Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 110
Filter
1.
J Int Med Res ; 50(4): 3000605221090363, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779533

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has been used during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of its reported anti-viral activity. This study examined the association of chronic HCQ use with the incidence and complications of COVID-19. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included adults with rheumatoid arthritis and/or systemic lupus erythematosus who visited rheumatology clinics in three tertiary hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2019 and December 2020. Patients were categorized into two groups based on HCQ use. Data were obtained from the electronic health record and by interviews with patients. The primary study objective was the incidence of COVID-19 and its complications from March 2020 to February 2021. RESULTS: Almost 11% of the study cohort was positive for COVID-19, and the incidence of COVID-19 was similar between HCQ users (11.11%) and nonusers (10.86%). Disease complication rates were similar in the study arms, and they mainly included fever, dry cough, fatigue, and breathing difficulty. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed no significant association between chronic HCQ use and the incidence of COVID-19, and disease complications were similar in the study arms.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Adult , Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
2.
RMD Open ; 8(1)2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774982

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess antibody and T cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). METHODS: This prospective study recruited 100 patients with RA on a variety of DMARDs for antibody and T cell analysis, pre-vaccination and 4 weeks post-vaccination. Positive antibody response was defined as sera IgG binding to ≥1 antigen. Those that remained seronegative after first vaccination were retested 4 weeks after second vaccination; and if still seronegative after vaccination three. A T cell response was defined an ELISpot count of ≥7 interferon (IFN)γ-positive cells when exposed to spike antigens. Type I IFN activity was determined using the luminex multiplex assay IFN score. RESULTS: After vaccine one, in patients without prior SARS-CoV-2 exposure, 37/83 (45%) developed vaccine-specific antibody responses, 44/83 (53%) vaccine-specific T cell responses and 64/83 (77%) developed either antibody or T cell responses. Reduced seroconversion was seen with abatacept, rituximab (RTX) and those on concomitant methotrexate (MTX) compared to 100% for healthy controls (p<0.001). Better seroconversion occurred with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) versus RTX (p=0.012) and with age ≤50 (p=0.012). Pre-vaccine SARS-CoV-2 exposure was associated with higher quantitative seroconversion (≥3 antibodies) (p<0.001). In the subgroup of non-seroconverters, a second vaccination produced seroconversion in 54% (19/35), and after a third in 20% (2/10). IFN score analysis showed no change post-vaccine. CONCLUSION: Patients with RA on DMARDs have reduced vaccine responses, particularly on certain DMARDs, with improvement on subsequent vaccinations but with approximately 10% still seronegative after three doses.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes , Vaccination
3.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(3)2022 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736043

ABSTRACT

Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is one of the rare haematological syndromes more commonly reported in infants/children than adults. This disease is known for its aggressive dysregulated immune response affecting the host rapidly, causing multiorgan dysfunction and thus carries a high mortality. The disease still remains cryptic in this current decade despite all the developments in the ever-evolving field of haematology. Due to its rare occurrence and being more frequent in infants and the paediatric population, the literature lacks enough data to standardise therapies. Such events in adults and the elderly are invariably related to an underlying insult such as infections, other autoimmune or rheumatological diseases or drugs. We describe an interesting case of a middle-aged Caucasian woman who presented with fever, pancytopenia and hepatitis, who was eventually diagnosed with HLH just in time to receive the life-saving specific treatment as per available guidelines.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Child , Female , Fever/complications , Humans , Lamotrigine/therapeutic use , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/drug therapy , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , Middle Aged
4.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(5): 710-719, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685510

