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1.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(2): 881-895, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788329

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The use of telepractice in the field of communication disorders offers an opportunity to provide care for those with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). The Western Aphasia Battery-Revised (WAB-R) is used for differential diagnosis, to assess severity of aphasia, and to identify a language profile of strengths and challenges. Telehealth administration of the WAB-R is supported for those with chronic aphasia due to stroke but has not yet been systematically explored in neurodegenerative dementia syndromes. To fill this gap, in-person and telehealth performance on the WAB-R from participants with mild to moderate PPA was compared. METHOD: Nineteen participants with mild to moderate PPA were administered the WAB-R in person and over videoconferencing. Videoconferencing administration included modifications to the testing protocol to ensure smooth completion of the assessment. Subtest and Aphasia Quotient (WAB-AQ) summary scores were compared using concordance coefficients to measure the relationship between the administration modes. RESULTS: In-person and telehealth scores showed strong concordance for the WAB-AQ, Auditory Verbal Comprehension subtest, and Naming & Word Finding subtest. The Spontaneous Speech test summary score had slightly lower concordance, indicating the need for caution when comparing these scores across administration modes. CONCLUSION: These findings support extending the use of telehealth administration of the WAB-R via videoconferencing to those with mild to moderate PPA given appropriate modifications to testing protocol.


Subject(s)
Aphasia, Primary Progressive , Aphasia , Aphasia/diagnosis , Aphasia/etiology , Aphasia, Primary Progressive/diagnosis , Humans , Language , Language Tests , Reproducibility of Results
2.
J Integr Neurosci ; 21(1): 8, 2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687835

ABSTRACT

We report on our remote speech therapy experience in post-stroke aphasia. The aim was to test the feasibility and utility of telerehabilitation to support future randomized controlled trials. Post-stroke aphasia is a common and disabling speech disorder, which significantly affects patients' and caregivers' health and quality of life. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, most of the conventional speech therapy approaches had to stop or "switch" into telerehabilitation procedures to ensure the safety of patients and operators but, concomitantly, the best rehabilitation level possible. Here, we planned a 5-month telespeech therapy programme, twice per week, of a patient with non-fluent aphasia following an intracerebral haemorrhage. Overall, treatment adherence based on the operator's assessments was high, and incomplete adherence for technical problems occurred very rarely. In line with the patient's feedback, acceptability was also positive, since he was constantly motivated during the sessions and the exercises performed autonomously, as confirmed by the speech therapist and caregiver, respectively. Moreover, despite the sequelae from the cerebrovascular event, evident in some writing tests due to the motor deficits in his right arm and the disadvantages typical of all telepractices, more relevant results were achieved during the telerehabilitation period compared to those of the "face-to-face" therapy before the COVID-19 outbreak. The telespeech therapy performed can be considered successful and the patient was able to return to work. Concluding, we support it as a feasible approach offering patients and their families the opportunity to continue the speech and language rehabilitation pathway, even at the time of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aphasia/rehabilitation , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Stroke/complications , Telerehabilitation , Aphasia/etiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Language Therapy/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Speech Therapy/methods , Treatment Outcome
3.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 426, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are increasingly recognized and include encephalopathy, although direct infection of the brain by SARS-CoV-2 remains controversial. We herein report the clinical course and cytokine profiles of a patient with severe SARS-CoV-2-related encephalopathy presenting aphasia. CASE PRESENTATION: An 81-year-old man developed acute consciousness disturbance and status epileptics several days after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Following treatment with remdesivir and dexamethasone, his consciousness and epileptic seizures improved; however, amnestic aphasia and agraphia remained. Two months after methylprednisolone pulse and intravenous immunoglobulin, his neurological deficits improved. We found increased levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), but not IL-2 and IL-10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the levels of serum IL-6 and MCP-1 were much higher than those in the CSF. The level of IL-8 in the CSF after immunotherapy was four times higher than that before immunotherapy. CONCLUSION: The cytokine profile of our patient was similar to that seen in severe SARS-CoV-2-related encephalopathy. We demonstrated (i) that the characteristic aphasia can occur as a focal neurological deficit associated with SARS-CoV-2-related encephalopathy, and (ii) that IL8-mediated central nervous system inflammation follows systemic inflammation in SARS-CoV-2-related encephalopathy and can persist and worsen even after immunotherapy. Monitoring IL-8 in CSF, and long-term corticosteroids may be required for treating SARS-CoV-2-related encephalopathy.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Interleukin-8 , Male , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 21(11): 61, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482288

