after online laughter therapy sessions (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between anxiety, stress, and loneliness levels (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Online laughter therapy sessions significantly reduced depression but had no effect on anxiety, stress, and loneliness. During the COVID-19 pandemic, online laughter therapy can be organized to reduce depression levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laughter Therapy , Students, Nursing , Humans , Loneliness , Pandemics , Depression/therapy , Anxiety/therapy
10.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 41: 341-347, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031123

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore anxiety, sleep quality, and mindfulness of frontline nurses at the initial epicenter of the pandemic, to examine the mediating effects of mindfulness. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 was first identified in Wuhan, China in January 2020. Nurses were at the forefront of care and treatment across hospitals in response to the pandemic. METHODS: Single site cross-sectional survey conducted in Wuhan province (China) between March and April in 2020. Quantitative analysis of survey data from N118 nurses working in the frontline COVID response. Questionnaires included: The general information questionnaire, the Self-Anxiety Scale, the Short Inventory of Mindfulness, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. RESULTS: Front-line nurses' anxiety was positively associated with sleep quality and mindfulness was negatively associated with anxiety and sleep quality. Mindfulness had a mediating role on anxiety and sleep quality, with intermediary adjustment effects (ES = 0.136, 95 % CI 0.02 to 0.26), accounting for 21.9 % of the total effect ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety causes a reduction in sleep quality and mindfulness can help with anxiety. Mindfulness strategies may help during periods of higher anxiety in the workplace; however, other factors must be considered. Further research is required on strategies for assisting nurses during periods of extreme anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Sleep Quality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sleep/physiology , Anxiety/therapy , China
11.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(8): e443-e451, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029125

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This retrospective study investigated the benefits of adding psychological services for frontline workers with delayed recovery from COVID-19 due to psychosocial stressors and/or mental disorders. METHODS: Both standardized psychological evaluation and at least 3 sessions of work-focused cognitive behavioral therapy were provided to 103 participants. Benefits were assessed by comparing the pretreatment and posttreatment recovery, work status, and self-ratings of work-related and adaptive daily functioning. RESULTS: Duration of recovery and return to work were reduced along with improvements in work relevant (40%) and adaptive functioning (31%). The majority (80%) returned to work within 12 weeks despite variable presenting problems, course of illness, demographic, and job factors. CONCLUSIONS: Brief work-focused cognitive behavioral therapy seems to be an effective adjunct to customary outpatient medical care for COVID-19 in frontline essential workers for whom the return-to-work process may be negatively affected by stress, anxiety, and depressed mood.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Clin Neurophysiol ; 139: 106-113, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the impact of the Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on seizure frequency in persons with epilepsy with a Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS) system implanted. METHODS: Weekly long episode counts (LEC) were used as a proxy for seizures for six months pre-COVID-19 and during the COVID-19 period. Telephone surveys and chart reviews were conducted to assess patient mental health during the pandemic. The change in LEC between the two time periods was correlated to reported stressors. RESULTS: Twenty patients were included. Comparing the pre-COVID-19 period to the COVID-19 period, we found that only 5 (25%) patients had increased seizures, which was positively correlated with change in anti-seizure medications (ASM, p = 0.03) and bitemporal seizures (p = 0.03). Increased seizures were not correlated to anxiety (p = 1.00), depression (p = 0.58), and sleep disturbances (p = 1.00). The correlation between RNS-detected and patient-reported seizures was poor (p = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS: Most of our patients did not have an increase in seizures following the COVID-19 pandemic. Changes in ASM and bitemporal seizures were positively correlated to increased LEC. There was no correlation between pandemic-related stress and seizures in those found to have increased seizures. SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study correlating RNS-derived objective LECs with patient self-reports and potential seizure risk factors during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Anxiety/therapy , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/therapy
13.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 36(5): E48-E56, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992377

ABSTRACT

Evidence has been found of how the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has increased stress and anxiety indicators. Against this background, the present research aims to determine the effect of a distance Reiki intervention program on stress and anxiety during the period of isolation due to COVID-19 among people working in the city of Lima, Peru. The related hypothesis was that distance Reiki would generate a reduction in stress and anxiety levels. It was a quasiexperimental design with pre- and posttests, with nonprobabilistic purposive sampling. In total, 28 employees participated (12 in the experimental group and 16 in the control group). As part of the method, the following instruments were used: the EPGE, IDARE, and Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS). There was a large decrease in the distress parameter (Cohen's d = 1.006), as well as in the state anxiety parameter (d = 1.678) and a large increase in eustress (d = 0.921). Similarly, there was an overall reduction in the trait anxiety parameter (d = 0.373) in all cases as compared with the control group. Coronavirus anxiety showed no major impact. These results provide initial evidence on the effects of distance Reiki among Peruvians and provide the basis for promoting this cost-effective therapy, generating a practical and social contribution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Therapeutic Touch , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Therapeutic Touch/methods
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1979252