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the distinct impact of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) combination and monotherapy in immune response to an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: This phase 4 prospective study analysed seroconversion (SC) of anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralising antibodies (NAb) induced by the inactivated vaccine (CoronaVac) in patients with RA in comparison to controls (CG). Disease activity and treatment were also assessed. Only participants with baseline negative IgG/NAb were included. RESULTS: Patients with RA (N=260) and CG (N=104) had comparable median ages (59 years (50-65 years) vs 58 years (49.8-64 years), p=0.483). Patients with RA had moderate but lower SC (61.8% vs 94.2%, p<0.001) and NAb positivity (45% vs 78.6%, p<0.001) in comparison to CG after full vaccination. Baseline disease activity did not influence immunogenicity (p>0.05). After multivariate analyses, factors independently related to reduced SC were: older age (OR=0.79 (0.70-0.89) for each 5-year interval, p<0.001), methotrexate (OR=0.54 (0.29-0.98), p=0.044), abatacept (OR=0.37 (0.19-0.73), p=0.004) and number of DMARD (OR=0.55 (0.33-0.90), p=0.018). Regarding NAb, age (OR=0.87 (0.78-0.96) for each 5-year interval, p=0.007) and prednisone >7.5 mg/day (OR=0.38 (0.19-0.74), p=0.004) were negatively related to the presence of NAb. Further comparison of SC/NAb positivity among RA treatment subgroups and CG revealed that methotrexate/tofacitinib/abatacept/tocilizumab use, in monotherapy or in combination, resulted in lower responses (p<0.05), while tumour necrosis factor inhibitor and other conventional synthetic DMARD interfered solely when combined with other therapies. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with RA under DMARD have a moderate immunogenicity to CoronaVac. We identified that nearly all DMARD combinations have a deleterious effect in immunogenicity, whereas a more restricted number of drugs (methotrexate/tofacitinib/abatacept/tocilizumab) also hampered this response as monotherapy. These findings reinforce the need of a broader approach, not limited to specific drugs, to improve vaccine response for this population. TRIAL REGISTRATION DETAILS: NCT04754698.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Abatacept/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Vaccines, Inactivated
6.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(764-5): 69-73, 2022 Jan 19.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632257

ABSTRACT

In rheumatology, this year has seen an expansion of knowledge about the effects of COVID and the vaccine response in patients with autoimmune diseases, but also a re-examination of the usual doses of glucocorticoids in vasculitides and new treatments strategies for diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, spondylarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. New criteria for imaging assessment in spondylarthritis and new management guidelines for patients with low back pain have also been proposed.


En rhumatologie, dans les nouveautés que nous avons choisi de mettre en avant, cette année a vu l'élargissement des connaissances sur le Covid et la réponse vaccinale chez les patients avec maladies autoimmunes, la remise en question des doses habituelles des corticostéroïdes dans les vascularites et la possibilité de nouveaux traitements ou stratégies de prise en charge, dans le lupus érythémateux systémique, les spondylarthrites et la polyarthrite rhumatoïde. De nouveaux critères pour l'évaluation de l'imagerie des spondylarthrites ont aussi été proposés et des précisions quant au type de prise en charge nécessaire pour les patients lombalgiques ont également été apportées.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Rheumatology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 74(5): 733-740, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565158

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess trends in anxiety and interruptions in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) use among patients with rheumatic diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic and to evaluate whether DMARD interruptions were associated with disease flares. METHODS: ArthritisPower, the Vasculitis Patient-Powered Research Network, and other patient organizations invited members to join a 52-week longitudinal study, with baseline surveys completed March 29 to June 30, 2020, with follow-up through May 2021. Logistic regression incorporating generalized estimating equations evaluated associations between interruptions in DMARD use and self-reported disease flares at the next survey, adjusting for demographic characteristics, medications, disease, and calendar time. RESULTS: Among 2,424 patients completing a median of 5 follow-up surveys, the mean age was 57 years, 87% were female, and the most common conditions were rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and psoriatic arthritis. Average Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) anxiety T scores decreased from April 2020 (58.7) to May 2021 (53.7) (P < 0.001 for trend). Interruptions in DMARD use decreased from April (11.2%) to December 2020 (7.5%) (P < 0.001) but increased through May 2021 (14.0%) (P < 0.001). Interruptions in DMARD use were associated with a significant increase in severe flares (rated ≥6 of 10) at the next survey (12.9% versus 8.0% [odds ratio (OR) 1.71 (95% confidence interval [95% CI 1.23, 2.36]) although not any flare (OR 1.18 [95% CI 0.89, 1.58])]. CONCLUSION: Anxiety and interruptions in DMARD use initially decreased over time, but DMARD interruptions increased during 2021, possibly related to an increase in COVID-19 cases or vaccine availability. Interruptions in DMARD use were associated with increased rates of severe disease flares, highlighting the importance of avoiding unnecessary DMARD interruptions.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Vasculitis , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/diagnosis , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Symptom Flare Up , Vasculitis/drug therapy
9.
RMD Open ; 7(3)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551051

