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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572496

ABSTRACT

In humans, over-activation of innate immunity in response to viral or bacterial infections often causes severe illness and death. Furthermore, similar mechanisms related to innate immunity can cause pathogenesis and death in sepsis, massive trauma (including surgery and burns), ischemia/reperfusion, some toxic lesions, and viral infections including COVID-19. Based on the reviewed observations, we suggest that such severe outcomes may be manifestations of a controlled suicidal strategy protecting the entire population from the spread of pathogens and from dangerous pathologies rather than an aberrant hyperstimulation of defense responses. We argue that innate immunity may be involved in the implementation of an altruistic programmed death of an organism aimed at increasing the well-being of the whole community. We discuss possible ways to suppress this atavistic program by interfering with innate immunity and suggest that combating this program should be a major goal of future medicine.


Subject(s)
Altruism , Apoptosis/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Death/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Humans , Inflammasomes/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/immunology
2.
J Infect Dis ; 224(8): 1333-1344, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lymphopenia is a key feature for adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although it is rarely observed in children. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. METHODS: Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses were used to compare the apoptotic rate of T cells from COVID-19 adults and children and apoptotic responses of adult and child T cells to COVID-19 pooled plasma. Biological properties of caspases and reactive oxygen species were assessed in T cells treated by COVID-19 pooled plasma. RESULTS: Mitochondria apoptosis of peripheral T cells were identified in COVID-19 adult patient samples but not in the children. Furthermore, increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in COVID-19 plasma induced mitochondria apoptosis and caused deoxyribonucleic acid damage by elevating reactive oxygen species levels of the adult T cells. However, the child T cells showed tolerance to mitochondrial apoptosis due to mitochondria autophagy. Activation of autophagy could decrease apoptotic sensitivity of the adult T cells to plasma from COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in T cells of COVID-19 adult patients specifically, which may shed light on the pathophysiological difference between adults and children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphopenia/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Autophagy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondria/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
3.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e922281, 2020 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a sudden and serious disease with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is a novel target for inflammatory disease, and ibudilast (IBU), a PDE4 inhibitor, inhibits inflammatory response. Our study investigated the effect of IBU on the pathogenesis of neonatal ARDS and the underlying mechanism related to it. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of PDE4, CXCR4, SDF-1, CXCR5, CXCL1, inflammatory cytokines, and proteins related to cell apoptosis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the pathological morphology of lung tissue. Pulmonary edema score was used to assess the degree of lung water accumulation after pulmonary injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1) in serum. TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS Increased expression of PDE4 was observed in an LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model, and IBU ameliorated LPS-induced pathological manifestations and pulmonary edema in lung tissue. In addition, IBU attenuated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by inactivating the chemokine axis in the LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model. Finally, IBU significantly reduced LPS-induced cell apoptosis in lung tissue. CONCLUSIONS IBU, a PDE4 inhibitor, protected against ARDS by interfering with pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis. Our findings provide a novel and promising strategy to regulate pulmonary inflammation in ARDS.


Subject(s)
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/pathology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
4.
Trends Endocrinol Metab ; 32(11): 875-889, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401891