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Aphasia is an acquired neurological language disorder after brain damages. Persons with aphasia (PWA) are more susceptible to behavioral and emotional implications due to inherent communication and/or cognitive difficulties. Currently, little is known regarding the impact of COVID-19 on PWA. RECENT FINDINGS: There are now growing reports with evidence of neurological and dysexecutive syndromes subsequent to interference of brain functions in acute patients with COVID-19, leading to variable aphasia-like symptoms. COVID-19 affected chronic PWA more in terms of disrupted communication and daily routines, worsened psychosocial well-being, and difficulties getting aphasia services that adequately addressed their needs. Acute versus chronic PWA were disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Recognizing, examining, and managing COVID-19-related neurological and behavioral problems in PWA is not straightforward. As we passed the 1-year mark and approaching the 2-year mark of the onset of COVID-19, more research is necessary to prioritize strategies for improving current evidence-based care and rehabilitation of aphasia.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , COVID-19 , Aphasia/etiology , Communication , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 64(3): 1008-1022, 2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454832

ABSTRACT

Aim The aim of this scoping review is to identify the eye tracking paradigms and eye movement measures used to investigate auditory and reading comprehension deficits in persons with aphasia (PWA). Method MEDLINE via PubMed, Cochrane, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, OTseeker, Scopus, Google Scholar, Grey Literature Database, and ProQuest Search (Dissertations & Theses) were searched for relevant studies. The Covidence software was used to manage the initial and full-text screening process for the search. Results and Discussion From a total of 1,803 studies, 68 studies were included for full-text screening. In addition, 418 records from gray literature were also screened. After full-text screening, 16 studies were included for this review-12 studies for auditory comprehension in PWA and four studies for reading comprehension in PWA. The review highlights the use of common eye tracking paradigms used to study language comprehension in PWA. We also discusse eye movement measures and how they help in assessing auditory and reading comprehension. Methodological challenges of using eye tracking are discussed. Conclusion The studies summarized in this scoping review provide evidence that the eye tracking methods are beneficial for studying auditory and reading comprehension in PWA.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , Comprehension , Eye Movements , Eye-Tracking Technology , Humans
6.
J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 64(6): 2038-2046, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263515

ABSTRACT

Purpose The use of technology (e.g., telehealth) in clinical settings has rapidly increased, and its use in research settings continues to grow. The aim of this report is to present one potential solution to a clinical issue that of virtual and remote assessment for the purposes of spoken language research in persons with aphasia (PWA). To do so, we report detailed methods for conducting a multitimepoint (test-retest) virtual paradigm, assessing lifestyle, physiological, cognitive, and linguistic factors in persons with and without aphasia. Method Procedures for virtual assessment are detailed in a sample of adults with no brain damage (N = 24) and PWA (N = 25) on a test-retest paradigm (data collection approximately 10 ± 3 days apart). This report provides practical information about pre-assessment (e.g., recruitment, scheduling), assessment (e.g., aphasia-friendly consent presentation, investigator fidelity), and postassessment (e.g., data storage, quality check) procedures for human behavior research using a virtual platform. Results Preliminary study data are provided, indicating high retention rates, high rates of data acquisition, and feasibility. Common technological troubles and solutions are discussed, and solutions are offered. The results suggest that our pre-assessment, assessment, and postassessment procedures contributed to the success of our study. Conclusions We provide a practical methodology for conducting a multitimepoint study, with considerations for PWA, adding to the body of research on telehealth in clinical populations. Future studies should continue to evaluate telemethodology, which may be core for diversifying studies, improving study retention, and enrolling larger sample sizes. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14608101.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , Brain Injuries , Adult , Humans , Linguistics
7.
J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 64(1): 176-180, 2021 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065979