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases treated with rituximab (RTX) have more severe forms of COVID-19 compared with patients treated with anticytokine therapies, such as Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors. METHODS: We included all patients who were on either RTX or infliximab (IFX) in two Swiss cantons during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected self-reported symptoms compatible with COVID-19, PCR-confirmed diagnoses of COVID-19 and the evolution of COVID-19 infections. We computed the raw and propensity score-adjusted incidence of COVID-19 by treatment group. RESULTS: 190 patients were enrolled, of whom 121 (64%) were in the RTX group and 69 (36%) were in the IFX group. Twenty-one patients (11%) reported symptoms compatible with COVID-19 (RTX: 10, IFX: 11, p=0.14). Among patients with COVID-19 symptoms, four developed severe forms of the disease, with life-threatening pulmonary manifestations requiring intensive mechanical ventilation (RTX: 4 of 10, IFX: 0 of 11, Fisher's exact test p=0.04). The incidence rate of COVID-19 symptoms was 0.73 (95% CI 0.39 to 1.37) cases per 1000 patient-days on RTX vs 1.52 (95% CI 0.82 to 2.85) cases per 1000 patient-days on IFX (crude p=0.10, adjusted p=0.07). The incidence rate of severe COVID-19 was 0.28 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.7.2) cases per 1000 patient-days on RTX compared with null on IFX (95% CI 0.0 to 0.44) (p=0.13). A replication in an independent validation cohort confirmed these findings, with consistent results in the Swiss Clinical Quality Management registry. CONCLUSION: While the incidence of symptoms compatible with COVID-19 was overall similar in patients receiving RTX or IFX, the incidence of severe COVID-19 tended to be higher in the RTX group.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Humans , Incidence , Infliximab/adverse effects , Pandemics , Rituximab/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(3): 416-421, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541856

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the kinetics of humoral response after the first and second dose of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines in patients with inflammatory joint diseases compared with healthy controls (HC). To analyse factors influencing the quantity of the immune response. METHODS: We enrolled patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative spondyloarthritis (SpA), excluding those receiving B-cell depleting therapies and assessed the humoral response to mRNA vaccines after the first and the second dose of the vaccine in terms of seroconversion rate and titre. We compared the results to a HC group and analysed the influence of therapies as well as other characteristics on the humoral response. RESULTS: Samples from 53 patients with RA, 46 patients with SpA and 169 healthy participants were analysed. Seroconversion rates after the first immunisation were only 54% in patients with inflammatory arthritis compared with 98% in the HC group. However, seroconversion rates were 100% in all groups after second immunisation. Patients developed reduced antibody titres after the first vaccination compared with HC, but there was no difference after the second dose. While disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) monotherapy did not affect antibody levels, seroconversion rates as well as titre levels were reduced in patients receiving a combination of DMARDs compared with HC. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inflammatory joint diseases under DMARD therapy show impaired humoral responses to the first vaccine dose but excellent final responses to vaccination with mRNA vaccines. Therefore, the full course of two immunisations is necessary for efficient vaccination responses in patients with inflammatory arthritis under DMARD therapy.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spondylarthritis/immunology , Antirheumatic Agents/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Seroconversion/drug effects , Spondylarthritis/drug therapy
11.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(3): 433-439, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528535

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate absolute and relative risks for seasonal influenza outcomes in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJDs) and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). To contextualise recent findings on corresponding COVID-19 risks. METHODS: Using Swedish nationwide registers for this cohort study, we followed 116 989 patients with IJD and matched population comparators across four influenza seasons (2015-2019). We quantified absolute risks of hospitalisation and death due to influenza, and compared IJD to comparators via Cox regression. We identified 71 556 patients with IJD on active treatment with conventional synthetic DMARDs and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs)/targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (tsDMARDs) at the start of each influenza season, estimated risks for the same outcomes and compared these risks across DMARDs via Cox regression. RESULTS: Per season, average risks for hospitalisation listing influenza were 0.25% in IJD and 0.1% in the general population, corresponding to a crude HR of 2.38 (95% CI 2.21 to 2.56) that decreased to 1.44 (95% CI 1.33 to 1.56) following adjustments for comorbidities. For death listing influenza, the corresponding numbers were 0.015% and 0.006% (HR=2.63, 95% CI 1.93 to 3.58, and HR=1.46, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.01). Absolute risks for influenza outcomes were half (hospitalisation) and one-tenth (death) of those for COVID-19, but relative estimates comparing IJD to the general population were similar. CONCLUSIONS: In absolute terms, COVID-19 in IJD outnumbers that of average seasonal influenza, but IJD entails a 50%-100% increase in risk for hospitalisation and death for both types of infections, which is largely dependent on associated comorbidities. Overall, bDMARDs/tsDMARDs do not seem to confer additional risk for hospitalisation or death related to seasonal influenza.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/virology , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Influenza, Human/mortality , Aged , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seasons , Sweden/epidemiology
12.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(12): 1537-1544, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515258

