Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 21(11): 61, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2129135

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Aphasia is an acquired neurological language disorder after brain damages. Persons with aphasia (PWA) are more susceptible to behavioral and emotional implications due to inherent communication and/or cognitive difficulties. Currently, little is known regarding the impact of COVID-19 on PWA. RECENT FINDINGS: There are now growing reports with evidence of neurological and dysexecutive syndromes subsequent to interference of brain functions in acute patients with COVID-19, leading to variable aphasia-like symptoms. COVID-19 affected chronic PWA more in terms of disrupted communication and daily routines, worsened psychosocial well-being, and difficulties getting aphasia services that adequately addressed their needs. Acute versus chronic PWA were disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Recognizing, examining, and managing COVID-19-related neurological and behavioral problems in PWA is not straightforward. As we passed the 1-year mark and approaching the 2-year mark of the onset of COVID-19, more research is necessary to prioritize strategies for improving current evidence-based care and rehabilitation of aphasia.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , COVID-19 , Aphasia/etiology , Communication , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(2): 881-895, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788329

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The use of telepractice in the field of communication disorders offers an opportunity to provide care for those with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). The Western Aphasia Battery-Revised (WAB-R) is used for differential diagnosis, to assess severity of aphasia, and to identify a language profile of strengths and challenges. Telehealth administration of the WAB-R is supported for those with chronic aphasia due to stroke but has not yet been systematically explored in neurodegenerative dementia syndromes. To fill this gap, in-person and telehealth performance on the WAB-R from participants with mild to moderate PPA was compared. METHOD: Nineteen participants with mild to moderate PPA were administered the WAB-R in person and over videoconferencing. Videoconferencing administration included modifications to the testing protocol to ensure smooth completion of the assessment. Subtest and Aphasia Quotient (WAB-AQ) summary scores were compared using concordance coefficients to measure the relationship between the administration modes. RESULTS: In-person and telehealth scores showed strong concordance for the WAB-AQ, Auditory Verbal Comprehension subtest, and Naming & Word Finding subtest. The Spontaneous Speech test summary score had slightly lower concordance, indicating the need for caution when comparing these scores across administration modes. CONCLUSION: These findings support extending the use of telehealth administration of the WAB-R via videoconferencing to those with mild to moderate PPA given appropriate modifications to testing protocol.


Subject(s)
Aphasia, Primary Progressive , Aphasia , Aphasia/diagnosis , Aphasia/etiology , Aphasia, Primary Progressive/diagnosis , Humans , Language , Language Tests , Reproducibility of Results
3.
J Integr Neurosci ; 21(1): 8, 2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687835

ABSTRACT

We report on our remote speech therapy experience in post-stroke aphasia. The aim was to test the feasibility and utility of telerehabilitation to support future randomized controlled trials. Post-stroke aphasia is a common and disabling speech disorder, which significantly affects patients' and caregivers' health and quality of life. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, most of the conventional speech therapy approaches had to stop or "switch" into telerehabilitation procedures to ensure the safety of patients and operators but, concomitantly, the best rehabilitation level possible. Here, we planned a 5-month telespeech therapy programme, twice per week, of a patient with non-fluent aphasia following an intracerebral haemorrhage. Overall, treatment adherence based on the operator's assessments was high, and incomplete adherence for technical problems occurred very rarely. In line with the patient's feedback, acceptability was also positive, since he was constantly motivated during the sessions and the exercises performed autonomously, as confirmed by the speech therapist and caregiver, respectively. Moreover, despite the sequelae from the cerebrovascular event, evident in some writing tests due to the motor deficits in his right arm and the disadvantages typical of all telepractices, more relevant results were achieved during the telerehabilitation period compared to those of the "face-to-face" therapy before the COVID-19 outbreak. The telespeech therapy performed can be considered successful and the patient was able to return to work. Concluding, we support it as a feasible approach offering patients and their families the opportunity to continue the speech and language rehabilitation pathway, even at the time of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aphasia/rehabilitation , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Stroke/complications , Telerehabilitation , Aphasia/etiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Language Therapy/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Speech Therapy/methods , Treatment Outcome
4.
J Neuroimmunol ; 349: 577400, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792960

ABSTRACT

Encephalopathy is emerging as a recurrent complication of COVID-19 yet remains poorly characterized. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with COVID-19-related encephalopathy presenting as expressive aphasia and inattentiveness, subsequently progressing to agitation and marked confusion. Brain MRI and CSF analysis were unremarkable, while EEG showed slowing with frontal sharp waves. Neuropsychiatric symptoms resolved following treatment with tocilizumab. CNS involvement in COVID-19 may present as a subacute encephalopathy characterized by prominent frontal lobe dysfunction, with language disturbances as first neurological manifestation. Future studies should further investigate the role of tocilizumab in treating COVID-19-related encephalopathy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Aphasia/etiology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL