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2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 849560, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938616

ABSTRACT

Humorally associated autoimmune diseases generally show a female predominance whereas ankylosing spondylitis, a disease that overlaps with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), shows a male predominance. The present review ascertains the current knowledge of sex-specific differences related to psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic, inflammatory condition associated with psoriasis. Sex differences may have important implications for clinical research in PsA and in terms of epidemiology (incidence, prevalence, lifetime risk, survival, and mortality), clinical, radiological, and laboratory features, and response to treatment. While nationwide surveys and large-scale databases and registries show no sex-specific differences, varying male/female ratios have been reported, ranging from 0.42 to 2.75 (comparable with those reported for psoriasis vulgaris: ranging from 0.28 to 2.38). This may reflect subtle, complex, nonlinear interactions between the biological make-up of the individual (genetic and epigenetic differences), hormonal components including menopausal status, environmental exposures including skeletal physical stressing, and psychological variables. There exists methodological heterogeneity and paucity of data concerning sex-specific differences, in terms of the specific population studied, study design, and the diagnostic criteria utilized. Harmonizing and reconciling these discrepancies would be of crucial importance in achieving the ambitious goals of personalized/individualized medicine and further standardized meta-data and Big Data could help disentangle and elucidate the precise mechanisms of underlying potential PsA sex-specific differences.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Psoriasis , Spondylitis, Ankylosing , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Spondylitis, Ankylosing/diagnosis
3.
Int J Rheum Dis ; 25(8): 861-868, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We described the set-up of a new multidisciplinary psoriatic arthritis-psoriasis (PsA-PsO) clinic incorporating service, education, and research between rheumatologists and dermatologists for PsA. We describe the patients' and learners' experience of this shared-care model. METHODS: A PsA-PsO clinic was newly set up in 2019. Each patient was first seen by a trainee, followed by both a dermatologist and a rheumatologist simultaneously in the same consultation room. We collected patients' and learners' experience through self-administered surveys. RESULTS: From May 2019 to January 2020, we collected data from 44 visits (55% new referrals, 45% follow up) from 30 patients: 22.7% were referred for diagnostic doubts, 77.3% were for therapeutic issues. Eight of the 10 patients referred for diagnosis had PsA confirmed. Medication changes occurred in 63.6% of visits; 63.6% of patients continued follow up in the PsA-PsO clinic, and 36.4% were discharged back to the original respective care. The median (interquartile range) rating of patient satisfaction of the care was 8 (7-8) out of 10; 96.1% of patients would "probably" or "definitely recommend" the care to others. From 20 learners, 95% reported the experience as "extremely" or "very" beneficial to training. The PsA-PsO clinic was suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic from February 2020 because of lack of available staff. The service was resumed gradually from May 2021. CONCLUSION: Despite challenges, we report the set-up of a new care model between dermatologists and rheumatologists for care of patients with psoriatic disease. The care model was well received by patients. Learners from various levels reported benefit from the learning experience.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Psoriasis , Rheumatology , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/diagnosis
4.
J Dermatol ; 49(6): 624-628, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752454

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on biologic treatment for psoriasis in Japan remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate changes in biologic treatment and patients' behavior of visiting our department, especially in psoriasis patients treated with biologics before and during the pandemic. Data were collected from medical records retrospectively. The numbers of new psoriasis patients before (2019) and during (2020) the pandemic were compared. Patients' behavior of visiting our department was evaluated. The number of new psoriasis patients who visited our department in 2020 decreased by 35.7% compared with that in 2019. The reduction rate of new patients with psoriasis vulgaris was 49.3%, whereas the numbers of new patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) were almost the same in 2019 and 2020. The number of patients who newly initiated biologics did not decrease in 2020 compared with that in 2019. As of January 1, 2020, 215 psoriasis patients were treated with biologics. Six patients (2.8%) discontinued biologics treatment possibly due to COVID-19 in 2020. Among 212 patients with good adherence to visiting our department in the previous year, 24 patients (11.3%) refrained from their visits for at least 1 month. In most cases, refrainment was observed in April and May when the first state of emergency was in effect in Japan. In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic hindered patients from visiting our department. However, its impact on patients who needed intensive care, such as patients with PsA and GPP, and psoriasis patients treated with biologics, was limited.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Biological Products , COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous , Acute Disease , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
5.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(3): 351-358, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685504