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 encodes the structural proteins spike (S), envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N). The receptor-binding domain on the surface subunit S1 is responsible for attachment of the virus to angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is highly expressed in host cells. The cytokine storm observed in patients with COVID-19 contributes to the endothelial vascular dysfunction, which can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiorgan failure, alteration in iron homeostasis, and death. Growth and differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), which belongs to the transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) superfamily of proteins, has a pivotal role in the development and progression of diseases because of its role as a metabolic regulator. In COVID-19, GDF15 activity increases in response to tissue damage. GDF15 appears to be a strong predictor of poor outcomes in patients critically ill with COVID-19 and acts as an 'inflammation-induced central mediator of tissue tolerance' via its metabolic properties. In this review, we examine the potential properties of GDF15 as an emerging modulator of immunity in COVID-19 in association with iron metabolism. The virus life cycle in host cell provides potential targets for drug therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Growth Differentiation Factor 15/immunology , Iron/metabolism , Apoptosis/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors/immunology , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors/metabolism , Growth Differentiation Factor 15/metabolism , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Oxidative Stress/immunology , Prognosis , Pyroptosis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis ; 1867(12): 166260, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection-induced inflammatory responses are largely responsible for the death of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. However, the mechanism by which SARS-CoV-2 triggers inflammatory responses remains unclear. Here, we aimed to explore the regulatory role of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein in infected cells and attempted to elucidate the molecular mechanism of SARS-CoV-2-induced inflammation. METHODS: SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudovirions (SCV-2-S) were generated using the spike-expressing virus packaging system. Western blot, mCherry-GFP-LC3 labeling, immunofluorescence, and RNA-seq were performed to examine the regulatory mechanism of SCV-2-S in autophagic response. The effects of SCV-2-S on apoptosis were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), Western blot, and flow cytometry analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was carried out to examine the mechanism of SCV-2-S in inflammatory responses. RESULTS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-mediated SCV-2-S infection induced autophagy and apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells. Mechanistically, SCV-2-S inhibited the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway by upregulating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, thus promoting the autophagic response. Ultimately, SCV-2-S-induced autophagy triggered inflammatory responses and apoptosis in infected cells. These findings not only improve our understanding of the mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced pathogenic inflammation but also have important implications for developing anti-inflammatory therapies, such as ROS and autophagy inhibitors, for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Apoptosis/immunology , Autophagy/physiology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Vero Cells
7.
J Infect Dis ; 224(8): 1333-1344, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lymphopenia is a key feature for adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although it is rarely observed in children. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. METHODS: Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses were used to compare the apoptotic rate of T cells from COVID-19 adults and children and apoptotic responses of adult and child T cells to COVID-19 pooled plasma. Biological properties of caspases and reactive oxygen species were assessed in T cells treated by COVID-19 pooled plasma. RESULTS: Mitochondria apoptosis of peripheral T cells were identified in COVID-19 adult patient samples but not in the children. Furthermore, increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in COVID-19 plasma induced mitochondria apoptosis and caused deoxyribonucleic acid damage by elevating reactive oxygen species levels of the adult T cells. However, the child T cells showed tolerance to mitochondrial apoptosis due to mitochondria autophagy. Activation of autophagy could decrease apoptotic sensitivity of the adult T cells to plasma from COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in T cells of COVID-19 adult patients specifically, which may shed light on the pathophysiological difference between adults and children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphopenia/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Autophagy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondria/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 631821, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344260

ABSTRACT

Neutrophils or polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are key participants in the innate immune response for their ability to execute different effector functions. These cells express a vast array of membrane receptors that allow them to recognize and eliminate infectious agents effectively and respond appropriately to microenvironmental stimuli that regulate neutrophil functions, such as activation, migration, generation of reactive oxygen species, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and mediator secretion, among others. Currently, it has been realized that activated neutrophils can accomplish their effector functions and simultaneously activate mechanisms of cell death in response to different intracellular or extracellular factors. Although several studies have revealed similarities between the mechanisms of cell death of neutrophils and other cell types, neutrophils have distinctive properties, such as a high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), that are important for their effector function in infections and pathologies such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and immunodeficiencies, influencing their cell death mechanisms. The present work offers a synthesis of the conditions and molecules implicated in the regulation and activation of the processes of neutrophil death: apoptosis, autophagy, pyroptosis, necroptosis, NETosis, and necrosis. This information allows to understand the duality encountered by PMNs upon activation. The effector functions are carried out to eliminate invading pathogens, but in several instances, these functions involve activation of signaling cascades that culminate in the death of the neutrophil. This process guarantees the correct elimination of pathogenic agents, damaged or senescent cells, and the timely resolution of the inflammation that is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in the organism. In addition, they alert the organism when the immunological system is being deregulated, promoting the activation of other cells of the immune system, such as B and T lymphocytes, which produce cytokines that potentiate the microbicide functions.


