Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Cardiovasc Res ; 117(9): 2045-2053, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526155

ABSTRACT

Although coronavirus disease 2019 seems to be the leading topic in research number of outstanding studies have been published in the field of aorta and peripheral vascular diseases likely affecting our clinical practice in the near future. This review article highlights key research on vascular diseases published in 2020. Some studies have shed light in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm and dissection suggesting a potential role for kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic options. A first proteogenomic study on fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) revealed a promising novel disease gene and provided proof-of-concept for a protein/lipid-based FMD blood test. The role of NADPH oxidases in vascular physiology, and particularly endothelial cell differentiation, is highlighted with potential for cell therapy development. Imaging of vulnerable plaque has been an intense field of research. Features of plaque vulnerability on magnetic resonance imaging as an under-recognized cause of stroke are discussed. Major clinical trials on lower extremity peripheral artery disease have shown added benefit of dual antithrombotic (aspirin plus rivaroxaban) treatment.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases , Biomedical Research/trends , Peripheral Vascular Diseases , Animals , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , Aortic Diseases/genetics , Aortic Diseases/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/genetics , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/therapy , Prognosis
2.
J Card Surg ; 36(3): 848-856, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029257

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A significant restructuring of the healthcare services has taken place since the declaration of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, with elective surgery put on hold to concentrate intensive care resources to treat COVID-19 as well as to protect patients who are waiting for relatively low risk surgery from exposure to potentially infected hospital environment. METHODS: Multicentre study, with 19 participating centers, to define the impact of the pandemic on the provision of aortovascular services and patients' outcomes after having adapted the thresholds for intervention to guarantee access to treatment for emergency and urgent conditions. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, including all patients with aortovascular conditions admitted for surgical or conservative treatment from the 1st March to the 20th May 2020. RESULTS: A total of 189 patients were analyzed, and 182 underwent surgery. Diagnosis included: aneurysm (45%), acute aortic syndrome (44%), pseudoaneurysm (4%), aortic valve endocarditis (4%), and other (3%). Timing for surgery was: emergency (40%), urgent (34%), or elective (26%). In-hospital mortality was 12%. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 during the peri-operative period, and this subgroup was not associated with a higher mortality. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant change in service provision for aortovascular patients in the UK. Although the emergency and urgent surgical activity were maintained, elective treatment was minimal during early months of the pandemic. The preoperative COVID-19 screening protocol, combined with self-isolation and shielding, contributed to the low incidence of COVID-19 in our series and a mortality similar to that of pre-pandemic outcomes.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Surgical Procedures/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
J Card Surg ; 36(1): 199-202, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917750

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has restructured the healthcare systems, prioritizing resources to treat COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to establish if patients affected by acute aortic syndrome (AAS) had unrestricted access to emergency treatment and evaluate outcome of these patients during the peak of the pandemic. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data between March and June 2020 from 19 participating cardiac surgery centers in the United Kingdom. RESULTS: Among 95 patients who presented with an AAS in the participating centers; 85 (89%) underwent surgery, 7 (7%) were turned down for surgery because of their profile of comorbidities, and 3 (3%) died on transfer. Among the patients treated conservatively, three of them (43%) were alive at 30 days. We observed no significant restriction in access to treatment for AAS during the early months of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Services for life-threatening aortic surgery patients were maintained during the COVID-19 period through patient selection and timing of surgery. The rate of surgical turn-down was comparable to published figures despite the challenges faced during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Patient Selection , Retrospective Studies , Syndrome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
J Card Surg ; 36(5): 1683-1692, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838066

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To share the results of a web-based expert panel discussion focusing on the management of acute and chronic aortic disease during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A web-based expert panel discussion on April 18, 2020, where eight experts were invited to share their experience with COVID-19 disease touching several aspects of aortic medicine. After each talk, specific questions were asked by the online audience, and results were immediately evaluated and shared with faculty and participants. RESULTS: As of April 18, 73.3% answered that more than 200 patients have been treated at their respective settings. Sixty-four percent were reported that their hospital was well prepared for the pandemic. In 57.7%, the percentage of infected healthcare professionals was below 5% whereas 19.2% reported the percentage to be between 10% and 20%. Sixty-seven percent reported the application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in less than 2% of COVID-19 patients whereas 11.8% reported application in 5%-10% of COVID-19 patients. Thirty percent of participants reported the occurrence of pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 patients. Three percent reported to have seen aortic ruptures in primarily elective patients having been postponed because of the anticipated need to provide sufficient ICU capacity because of the pandemic. Nearly 70% reported a decrease in acute aortic syndrome referrals since the start of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The current COVID-19 pandemic has-besides the stoppage of elective referrals-also led to a decrease of referrals of acute aortic syndromes in many settings. The reluctance of patients seeking medical help seems to be a major driver. The number of patients, who have been postponed due to the provisioning of ICU resources but having experienced aortic rupture in the waiting period, is still low. Further, studies are needed to learn more about the influence that the COVID-19 pandemic has on the treatment of patients with acute and chronic aortic disease.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases , COVID-19 , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL