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1.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e26584, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592825

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disrupted social connections may negatively affect youth mental health. In contrast, sustained quality social connections (QSCs) can improve mental health outcomes. However, few studies have examined how these quality connections affect depression and anxiety outcomes within digital interventions, and conceptualization is limited. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to conceptualize, appraise, and synthesize evidence on QSC within digital interventions (D-QSC) and the impact on depression and anxiety outcomes for young people aged 14-24 years. METHODS: A systematic scoping review and meta-analysis was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute methodological frameworks and guided by experts with lived experience. Reporting was guided by the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). The MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases were searched against a comprehensive combination of key concepts on June 24, 2020. The search concepts included young people, digital intervention, depression, anxiety, and social connection. Google was also searched. A reviewer independently screened abstracts and titles and full text, and 9.99% (388/3882) of these were screened by a second reviewer. A narrative synthesis was used to structure the findings on indicators of D-QSC and mechanisms that facilitate the connection. Indicators of D-QSC from the included studies were synthesized to produce a conceptual framework. RESULTS: Of the 5715 publications identified, 42 (0.73%) were included. Among the included studies, there were 23,319 participants. Indicators that D-QSC was present varied and included relatedness, having a sense of belonging, and connecting to similar people. However, despite the variation, most of the indicators were associated with improved outcomes for depression and anxiety. Negative interactions, loneliness, and feeling ignored indicated that D-QSC was not present. In 24% (10/42) of the applicable studies, a meta-analysis showed a significant decrease in depression (-25.6%, 95% CI -0.352 to -0.160; P<.001) and anxiety (-15.1%, 95% CI -0.251 to -0.051; P=.003) after a D-QSC. Digital mechanisms that helped create a quality connection included anonymity, confidentiality, and peer support. In contrast, mechanisms that hindered the connection included disconnection from the real world and inability to see body language. Data synthesis also identified a 5-component conceptual framework of D-QSC that included rapport, identity and commonality, valued interpersonal dynamic, engagement, and responded to and accepted. CONCLUSIONS: D-QSC is an important and underconsidered component for youth depression and anxiety outcomes. Researchers and developers should consider targeting improved QSC between clinicians and young people within digital interventions for depression. Future research should build on our framework to further examine relationships among individual attributes of QSC, various digital interventions, and different populations.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders , Depression , Adolescent , Anxiety/therapy , Depression/therapy , Humans , Loneliness , Mental Health
2.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 634-638, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the effect of social work intervention on psychological intervention of medical workers after the epidemic under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy". SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The observation objects in this study were all medical workers in fever clinic under the epidemic situation in COVID-19. A total of 60 cases were selected, and the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers in fever clinic was investigated by electronic questionnaire. After completing the investigation, social work intervention measures under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" were implemented. RESULTS: After implementation, the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers were significantly lower than those before intervention (P<0.05). The development of music therapy activities has alleviated the job anxiety of medical workers to a great extent, and the job anxiety test, total score and scores of various factors have all decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Social work intervention under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" can relieve anxiety and depression, and ensure the mental health of frontline medical staff during the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music Therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Work
3.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 31-38, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are two to four times more prevalent in people with CF (pwCF) than the general population. COVID-19 may exacerbate mental health challenges, increasing demand for psychological services, while decreasing their availability. We assessed the impact of the pandemic on depression and anxiety in pwCF, including how COVID-19 affected the frequency of mental health screening and the types of services provided. METHODS: A 38-item internet survey, completed in June 2020, assessed how COVID-19 affected: 1) the mental health clinician's role and screening processes; 2) barriers to screening and resource needs; 3) impact of COVID-19 on depression and anxiety, and 4) positive outcomes and confidence in sustaining mental health screening and treatment, including telehealth services, after the pandemic. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 131 of the 289 US CF programs. Overall, 60% of programs (n=79) continued mental health screening and treatment, although less frequently; 50% provided individual tele-mental health interventions, and 9% provided telehealth group therapy. Clinically elevated depression symptoms (PHQ-9≥10; moderate to severe), were found in 12% of 785 pwCF, with 3.1% endorsing suicidal ideation. Similarly, elevated anxiety (moderate to severe; GAD-7≥10) was found in 13% of pwCF (n=779). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic created an opportunity to implement innovative solutions to disruptions in mental health screening and treatment in CF programs. We found that pwCF had increased access to psychological interventions during the pandemic via telehealth, supporting the continued integration of tele-mental health screening and treatment into CF care.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Depression , Mental Health , Psychosocial Intervention , Telemedicine , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Needs Assessment , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychosocial Intervention/trends , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
4.
J Anxiety Disord ; 84: 102494, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internet cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for health anxiety has demonstrated efficacy but has not been evaluated during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study presents the first evaluation of the uptake and outcomes of iCBT for health anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: THIS WAY UP is an Australian digital mental health service which delivers iCBT interventions to community members. We compared the uptake of THIS WAY UP's iCBT course for health anxiety in an Australian adult sample who started the course before the pandemic (12th September 2019-11 th March 2020) to during the pandemic (12th March to 11th June 2020). The course was accessible to Australian adults over 18 years old, with no inclusion criteria. Outcomes included course registrations and commencements, lesson and course completion, and self-reported health anxiety (Short Health Anxiety Inventory), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item) and distress (Kessler-10). RESULTS: From March to June 2020, we observed significant increases in course registrations (N = 238 vs N = 1057); and course commencements (N = 126 vs. N = 778). Large, significant improvements in health anxiety (g = 0.89), and distress (K10: g = 0.91), and medium improvements in depression (g = 0.55) were found. Course completion during COVID was 30.5%. CONCLUSIONS: iCBT improved health anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic, and provides scalable intervention that can address increased demands for mental health services in the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/therapy , Australia , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
5.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1984049, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506934