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Risankizumab is an interleukin-23 inhibitor under study for the treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The phase 3 KEEPsAKE 2 trial investigated the efficacy and safety of risankizumab versus placebo in patients with active PsA who had previous inadequate response or intolerance to ≤2 biological therapies (Bio-IR) and/or ≥1 conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (csDMARD-IR). Results through week 24 are reported here. METHODS: Adults with PsA who were Bio-IR and/or csDMARD-IR were randomised to receive subcutaneously administered risankizumab 150 mg or placebo at weeks 0, 4 and 16 during a 24-week, double-blind treatment period. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved ≥20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology score (ACR20) at week 24. Secondary endpoints assessed key domains of PsA and patient-reported outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 444 patients (median age 53 years, range 23-84 years) were randomised to risankizumab (n=224) or placebo (n=220); 206 patients (46.5%) were Bio-IR. At week 24, a significantly greater proportion of patients receiving risankizumab achieved the primary endpoint of ACR20 (51.3% vs 26.5%, p<0.001) and all secondary endpoints (p<0.05) compared with placebo. Serious adverse events were reported for 4.0% and 5.5% of risankizumab-treated and placebo-treated patients, respectively; serious infections were reported for 0.9% and 2.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Treatment with risankizumab resulted in significant improvements versus placebo in key disease outcomes and was well tolerated in patients with PsA who were Bio-IR and/or csDMARD-IR. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03671148.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
6.
Intern Med ; 61(3): 433-438, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666884

ABSTRACT

Recently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, has spread worldwide. Although nearly all patients incur mild-to-moderate disease from this viral infection, some develop severe manifestations with a poor prognosis. COVID-19 can also induce autoimmune disease; several cases of arthritis following COVID-19 have been documented in the literature, such as reactive arthritis and chronic arthritis. We herein report a case of psoriatic arthritis triggered by COVID-19. Although the arthritis had been refractory to glucocorticoids and methotrexate, certolizumab pegol subsequently led to remission.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Certolizumab Pegol , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/virology , COVID-19/complications , Certolizumab Pegol/therapeutic use , Humans , Polyethylene Glycols/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
7.
Clin Rheumatol ; 41(5): 1271-1283, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653525

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine encompasses a variety of modalities that allow for the remote assessment and treatment of patients. The technologies, services, and tools available for telemedicine in the USA are increasingly becoming an integral part of the healthcare system to bridge the gaps in care that can arise from geographic and/or socioeconomic obstacles and provider shortages. Telemedicine can be applied to a spectrum of clinical areas, including rheumatic diseases. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominately skin and joint manifestations. PsA is often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed, which can lead to worse patient outcomes, including irreversible joint erosion and damage. The difficulties in diagnosing and managing PsA are confounded by the emergence and increased use of telemedicine because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine presents the opportunity to increase access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists to improve training and education regarding PsA and to decrease time attributed to office visits associated with PsA. However, challenges in diagnosing PsA without a thorough in-person physical examination by a trained rheumatologist or dermatologist exist. We provide an overview of the ways telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for patients with PsA; characteristic clinical features of PsA, with a focus on skin and joint signs and symptoms; screening tools to be used in routine clinical care; assessments that can be used to evaluate quality of life, functional ability, and disease activity in PsA; and resources and recommendations for the development of future telemedicine use in rheumatology and dermatology. Key Points • Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed. • Telemedicine can improve access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists. • Telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for managing PsA.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Psoriasis , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Dermatologists , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Rheumatologists
8.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(2): 225-231, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622014