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab is frequently applied in the treatment of lymphoma as well as autoimmune diseases and confers efficient depletion of recirculating B cells. Correspondingly, B cell-depleted patients barely mount de novo antibody responses during infections or vaccinations. Therefore, efficient immune responses of B cell-depleted patients largely depend on protective T cell responses. METHODS: CD8+ T cell expansion was studied in rituximab-treated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and B cell-deficient mice on vaccination/infection with different vaccines/pathogens. RESULTS: Rituximab-treated RA patients vaccinated with Influvac showed reduced expansion of influenza-specific CD8+ T cells when compared with healthy controls. Moreover, B cell-deficient JHT mice infected with mouse-adapted Influenza or modified vaccinia virus Ankara showed less vigorous expansion of virus-specific CD8+ T cells than wild type mice. Of note, JHT mice do not have an intrinsic impairment of CD8+ T cell expansion, since infection with vaccinia virus induced similar T cell expansion in JHT and wild type mice. Direct type I interferon receptor signalling of B cells was necessary to induce several chemokines in B cells and to support T cell help by enhancing the expression of MHC-I. CONCLUSIONS: Depending on the stimulus, B cells can modulate CD8+ T cell responses. Thus, B cell depletion causes a deficiency of de novo antibody responses and affects the efficacy of cellular response including cytotoxic T cells. The choice of the appropriate vaccine to vaccinate B cell-depleted patients has to be re-evaluated in order to efficiently induce protective CD8+ T cell responses.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Rituximab/adverse effects , Animals , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Mice , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Vaccinia/immunology , Vaccinia virus/immunology
13.
Biomolecules ; 11(11)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502359

ABSTRACT

Immune cells, including dendritic cells, macrophages, and T and B cells, express the vitamin D receptor and 1α-hydroxylase. In vitro studies have shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the active form of vitamin D, has an anti-inflammatory effect. Recent epidemiological evidence has indicated a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence, or aggravation, of infectious diseases and inflammatory autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. However, the impact of vitamin D on treatment and prevention, particularly in infectious diseases such as the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19), remains controversial. Here, we review recent evidence associated with the relationship between vitamin D and inflammatory diseases and describe the underlying immunomodulatory effect of vitamin D.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immune System/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Animals , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/prevention & control , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/prevention & control , Macrophages/immunology , Mice , Monocytes/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/prevention & control , Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics , Receptors, Calcitriol/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
14.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 5(2): 226-228, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493585

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a 61-year old female with a 20-year history of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed acute hepatitis. Her arthritis had been treated with methotrexate (MTX) since 2003 and, following an increase in disease activity, Rituximab (RTX) was commenced in January 2017. In May 2020, routine blood tests showed a new elevation in her liver profile, although synthetic function was preserved. A standard liver screen found no cause for her acutely abnormal lab values. Upon additional serological testing, the patient was confirmed to have acute hepatitis E virus (HEV). Her primary complaint at the time was fatigue. Within a month, her liver blood tests spontaneously improved and her symptoms resolved with conservative management.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Hepatitis E , Immunocompromised Host , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Female , Hepatitis E/diagnosis , Hepatitis E/immunology , Humans , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Rituximab/therapeutic use
15.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 101(Pt B): 108272, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487770