ABSTRACT

Background: Frontline healthcare workers, recovered COVID+ patients who had severe illness, and close others of COVID+ patients who have recovered or died are at risk for clinical levels of mental health symptoms in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESTORE (Recovering from Extreme Stressors Through Online Resources and E-health) was specifically designed for this context. RESTORE is a transdiagnostic guided online intervention adapted from evidence-based cognitive-behavioural therapies. Objectives: RESTORE was designed to address depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms associated with exposure to COVID-19-related traumatic and extreme stressors, and to overcome multiple barriers to accessing psychotherapies. Method: This paper describes the intervention components and platform, as well as the principles used to develop RESTORE. Current research and future directions in developing and testing RESTORE are outlined. Results: Preliminary data from an initial uncontrolled trial evaluating RESTORE in frontline healthcare workers is highly promising. Conclusion: We believe RESTORE has great potential to provide accessible, evidence-based psychological intervention to those in great need.


Antecedentes: Los trabajadores de salud de primera línea, los pacientes de COVID positivo recuperados que tenían una enfermedad grave y las personas cercanas a los pacientes de COVID positivo que se han recuperado o fallecido están en riesgo de presentar niveles clínicos de síntomas de salud mental en el contexto de la pandemia de COVID-19. RESTORE (por sus siglas en inglés: Recovering from Extreme Stressors Through Online Resources and E-health: Recuperación de estresores extremos a través de recursos en línea y salud electrónica) fue diseñada específicamente para este contexto. RESTORE es una intervención en línea guiada transdiagnóstica adaptada de terapias cognitivo-conductuales basadas en la evidencia.Objetivos: RESTORE fue diseñado para abordar la depresión, la ansiedad y los síntomas del trastorno de estrés postraumático asociados con la exposición a factores estresantes traumáticos y extremos relacionados con COVID-19, y para superar múltiples barreras para acceder a psicoterapias.Método: Este artículo describe los componentes y la plataforma de la intervención, así como los principios utilizados para desarrollar RESTORE. Se describen las investigaciones actuales y las direcciones futuras para desarrollar y testear RESTORE.Resultados: Los datos preliminares de un ensayo inicial no controlado que evalúa RESTORE en trabajadores de salud de primera línea son muy prometedores.Conclusión: Creemos que RESTORE tiene un gran potencial para brindar una intervención psicológica accesible y basada en la evidencia a quienes más lo necesitan.背景: 在 COVID-19 疫情背景下, 一线医护人员, 重症 COVID+ 康复患者以及已康复或死亡的 COVID+ 患者的其他亲友都有出现临床心理健康症状的风险。 RESTORE (通过在线资源和电子健康从极端应激源中恢复) 专为这种情况而设计。 RESTORE 是一种改编自循证认知行为疗法的跨诊断指导的在线干预。目的: RESTORE 旨在致力于 COVID-19 相关创伤性和极端应激源暴露相关的抑郁, 焦虑和创伤后应激障碍症状, 并克服心理治疗可得性的多种障碍。方法: 本文介绍了干预组成和平台, 以及用于开发RESTORE的原则。概述了开发和测试 RESTORE 的当前研究和未来方向。结果: 来自评估一线医护人员 RESTORE 的初始非对照试验的初步数据大有前景。结论: 我们相信 RESTORE 有很大的潜力为急需帮助者提供易得, 询证的心理干预。.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Depression/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Internet-Based Intervention , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
6.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e053971, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484035