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immersive therapy through virtual reality represents a novel strategy used in psychological interventions, but there is still a need to strengthen the evidence on its effects on health professionals' mental health. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results of immersive therapy through virtual reality on the levels of anxiety and well-being of the health professionals working in a regional hospital in Olot (Spain). METHODS: Pilot quasi-experimental study including a group of 35 female (mean age = 45.7, SD = 8.43) health professionals who undertook immersive therapy for 8 weeks. The intervention was implemented through virtual reality, and its effect on anxiety levels and well-being was evaluated through the Hamilton and Eudemon scales, respectively. Data on age, gender, active pharmacological or psychological treatment, mental health disorders and number of sessions were also collected. RESULTS: A statistically significant (p < 0.001) improvement in anxiety and well-being was found, with large and moderate effect sizes (0.90 and 0.63 respectively). In addition, these changes were clinically significant. No significant associations were found between the improvements and the different variables, but a greater trend was identified among the group of professionals with untreated or unidentified levels of anxiety. CONCLUSION: This group of health professionals showed a statistically and clinically significant improvement in anxiety and well-being after the application of immersive therapy using virtual reality. Further studies with a control group are necessary to further analyze this novel intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pilot Projects
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e061405, 2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973844

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Living with heart failure (HF), is a shared journey and arduous work for patients and their informal family caregivers. Given the key role and limited evidence of dyad illness management in improving dyad health in the context of HF, we developed a customisable, relationship focused, family online dynamic disease management programme-FOCUS programme-to improve dyad health for HF patients and their informal caregivers in China. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Based on the Theory of Dyadic Illness Management and the Systemic Transactional Model of Stress and Coping, the family customised online FOCUS programme has five modules: (1) family participatory; (2) open communication; (3) coping effectiveness; (4) uncertainty reduction and 5) shared dyad life stories. HF family dyads will be recruited in the cardiology wards of four university-affiliated hospitals in China. The dyads (N=142) will be randomly allocated to the intervention group that will receive the family customised online FOCUS programme, and the attention control group that will not receive elements of the FOCUS programme. Dyadic coping, HF somatic perception, self-care, anxiety and depression for patients and family caregivers and all-cause mortality and hospital admission for patients will be measured at baseline, 4 weeks (after the discharge, T1), 12 weeks (after the discharge, T2) and 24 weeks (after the discharge, T3). Statistical analysis will be performed using SPSS V. 22.0 software. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study protocol was approved by the ethics committees of Tianjin Medical University (Reference number TMUHEC2019002) that covers all the centres enrolled in this study. The findings of this study will be published in scientific journals and will be presented at scientific conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR2100053168.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Heart Failure , Anxiety/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Self Care/methods
16.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0271350, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963027

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Anxiety, fatigue and depression are common neurological manifestations after COVID-19. So far, post-COVID complications were treated by rehabilitation, oxygen therapy and immunotherapy. Effects of neurofeedback on post-COVID complications and their potential interrelatedness have not been studied yet. In this pilot study, we investigated the effectiveness of neurofeedback (Othmer method) for treatment of fatigue, anxiety, and depression after COVID-19. METHODS: 10 participants met inclusion criteria for having positive anamnesis of at least one of the following complications following COVID-19: fatigue, anxiety, and depression which were measured by questionnaires. ANOVA was used for calculating differences in questionnaire score before and after neurofeedback. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to calculate correlations between anxiety, depression and fatigue. RESULTS: After five neurofeedback sessions, there came to significant reduction of severity of post-COVID anxiety and depression persisting for at least one month. Effect of neurofeedback on fatigue was insignificant. Severity of anxiety, fatigue and depression as well as reductions in depression and fatigue were positively correlated with each other. CONCLUSION: These findings showed effectiveness neurofeedback for reducing anxiety and depression after COVID-19 and for studying correlations between neurological complications after COVID-19. However, since our pilot clinical trial was open-label, it is hard to differentiate between neurofeedback-specific and unspecific effects on our participants. Future randomized controlled trials with more robust sample are necessary to investigate feasibility of neurofeedback for post-COVID neurological complications. The study has identification number trial ID ISRCTN49037874 in ISRCTN register of clinical trials (Retrospectively registered).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurofeedback , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/etiology , Depression/therapy , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/therapy , Humans , Neurofeedback/methods , Pilot Projects
17.
Int J Yoga Therap ; 32(2022)2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1955183