ABSTRACT

Purpose Enhancing social participation and reducing emotional distress in persons with aphasia (PWA) are a critical rehabilitation goal. Social relationships and meaningful activities performed by PWA are also crucial to promote positive psychosocial well-being. As a precautionary measure specific to the COVID-19 pandemic, most PWA worldwide have generally followed the guidelines of going out less, restricting when and where to gather with friends and peers, reducing social activities, and maintaining appropriate social distance; these acts are contrary to the traditional principles of managing aphasia. This article aims to (a) highlight and add to our understanding of issues related to the impact of the currently evolving COVID-19 pandemic on PWA, (b) direct readers to relevant reports in the literature of telerehabilitation for aphasia to look for useful information regarding remote assessment and therapy to be considered during the pandemic, (c) summarize support initiatives developed and resources compiled thus far as well as provide links for caregivers and PWA to find more information about COVID-19 in their communities, and (d) offer recommendations to potentially move the field of aphasia research and clinical PWA services forward in a positive way to endure the pandemic and in the forthcoming post-COVID world. Conclusions At present, there are significant knowledge gaps regarding the short and long-term impacts of COVID-19 on PWA and their caregivers. It is crucial that different stakeholders be sensitive and flexible when addressing the psychosocial and rehabilitation needs of PWA to mitigate the negative effects during and after the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Aphasia/rehabilitation , COVID-19 , Humans , Telerehabilitation
8.
Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes ; 156-157: 1-8, 2020 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841442

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: About 35,000 people in Germany suffered from stroke-related aphasia in 2019. One of the most frequent manifestations of aphasia are word finding disorders. In times of the COVID-19 pandemic, the temporary approval of video therapy enables the maintenance of speech therapy treatment. This leads to the necessity to investigate the effectiveness of screen-to-screen therapy via a video conferencing system compared to conventional face-to-face therapy of adult aphasia patients. METHODS: For this scoping review, a literature search in the databases Cochrane, Pubmed and Web of Science was conducted for the period February 2010 to 2020. We included German- and English-language studies comparing the effectiveness of a classic face-to-face therapy with a screen-to-screen therapy of adults with aphasia. The studies were selected using the PRISMA flowchart. RESULTS: A total of five studies were identified. Both face-to-face therapy and screen-to-screen therapy showed significant improvements in naming performance in an Italian crossover study, a Canadian randomized study and a quasi-randomized study conducted in the UK. No improvements were found for both forms of intervention in an Israeli crossover study. In a German comparative study, significant improvements in naming performance were found for face-to-face therapy, but the results did not differ significantly from the screen-to-screen therapy intervention group. DISCUSSION: In all included studies, screen-to-screen therapy and face-to-face therapy had a comparable effectiveness on naming performance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a screen-to-screen therapy under everyday conditions. However, it is possible that this form of therapy cannot always be implemented. Barriers to screen-to-screen therapy can be the use of technologies and restrictions in the visual field due to a neglect. One limitation of the scoping review was that only the naming performance was considered as an outcome, another was the small number of studies included. CONCLUSION: For many patients screen-to-screen therapy is currently the only possibility to receive speech therapy treatment. Therefore it is a positive aspect that screen-to-screen therapy is as effective as face-to-face therapy. Screen-to-screen therapy can provide expanded access to health care and professional expertise in health services. In this way, speech therapy care during the COVID-19 pandemic can be largely maintained. Further research is needed on evidence-based treatment methods and user-oriented apps for video therapy.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke , Telemedicine , Videoconferencing , Adult , Aphasia/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Canada , Cross-Over Studies , Germany , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/therapy , User-Computer Interface
9.
J Neuroimmunol ; 349: 577400, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792960

ABSTRACT

Encephalopathy is emerging as a recurrent complication of COVID-19 yet remains poorly characterized. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with COVID-19-related encephalopathy presenting as expressive aphasia and inattentiveness, subsequently progressing to agitation and marked confusion. Brain MRI and CSF analysis were unremarkable, while EEG showed slowing with frontal sharp waves. Neuropsychiatric symptoms resolved following treatment with tocilizumab. CNS involvement in COVID-19 may present as a subacute encephalopathy characterized by prominent frontal lobe dysfunction, with language disturbances as first neurological manifestation. Future studies should further investigate the role of tocilizumab in treating COVID-19-related encephalopathy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Aphasia/etiology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
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