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risankizumab, a biological therapy that inhibits interleukin 23, in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have responded inadequately or are intolerant to ≥1 conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (csDMARD). METHODS: In the randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind KEEPsAKE 1 trial, 964 patients with active PsA were randomised (1:1) to receive risankizumab 150 mg or placebo at weeks 0, 4 and 16. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving ≥20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR20) at week 24. Here, we report the results from the 24-week double-blind period; the open-label period with all patients receiving risankizumab is ongoing. RESULTS: At week 24, a significantly greater proportion of patients receiving risankizumab achieved the primary endpoint of ACR20 (57.3% vs placebo, 33.5%; p<0.001). Significant differences were also observed for risankizumab versus placebo for the first eight ranked secondary endpoints, including skin and nail psoriasis endpoints, minimal disease activity and resolution of enthesitis and dactylitis (p<0.001). Adverse events and serious adverse events were reported at similar rates in the risankizumab and placebo groups. Serious infections were reported for 1.0% and 1.2% of patients receiving risankizumab and placebo, respectively. There was one death in the risankizumab group (urosepsis deemed unrelated to the study drug). CONCLUSIONS: Risankizumab treatment results in significantly greater improvement of signs and symptoms of PsA compared with placebo and is well tolerated in patients with active PsA who have responded inadequately or are intolerant to ≥1 csDMARD. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03675308.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
9.
RMD Open ; 8(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Scanty data on the immunogenicity of the BNT162b2 vaccine in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) on Tumor Necrosis Factor inhibitors (TNFi) have been published. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the humoral response to BNT162b2 vaccination patients with PsA on TNFi, comparing immunogenicity with healthy controls. METHODS: Forty patients with classified PsA on TNFi undergoing vaccination with the BNT162b2 mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (BioNTech/Pfizer) were enrolled. Fifteen days after the second shot, serum IgG levels against SARS-CoV-2 (Abbott ARCHITECT i2000SR, positivity cut-off 50 AU/mL) were assayed in all patients. Clinimetrics and treatment data were gathered. TNFi treatment was not discontinued throughout the whole period, whereas methotrexate (MTX) was discontinued for 1 week after each shot in those on combination therapy. Sera from healthcare professionals were considered as healthy controls for 1:1 propensity score matching; any of them was taking medication.Student's t-test and logistic regression were used for investigating differences in immunogenicity between groups and predictors of antibody response. RESULTS: Clinical Disease Activity Index did not change before and after vaccination (7.06±5.23 to 7.10±5.27, p=0.92).Patients with PsA achieved a positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG level with a mean (±SD) of 13794.44±15 815.42 AU/mL. Although lower, the antibody level was not significantly different from matched controls (19227.4±11.8460.45 AU/mL, p=0.08). In the overall sample, those on MTX (12/80, 15%) had a trend toward lower immune response (p=0.07); glucocorticoid therapy (11/80, 13.8%) predicted lower antibody levels (p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Continuing TNFi in patients with PsA throughout the vaccination did not hamper immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors
10.
RMD Open ; 7(3)2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare current all-cause mortality rates in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) versus general population. METHODS: In this population-based, retrospective cohort study, anonymised data on 11 186 586 citizens, including all patients with RA (42 735, 79% female), AS (9707, 43% female), PsA (13 779, 55% female), SLE (10 440, 89% female) and SSc (2277, 88% female), (median age of 64/47/54/53/59 years at study entry, respectively), under prescribed treatment between 2015 and 2019, were extracted from the electronic database covering nearly 99% of the Greek population. RESULTS: After 1:5 (patients:general population) matching for gender/age, we found that survival was worse in SSc, followed by SLE and inflammatory arthritis. Compared with the general population HRs for death increased from the first 3 years to 5 years of observation possibly due to increases in disease duration: RA (from 0.63 to 1.13 (95% CI: 1.05 to 1.22), AS (from 0.62 to 1.01, (95% CI: 0.76 to 1.33)), PsA (from 0.68 to 1.06, (95% CI: 0.88 to 1.28)), SLE (from 1.52 to 1.98, (95% CI: 1.67 to 2.33)) and SSc (from 2.27 to 4.24, (95% CI: 3.19 to 5.63)). In both SLE and SSc mortality was increased in men than women and in patients younger than 50 years. CONCLUSIONS: Survival rates over 5 years in inflammatory arthritis under treatment are currently becoming comparable (AS/PsA) or slightly higher (RA) than those of the general population. However, all-cause mortality is almost twofold and fourfold higher in SLE and SSc, respectively, being even higher for male and younger patients.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Rheumatic Diseases , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy
11.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(7): 1253-1261, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212857

ABSTRACT

Close follow-up is mandatory in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, rheumatological care was rapidly reorganized during the first peak from March 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020, and all patients with RA, PsA, and AS being treated with a subcutaneous biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug or oral targeted synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug were followed remotely. A retrospective database analysis of these 431 patients before and after this period is presented herein. A rheumatologist directly contacted all patients by telephone. Patients could also enter data on patient-reported outcomes remotely using the digital platform iAR Plus. General health (GH) and visual analog scale (VAS) pain were the main outcomes along with FACIT and disease-specific questionnaires (RADAI, ROAD, PROCLARA for RA, and BASDAI, BASGI, BASFI for AS). In all, 449 visits were postponed (69.9% of all scheduled visits); telephone evaluation was deemed inadequate in 193 instances, and patients underwent a standard outpatient visit. Comparing patients on telemedicine to those who underwent hospital visits, we found no statistically significant differences in GH (35.3 vs 39.3; p = 0.24), VAS (33.3 vs 37.1; p = 0.29), or other specific outcome measures in patients with RA, PsA, or AS. These results show that telemedicine has undoubted benefits, and in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is likely that many patients with these diseases may prefer it.