Subject(s)
Cell Death/immunology , Neutrophils/pathology , Apoptosis/immunology , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/metabolism , Autophagy/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Free Radicals/metabolism , Humans , Necroptosis/immunology , Necrosis/immunology , Necrosis/metabolism , Neutrophil Activation , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Phagocytosis/immunology , Pyroptosis/immunology , Receptors, Death Domain/metabolism
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256559

ABSTRACT

Ceramide is a lipid messenger at the heart of sphingolipid metabolism. In concert with its metabolizing enzymes, particularly sphingomyelinases, it has key roles in regulating the physical properties of biological membranes, including the formation of membrane microdomains. Thus, ceramide and its related molecules have been attributed significant roles in nearly all steps of the viral life cycle: they may serve directly as receptors or co-receptors for viral entry, form microdomains that cluster entry receptors and/or enable them to adopt the required conformation or regulate their cell surface expression. Sphingolipids can regulate all forms of viral uptake, often through sphingomyelinase activation, and mediate endosomal escape and intracellular trafficking. Ceramide can be key for the formation of viral replication sites. Sphingomyelinases often mediate the release of new virions from infected cells. Moreover, sphingolipids can contribute to viral-induced apoptosis and morbidity in viral diseases, as well as virus immune evasion. Alpha-galactosylceramide, in particular, also plays a significant role in immune modulation in response to viral infections. This review will discuss the roles of ceramide and its related molecules in the different steps of the viral life cycle. We will also discuss how novel strategies could exploit these for therapeutic benefit.


Subject(s)
Ceramides/metabolism , HIV-1/metabolism , Influenza A virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Ceramides/chemistry , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunomodulation , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virion/growth & development , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/immunology
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3010, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237999

ABSTRACT

Resident memory T cells (TRM) positioned within the respiratory tract are probably required to limit SARS-CoV-2 spread and COVID-19. Importantly, TRM are mostly non-recirculating, which reduces the window of opportunity to examine these cells in the blood as they move to the lung parenchyma. Here, we identify circulating virus-specific T cell responses during acute infection with functional, migratory and apoptotic patterns modulated by viral proteins and associated with clinical outcome. Disease severity is associated predominantly with IFNγ and IL-4 responses, increased responses against S peptides and apoptosis, whereas non-hospitalized patients have increased IL-12p70 levels, degranulation in response to N peptides and SARS-CoV-2-specific CCR7+ T cells secreting IL-10. In convalescent patients, lung-TRM are frequently detected even 10 months after initial infection, in which contemporaneous blood does not reflect tissue-resident profiles. Our study highlights a balanced anti-inflammatory antiviral response associated with a better outcome and persisting TRM cells as important for future protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lung/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Apoptosis/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Movement/immunology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-4/immunology , Interleukin-4/metabolism , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
11.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1589-1598, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196482

ABSTRACT

A novel member of human coronavirus, named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been recently recognized in China and rapidly spread worldwide. Studies showed the decreasing of peripheral blood lymphocytes in a majority of patients. In this study, we have reported the clinical features, laboratory characteristics, the frequency of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations, and their apoptosis pattern in Iranian coronavirus infectious disease (COVID-19) patients. Demographic and clinical data of 61 hospitalized confirmed cases with COVID-19 at Imam Khomeini Hospital were collected and analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from all samples and the apoptosis pattern was evaluated using Annexin V/propidium iodide method. The frequency of lymphocyte subsets, including T-CD4+ , T-CD8+ , NK, B cells, and monocytes, was measured in all patients and 31 controls by flow cytometry. Our findings demonstrated that the percentage of lymphocytes, CD4+ , and CD8+ T cells were decreased in COVID-19 patients compared with the control group. Regarding the clinical severity, the number of lymphocytes, CD4+ , CD8+ T cells, and NK cells were also decreased in severe cases when compared with mild cases. Finally, our data have also indicated the increase in apoptosis of mononuclear cells from COVID-19 patients which was more remarkable in severe clinical cases. The frequency of immune cells is a useful indicator for prediction of severity and prognosis of COVID-19 patients. These results could help to explain the immunopathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 and introducing novel biomarkers, therapeutic strategies, and vaccine candidates.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , Immunophenotyping/methods , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Iran , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged
12.
Cell Rep ; 34(11): 108863, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108116