ABSTRACT

The spread of COVID-19 has resulted in reports of increase in stress, anxiety, and depression across society, especially in people who have tested positive for COVID-19, which affects their mental health and well-being. This article reports a quasi-randomized controlled study conducted in the COVID wards of a hospital to examine the efficacy of add-on yoga intervention in reducing stress, anxiety, and depression in COVID-affected patients under quarantine. The peripheral capillary oxygen saturation level and heart rate of the COVID-19-affected patients were also measured. A total of 62 COVID-19-positive patients participated in the study. The participants were randomized into a control group (n = 31), which received conventional medical treatment alone, and a yoga intervention group (n = 31), which received 50 minutes of yoga intervention along with the conventional medical treatment. Standardized Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Item, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Perceived Stress Scale were administered at the beginning and end of the quarantine period. A significant decrease in stress, anxiety, and depression was observed in the patients who undertook the add-on yoga intervention. There was also a significant decrease in anxiety in the control group, but the intervention group had a larger decrease compared to the control group. Further significant improvements in oxygen saturation and heart rate levels were observed in the group of patients who were practicing yoga, but no significant improvement was observed in the control group. Findings of this study suggest that yoga intervention can be an effective add-on practice in reducing stress, anxiety, and depression levels of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Yoga , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Quality of Life , Yoga/psychology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934048

ABSTRACT

Anxiety and depression have been growing global mental health problems. The following studies explored the effect of interactive VR scenarios to find a low-cost and high-efficiency solution. Study 1 designed a 2 (anxiety and depression state) × 4 (interactive VR scenarios) experiment, the results of 20 participants showed that the designed scenarios had good restoration and presence, assisting to improve depression mood for people with mild to moderate anxiety and depression. Study 2 further investigated the intervention effects of two environment types (urban and park) and four interactive activities (automatic viewing, free-roaming, fishing, and watering plants in the park environment), based on data from a 10-minute experiment conducted by 195 participants with mild to moderate anxiety and depression. The subjective scales, EEG and EMG, and scenario experience were analyzed and the results showed that: (1) the restorative and present VR scenarios were beneficial in alleviating state anxiety and depression; (2) the restorative environment and presence were significantly and positively related to the reduction of anxiety and depression respectively, moreover, presence mediated the restorative environment on the recovery from anxiety and depression; (3) the environmental settings, the complexity of interaction, human factors, and maturity of VR devices and technology were also key factors that influenced the effects of interactive VR scenario experience and intervention. These studies revealed VR psychological intervention scenarios could be designed with comprehensive factors. Moreover, they might help pave the way for future study in exploring the physiology and psychology mode in virtual and real spaces, enhancing intervention effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Depression , Virtual Reality , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders , Depression/therapy , Humans
19.
Chronic Illn ; 18(3): 691-701, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928039

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Long COVID affects approximately ten-percent of people following post-acute Coronavirus infection. Long COVID is a complex, multisystemic recent illness. Therefore, there are currently no unitary guidelines on its management. The UK national guidelines currently recommended that interventions are guided by objective research evidence and subjective experiences of patients. They also emphasise multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary professional care and patient self-management. METHODS: The current case study applied patient-led integrated cognitive behavioural therapy in a 36-year-old male presenting with long COVID symptoms with comorbid depression and anxiety. It applied integrated interdisciplinary CBT with emphasis on enhancing patient self-management. The patient attended twelve, individual, 60 min video sessions, via Microsoft Teams over a period of five months. The treatment was conducted in collaboration with the patient's general practitioner, physiotherapists and cardiopulmonary specialists. In line with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, it applied symptom monitoring, graded pacing and behavioural experiments. RESULTS: At the end of therapy, the patient showed reliable change in his somatic symptoms, depression and anxiety symptoms. He also showed improved quality of life. DISCUSSION: This case illustrates the effective use of patient-led CBT for managing symptoms of long COVID with comorbid depression and anxiety in primary care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Adult , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Depression/complications , Depression/therapy , Humans , Male , Primary Health Care , Quality of Life
20.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 58(4): 2897-2909, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923048

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based mandala activity on the anxiety levels and spiritual well-being of nursing students who started clinical practice after distance education during COVID-19 period. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study is a randomized controlled study employing a pre-/posttest design with a single-blind, parallel group. The study was completed with a total of 170 participants (n = 84, intervention group; n = 86, control group). Data were collected using the Descriptive Characteristics Form, State-trait Anxiety Inventory, Spirituality Well-Being Scale, and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The intervention group participated in three mindfulness-based mandala sessions. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT05053178. FINDINGS: In three sessions, there was a significant decrease in the intervention group compared with the control group regarding the mean values of pretest and posttest anxiety levels. Evaluation of the mean scores Spiritual Well-Being Scale before and after the intervention showed a significant decrease in the scores between groups (p < 0.05). PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: With mindfulness-based mandala activity, the well-being of nursing students can be increased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Students, Nursing , Humans , Single-Blind Method , Anxiety/therapy
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