Subject(s)
Arthritis/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Retrospective Studies , Spondylitis, Ankylosing/drug therapy
12.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 33(4): 356-362, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201983

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide an overview of the recent research publications on educational needs of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and the associated challenges. RECENT FINDINGS: The rate of good treatment adherence in PsA can be as low as 57.7% and successful patient education can help improve treatment adherence. Also, 78.7% of patients who stopped their disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did so without the advice of their clinician. In delivering educational needs, the aspects of disease process, treatment, self-help measures, managing pain, movement, psychological and social needs should all be addressed, whilst at the same time, recognising that PsA patients with multidomain disease, are likely to be dealing with more than just pain. Arthritis self-care management education is potentially beneficial, but up to 11% of educational YouTube videos may contain misleading patient opinion and many existing apps do not meet the needs of the patients with PsA. SUMMARY: Significant room for improvement exists in treatment adherence in PsA and patient education addressing the relevant educational needs could assist with this issue. However, patients should be advised to be wary of internet videos and other educational aids that were not created by health professionals.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Health Services Needs and Demand , Medication Adherence , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics
15.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(2): 238-241, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066832

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the transient reduction in rheumatology services imposed by virus containment measures during the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with disease worsening in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Patient-reported disease activity assessed during face-to-face visits and/or via a smartphone application were compared between three periods of each 2 months duration (before, during and after the COVID-19-wave) from January to June 2020 in 666 patients with axSpA, RA and PsA in the Swiss Clinical Quality Management cohort. RESULTS: The number of consultations dropped by 52%, whereas the number of remote assessments increased by 129%. The proportion of patients with drug non-compliance slightly increased during the pandemic, the difference reaching statistical significance in axSpA (19.9% vs 13.2% before the pandemic, p=0.003). The proportion of patients with disease flares remained stable (<15%). There was no increase in mean values of the Bath Ankylosing Disease Activity Index, the Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index-5 and the Patient Global Assessment in patients with axSpA, RA and PsA, respectively. CONCLUSION: A short interruption of in-person patient-rheumatologist interactions had no major detrimental impact on the disease course of axSpA, RA and PsA as assessed by patient-reported outcomes.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic/physiopathology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Spondylarthropathies/physiopathology , Symptom Flare Up , Adult , Aged , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Medication Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Rheumatic Diseases/physiopathology , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2 , Smartphone , Spondylarthropathies/drug therapy , Switzerland
18.
RMD Open ; 7(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011014

ABSTRACT

AIMS: In Danish patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases to explore self-protection strategies and health behaviour including adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic treatment (DMARD) during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and again after the reopening of the society started. Furthermore, to identify characteristics of patients with high levels of anxiety and self-isolation. METHODS: Patients in routine care followed prospectively in the nationwide DANBIO registry were invited to answer an online questionnaire regarding disease activity and COVID-19 infection, behaviour in March and June 2020. Responses were linked to patient data in DANBIO. Characteristics potentially associated with anxiety, self-isolation and medication adherence (gender/age/diagnosis/education/work status/comorbidity/DMARD/smoking/EQ-5D/disease activity) were explored with multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: We included 12 789 patients (8168 rheumatoid arthritis/2068 psoriatic arthritis/1758 axial spondyloarthritis/795 other) of whom 65% were women and 36% treated with biological DMARD. Self-reported COVID-19 prevalence was 0.3%. Patients reported that they were worried to get COVID-19 infection (March/June: 70%/45%) and self-isolated more than others of the same age (48%/38%). The fraction of patients who changed medication due to fear of COVID-19 were 4.1%/0.6%. Female gender, comorbidities, not working, lower education, biological treatment and poor European Quality of life, 5 dimensions were associated with both anxiety and self-isolation. CONCLUSION: In >12 000 patients with inflammatory arthritis, we found widespread anxiety and self-isolation, but high medication adherence, in the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. This persisted during the gradual opening of society during the following months. Attention to patients' anxiety and self-isolation is important during this and potential future epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Pandemics , Rheumatic Diseases/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Anxiety/epidemiology , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Psoriatic/psychology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Medication Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology , Spondylarthropathies/drug therapy , Spondylarthropathies/epidemiology , Spondylarthropathies/psychology
19.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e13961, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1010808

ABSTRACT

Immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory treatments are critical for the management of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions such as psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Similar to those illnesses, the lung injury and acute respiratory distress shown in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients are the result of a disruption in the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This hyperinflammatory response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), associated with the severity of the coronavirus disease, is called the cytokine storm. There is a growing concern regarding how patients on immunosuppressant biologic therapies might be at higher risk of being infected and whether they need to discontinue their treatment preemptively. Clinical data on COVID-19-infected patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis are still scarce. Here, we presented seven cases of these type of patients. The patient infected with COVID-19 on apremilast and the one on apremilast with infected spouse showed the best safety profile and mildest symptoms. One of the secukinumab patients also presented a relatively good outcome. Infliximab patients and the one with serious comorbidities showed the worst outcome. Even though more clinical data are yet needed to draw strong conclusions, apremilast could be a safer alternative for dermatology and rheumatology patients in case of clinically important active infection.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Thalidomide/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antirheumatic Agents/administration & dosage , Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Infliximab/administration & dosage , Infliximab/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Spain , Thalidomide/administration & dosage , Thalidomide/adverse effects
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