ABSTRACT

It is unclear why some SARS-CoV-2 patients readily resolve infection while others develop severe disease. By interrogating metabolic programs of immune cells in severe and recovered coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients compared with other viral infections, we identify a unique population of T cells. These T cells express increased Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 (VDAC1), accompanied by gene programs and functional characteristics linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. The percentage of these cells increases in elderly patients and correlates with lymphopenia. Importantly, T cell apoptosis is inhibited in vitro by targeting the oligomerization of VDAC1 or blocking caspase activity. We also observe an expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells with unique metabolic phenotypes specific to COVID-19, and their presence distinguishes severe from mild disease. Overall, the identification of these metabolic phenotypes provides insight into the dysfunctional immune response in acutely ill COVID-19 patients and provides a means to predict and track disease severity and/or design metabolic therapeutic regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Immunity/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Apoptosis/immunology , Caspases/immunology , Caspases/metabolism , Female , Humans , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondria/metabolism , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1/metabolism , Young Adult
13.
Front Immunol ; 11: 600405, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013339

ABSTRACT

Aberrant T cell differentiation and lymphopenia are hallmarks of severe COVID-19 disease. Since T cells must race to cull infected cells, they are quick to differentiate and achieve cytotoxic function. With this responsiveness, comes hastened apoptosis, due to a coupled mechanism of death and differentiation in both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes via CD95 (Fas) and serine-threonine kinase (Akt). T cell lymphopenia in severe cases may represent cell death or peripheral migration. These facets depict SARS-Cov-2 as a lympho-manipulative pathogen; it distorts T cell function, numbers, and death, and creates a dysfunctional immune response. Whether preservation of T cells, prevention of their aberrant differentiation, and expansion of their population may alter disease course is unknown. Its investigation requires experimental interrogation of the linked differentiation and death pathway by agents known to uncouple T cell proliferation and differentiation in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , fas Receptor/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans
14.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 235, 2020 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841900

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can lead to respiratory illness and multi-organ failure in critically ill patients. Although the virus-induced lung damage and inflammatory cytokine storm are believed to be directly associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical manifestations, the underlying mechanisms of virus-triggered inflammatory responses are currently unknown. Here we report that SARS-CoV-2 infection activates caspase-8 to trigger cell apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine processing in the lung epithelial cells. The processed inflammatory cytokines are released through the virus-induced necroptosis pathway. Virus-induced apoptosis, necroptosis, and inflammation activation were also observed in the lung sections of SARS-CoV-2-infected HFH4-hACE2 transgenic mouse model, a valid model for studying SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. Furthermore, analysis of the postmortem lung sections of fatal COVID-19 patients revealed not only apoptosis and necroptosis but also massive inflammatory cell infiltration, necrotic cell debris, and pulmonary interstitial fibrosis, typical of immune pathogenesis in the lung. The SARS-CoV-2 infection triggered a dual mode of cell death pathways and caspase-8-dependent inflammatory responses may lead to the lung damage in the COVID-19 patients. These discoveries might assist the development of therapeutic strategies to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Caspase 8/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Necroptosis/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Animals , COVID-19 , Caspase 8/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemokine CCL5/genetics , Chemokine CCL5/immunology , Chemokine CXCL10/genetics , Chemokine CXCL10/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-7/genetics , Interleukin-7/immunology , Interleukin-8/genetics , Interleukin-8/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
16.
Eur J Cancer ; 135: 62-65, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-605486

ABSTRACT

While confirmed cases of the deadly coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have exceeded 4.7 million globally, scientists are pushing forward with efforts to develop vaccines and treatments in an attempt to slow the pandemic and lessen the disease's damage. Although no proven effective therapies for treating patients with COVID-19 or for managing their complications currently exist, the rapidly expanding knowledge regarding severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and its interplay with hosts provides a significant number of potential drug targets and the potential to repurpose drugs already tested in other diseases. Herein, we report the biological rationale of immune-activating drugs and a brief summary of literature data on the potential therapeutic value of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have been recently tested beyond cancer treatment for their potential to restore cellular immunocompetence.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , B7-H1 Antigen/antagonists & inhibitors , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/virology , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Treatment Outcome
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