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Approximately 30% of people with long-term physical health conditions (LTCs) experience mental health problems, with negative consequences and costs for individuals and healthcare services. Access to psychological treatment is scarce and, when available, often focuses on treating primary mental health problems rather than illness-related anxiety/depression. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a newly developed, therapist-supported, digital cognitive-behavioural treatment (COMPASS) for reducing LTC-related psychological distress (anxiety/depression), compared with standard charity support (SCS). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A two-arm, parallel-group randomised controlled trial (1:1 ratio) with nested qualitative study will be conducted. Two-hundred adults with LTC-related anxiety and depression will be recruited through national LTC charities. They will be randomly allocated to receive COMPASS or SCS only. An independent administrator will use Qualtrics randomiser for treatment allocation, to ensure allocation concealment. Participants will access treatment from home over 10 weeks. The COMPASS group will have access to the digital programme and six therapist contacts: one welcome message and five fortnightly phone calls. Data will be collected online at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks post-randomisation for primary outcome (Patient Health Questionnaire Anxiety and Depression Scale) and secondary outcomes (anxiety, depression, daily functioning, COVID-19-related distress, illness-related distress, quality of life, knowledge and confidence for illness self-management, symptom severity and improvement). Analyses will be conducted following the intention-to-treat principle by a data analyst blinded to treatment allocation. A purposively sampled group of COMPASS participants and therapists will be interviewed. Interviews will be thematically analysed. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by King's College London's Psychiatry, Nursing and Midwifery Research Ethics Subcommittee (reference: LRS-19/20-20347). All participants will provide informed consent to take part if eligible. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04535778.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Adult , Anxiety/therapy , Depression/therapy , Humans , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
7.
Psychiatry Res ; 305: 114222, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433745

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had adverse mental health effects for many groups in British society, especially young adults and university students. The present study reports secondary outcomes (i.e., symptoms of anxiety and depression) from a randomized waitlist controlled trial, with a one-month post-intervention follow-up, on the effects of a guided, eight-week mindfulness program delivered online during the COVID-19 pandemic among students at the University of Oxford. Longitudinal multilevel models showed greater reductions in anxiety but not depression symptoms for participants in the mindfulness condition relative to participants in the waitlist control condition (time X group B=-0.36, p=.025).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Anxiety/therapy , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Universities , Young Adult
8.
Psychodyn Psychiatry ; 49(3): 384-387, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394603

ABSTRACT

The author, an experienced psycho-oncologist, offers clinical insights that consider the importance of death anxiety in psychodynamic psychotherapy treatments during the COVID-19 pandemic. He reviews the contributions of Ernst Becker, Wilfred Bion and Sheldon Solomon, and formulates ideas of his own based on decades of experience treating patients with cancer. This short essay focuses on how to help patients during the COVID-19 pandemic work through fear and uncertainty while developing adaptive skills.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/therapy , Attitude to Death , COVID-19/psychology , Psychotherapy, Psychodynamic/methods , Adaptation, Psychological , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Uncertainty
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(32): e26898, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358519

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the anxiety and depression of patients with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who participated in Baduanjin exercise.From February 20, 2020 to March 7, 2020, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD) were used to investigate the anxiety and depression levels of patients with COVID-19 who participated in Baduanjin exercise. Ninety one questionnaires were received, including 40 males and 51 females. Stepwise regression analysis was used to analyze the effects of related factors on anxiety and depression levels.In Square cabin hospital, 91% of patients participated in Baduanjin exercise had no obvious anxiety and 82% had no obvious depression. The scores of anxiety and depression of female patients were significantly higher than that of male patients. Bachelor degree or above with low scores for anxiety and depression. The frequency of Baduanjin exercise was negatively correlated with anxiety and depression score.The development of Baduanjin exercise has a certain positive influence on the COVID-19 patients in the Square cabin hospital, which is conducive to alleviate anxiety and depression symptoms of the patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Depression/therapy , Exercise Therapy/standards , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Exercise Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychometrics/instrumentation , Psychometrics/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 60: e110-e116, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356394

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Children in the intensive care unit experience a high level of pain and anxiety. This study aimed to reveal the health care providers experience of non-pharmacological pain and anxiety management and its barriers in the pediatric intensive care unit. METHODS: This qualitative-descriptive study was conducted with thirteen nurses and five physicians in the pediatric intensive care unit in Iran. Individual, in-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted, which were analyzed by conventional content analysis. RESULTS: Five main categories were identified from data analysis: 1) The importance of parents' presence, 2) Disturbance in the presence of parents and communication during the COVID-19 pandemic, 3) Choosing non-pharmacological approaches according to the child's interests and conditions, 4) Building trust in the child through non-pharmacological interventions 5) Barriers to non-pharmacological pain and anxiety management in the pediatric intensive care unit. CONCLUSION: Health care providers implement some non-pharmacological methods to manage pain and anxiety in the pediatric intensive care unit. Facilitating the open presence of parents, using innovative methods to communicate with children, and training and psychological support for nurses and parents, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic are recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/therapy , Child , Health Personnel , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Pain , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Future Oncol ; 17(25): 3373-3381, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320568

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess the anxiety levels of breast cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials & methods: A total of 298 patients completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S and STAI-T) and the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety (VAS) and VAS for Anxiety in COVID-19 (VAS-CoV). Results: 144 patients were in the high anxiety category for STAI-S, and 202 patients were in the high anxiety category for STAI-T. STAI-T score was significantly high in the metastatic group (p = 0.017). VAS-CoV score in the hormonotherapy group was significantly higher than in the no-treatment group (p = 0.023). There was a positive correlation between VAS-CoV and VAS levels (r = 0.708, p < 0.001), VAS-CoV and STAI-S and STAI-T scores (r = 0.402, p < 0.001; r = 0.185, p = 0.001, respectively), and a negative correlation between education years and STAI-T scores (r = -0.172, p = 0.003). Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic is related to high anxiety levels in breast cancer patients.


Lay abstract COVID-19 pandemic is related to rapidly rising anxiety levels worldwide. Because of the high mortality of COVID-19 in cancer patients, changing treatment routines and disruptions of the healthcare system, cancer patients are the most affected population in this situation. Anxiety among females and breast cancer patients tend to be high, although anxiety levels in cancer patients during the pandemic period varies according to the cancer type, treatment status and sociodemographic factors. This study assessed the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer patients' anxiety levels according to treatment status and stage of the disease. A total of 298 breast cancer patients completed the universally validated anxiety questionnaires. Results demonstrated high trait anxiety in breast cancer patients, particularly in the metastatic group. The current findings highlighted the importance of intensive assessment and close monitoring of breast cancer patients' psychological situations. It is crucial to provide psychological support to breast cancer patients to contribute to both treatment and follow-up processes during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Management , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Public Health Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Turkey/epidemiology
12.
Biol Pharm Bull ; 44(7): 1019-1023, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292126

ABSTRACT

To prevent cognitive decline, non-pharmacological therapies such as reminiscence for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are required, however, the use of nursing homes was limited due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Therefore, the demand for remote-care is increasing. We hypothesized that immersive virtual reality (iVR) could be used more effectively than conventional reminiscence for anxiety. We first examined the effectiveness and safety of reminiscence using iVR (iVR reminiscence session) in patients with MCI. After COVID-19 imposed restriction on visiting nursing homes, we conducted online iVR reminiscence session (remote iVR reminiscence session) and compared its effectiveness with that of interpersonal iVR reminiscence session (face-to-face iVR reminiscence session). The results of two elderly with MCI suggested that iVR reminiscence could reduce anxiety and the burden of care without serious side effects. The effects of remote iVR reminiscence might be almost as effective as those of face-to-face one.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , Cognitive Dysfunction/therapy , Imagery, Psychotherapy/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Virtual Reality , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/complications , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mobile Applications , Nursing Homes , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Treatment Outcome
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(26): e26419, 2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether music therapy improves coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients' anxiety, depression, and life quality are still controversial. Therefore, to provide evidence-based medical evidence for clinical non-pharmacological interventions, we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of music therapy for COVID-19 patients' anxiety, depression, and life quality. METHODS: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Repositories, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Chinese Science Citation Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Wan-Fang database were searched to identify studies on the evaluation of the effectiveness of the music-based intervention on COVID-19 patients' anxiety, depression, and life quality from inception to May 2021. Two researchers independently carried out data extraction and literature quality evaluation of the quality and the meta-analysis on the included literature was performed with Revman5.3 software. RESULTS: The results of this meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSION: This study will provide reliable evidence-based evidence for the effects of music therapy on COVID-19 patients' anxiety, depression, and life quality.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/therapy , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Music Therapy , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Clinical Protocols , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e045474, 2021 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282096

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Childhood anxiety is common, causes significant functional impairment and may lead to psychosocial problems by adulthood. Although cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective for treating anxiety, its availability is limited by the lack of trained CBT therapists and easily accessible local services. To address the challenges in both recognition and treatment, this study combines systematic anxiety screening in the general population with a randomised controlled trial (RCT) on internet-assisted CBT (ICBT) with telephone coaching. Child, family and intervention-related factors are studied as possible predictors or moderators, together with the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study is an open two-parallel group RCT, stratified by sex, that compares ICBT with telephone coaching to an education control. Children aged 10-13 are screened at yearly school healthcare check-ups using five items from the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Questionnaire. The families of children who screen positive for anxiety are contacted to assess the family's eligibility for the RCT. The inclusion criteria include scoring at least 22 points in the 41-item SCARED Questionnaire. The primary outcome is the SCARED child and parent reports. The secondary outcomes include the impact of anxiety, quality of life, comorbidity, peer relationships, perceptions of school, parental well-being and service use. Additional measures include demographics and life events, anxiety disorder diagnoses, as well as therapeutic partnerships, the use of the programme and general satisfaction among the intervention group. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has been approved by the research ethics board of the Hospital District of South West Finland and local authorities. Participation is voluntary and based on informed consent. The anonymity of the participants will be protected and the results will be published in a scientific journal and disseminated to healthcare professionals and the general public. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03310489, pre-results, initially released on 30 September 2017.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Mentoring , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19 , Child , Finland , Humans , Internet , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone , Treatment Outcome
15.
J Clin Neurosci ; 91: 9-12, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275514

ABSTRACT

To assess the anxiety and depression situation and psychological intervention effect of the first-line medical staff in our hospital during the COVID-19 epidemic. A total of 384 front-line medical staff in our hospital from January 25 to March 8, 2020 were selected as subjects, which were divided into group A and group B respectively. PHQ-9 depression scale and GAD-7 self-rating anxiety scale questionnaire were used to investigate their anxiety and depression. After 1 month, all subjects were re-self-assessed for anxiety and depression, which were named as A1 and B1 group respectively. The GAD-7 anxiety scale had mild, moderate, and severe anxiety scores before group A, which were significantly higher than those in group B (P < 0.05); after psychological intervention, group A1 had significantly reduced anxiety scores (P < 0.05). And there were no markedly difference of PHQ-9 scale scores before and after psychological intervention between groups A and B, A and A1, and B and B1 (P > 0.05). The first-line medical staff in our hospital have different degree of anxiety and depression during COVID-19. Early positive psychological intervention has an effect on ameliorating the anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Medical Staff , Psychosocial Intervention , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 30 Suppl 1: 1437-1444, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273105

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 significantly affects patients' mental health, triggering a wide range of psychological disorders, including anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mandala colouring on the anxiety of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were randomly divided between the intervention and control groups. Standard care was provided for both groups. The intervention group spent 30 min/day for six consecutive days performing mandala colouring. Patient anxiety was measured prior and subsequent to the intervention in both groups using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Data were analysed using SPSS software version 25. The mean anxiety score was not significantly different between the two groups before the intervention (P = 0.08). Subsequent to the intervention, the mean anxiety score in the intervention and control groups was 44.05 ± 4.67 and 67.85 ± 6.25, respectively, indicating a statistically significant (P = 0.0001) decrease in the anxiety measured among the intervention group as compared with that of the control group. The results of this study show that 30 min of mandala colouring daily is an effective strategy for reducing anxiety in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Mandala colouring can complement routine treatment and provides a non-pharmaceutical option for decreasing patient anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Humans , Patients , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(24): e26332, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269621

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients after breast cancer surgery have a high sense of stigma due to the formation of surgical scars, loss of breast shape or other reasons, leading to anxiety, depression, and other adverse mental health problems, thus reducing their quality of life. Remote peer support intervention based on telephone, internet or email is low-cost and easy to spread, and protects patients' privacy, solves the barriers to access that many patients face when attending face-to-face programs. Therefore, remote peer support may be an effective way to reduce stigma and improve mental health in patients after breast cancer surgery during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: Eight databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI, PsycNET, MEDLINE, Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection and Web of Science) will be used to select eligible studies that were published from inception to May, 2021. The eligible studies will be screened, extracted and then the methodological quality will be evaluated independently by 2 reviewers. Review manager software version 5.3 software and Stata version 14.0 software will be used for meta-analysis. RESULTS: The results of this study will show the effect of remote peer support on stigma, depression and anxiety in patients after breast cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will provide evidence for the effectiveness of remote peer support in patients after breast cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021255971.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Mastectomy/psychology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Social Stigma , Social Support , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Depression/etiology , Depression/therapy , Female , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Peer Group , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
19.
Behav Res Ther ; 144: 103902, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267616

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a severe impact on mental health worldwide, with increased rates of anxiety and depression widely documented. The aim of this study was to examine unguided low intensity cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety and depression during the pandemic. A sample of 225 individuals in Australia and the United Kingdom (M age 37.79, SD = 14.02, range 18-80 years; 85% female) were randomised into intervention or waitlist control. The intervention group demonstrated significant decreases in anxiety (d = 0.36 [0.18, 0.54]) and depression (d = 0.28 [0.11, 0.45]) compared to controls. The majority of participants (96%) rated the intervention as useful, and most (83%) reported they spent 30 min or less reading the guide, with 83% agreeing the intervention was easy to read. The results indicate that low intensity cognitive behaviour therapy has efficacy in reducing anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need to disseminate low intensity psychological therapies to improve mental health in this challenging time.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Depression/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , Australia , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom , Young Adult
20.
Trials ; 22(1): 382, 2021 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261278

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As COVID-19 is spreading, new psychological health problems are suspected to be emerging among pregnant women. Higher maternal mental health distress, including perinatal anxiety, depression, and COVID-19-specific phobia, is supposed to be increasing during the pandemic, which impacts pregnant women's health and their infants and calls for intervention. Due to the social distancing protocols posed by the pandemic, telemental health interventions have fast become the most common form of psychosocial support for maternal mental health. However, there is no evidence of the effectiveness of maternal low-intensity psychosocial telemental interventions in improving mental health outcomes. The trial's objective is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of telemental low-intensity psychosocial interventions in pregnant and postpartum women attending the Women Wellness and Research Centre in Qatar in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The clinical trial is randomized in which pregnant women will be assigned equally through block randomization between two arms: (1) a control group and (2) an intervention group. The primary endpoint is the perinatal psychological distress, including perinatal depression, anxiety, and COVID-19 phobia in their third trimester; the secondary, tertiary, fourth, and fifth endpoints will be in the postnatal period (3-5 weeks, 2-4 months, 5-7 months, and 8-10 months). This trial involves pregnant women in their second trimester with no mental health illness history who communicate in English and Arabic and consent to participate. A sample size of 58 (29 participants per arm) is targeted. DISCUSSION: This study will provide recommendations about the efficacy of low-intensity psychosocial maternal telemental interventions to be implemented as a preventive service. TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2a-ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04594525 . Registered on October 20, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Pregnancy , Qatar , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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