ABSTRACT

Auranofin (AF), a gold compound, has been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for more than 40 years; however, its mechanism of action remains unknown. We revealed that AF inhibited the induction of proinflammatory proteins and their mRNAs by the inflammatory stimulants, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and their upstream regulator, NF-κB. AF also activated the proteins peroxyredoxin-1, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1, and NF-E2-related factor 2, and inhibited thioredoxin reductase, all of which are involved in oxidative or electrophilic stress under physiological conditions. Although the cell membrane was previously considered to be permeable to AF because of its hydrophobicity, the mechanisms responsible for transporting AF into and out of cells as well as its effects on the uptake and excretion of other drugs have not yet been elucidated. Antibodies for cytokines have recently been employed in the treatment of RA, which has had an impact on the use of AF. Trials to repurpose AF as a risk-controlled agent to treat cancers or infectious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2/coronavirus disease 2019, are ongoing. Novel gold compounds are also under development as anti-cancer and anti-infection agents.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Auranofin/therapeutic use , Animals , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tuberculosis/drug therapy
16.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(10): e2129639, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473778

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are widely prescribed globally because of their ability to ameliorate shared immune pathways across immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs), the impact of COVID-19 among individuals with IMIDs who are receiving TNF inhibitors remains insufficiently understood. Objective: To examine the association between the receipt of TNF inhibitor monotherapy and the risk of COVID-19-associated hospitalization or death compared with other commonly prescribed immunomodulatory treatment regimens among adult patients with IMIDs. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study was a pooled analysis of data from 3 international COVID-19 registries comprising individuals with rheumatic diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis from March 12, 2020, to February 1, 2021. Clinicians directly reported COVID-19 outcomes as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of individuals with IMIDs and confirmed or suspected COVID-19 using online data entry portals. Adults (age ≥18 years) with a diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, or psoriasis were included. Exposures: Treatment exposure categories included TNF inhibitor monotherapy (reference treatment), TNF inhibitors in combination with methotrexate therapy, TNF inhibitors in combination with azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine therapy, methotrexate monotherapy, azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine monotherapy, and Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor monotherapy. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was COVID-19-associated hospitalization or death. Registry-level analyses and a pooled analysis of data across the 3 registries were conducted using multilevel multivariable logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics and accounting for country, calendar month, and registry-level correlations. Results: A total of 6077 patients from 74 countries were included in the analyses; of those, 3215 individuals (52.9%) were from Europe, 3563 individuals (58.6%) were female, and the mean (SD) age was 48.8 (16.5) years. The most common IMID diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (2146 patients [35.3%]) and Crohn disease (1537 patients [25.3%]). A total of 1297 patients (21.3%) were hospitalized, and 189 patients (3.1%) died. In the pooled analysis, compared with patients who received TNF inhibitor monotherapy, higher odds of hospitalization or death were observed among those who received a TNF inhibitor in combination with azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine therapy (odds ratio [OR], 1.74; 95% CI, 1.17-2.58; P = .006), azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine monotherapy (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.30-2.61; P = .001), methotrexate monotherapy (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.57-2.56; P < .001), and Jak inhibitor monotherapy (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.21-2.73; P = .004) but not among those who received a TNF inhibitor in combination with methotrexate therapy (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.85-1.63; P = .33). Similar findings were obtained in analyses that accounted for potential reporting bias and sensitivity analyses that excluded patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis based on symptoms alone. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, TNF inhibitor monotherapy was associated with a lower risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes compared with other commonly prescribed immunomodulatory treatment regimens among individuals with IMIDs.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Adult , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy, Combination/adverse effects , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 683694, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463469

ABSTRACT

Auranofin is an FDA-approved disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug that has been used for decades for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This gold(I) compound has anti-inflammatory properties because it reduces IL-6 expression via inhibition of the NF-κB-IL-6-STAT3 signaling pathway. Also, by inhibiting redox enzymes such as thioredoxin reductase, auranofin increases cellular oxidative stress and promotes apoptosis. Auranofin also possesses antiviral properties. Recently, it was reported that auranofin reduced by 95% SARS-CoV-2 RNA in infected human cells in vitro and decreased SARS-CoV-2-induced cytokine expression, including IL-6. During SARS-CoV-2 infection, a cytokine storm involving IL-6 increases severity of illness and worsens prognosis. Therefore, auranofin could, in our point of view, reduce pathology due to SARS-CoV-2-induced IL-6. COVID-19 is a rapidly-evolving respiratory disease now distributed worldwide. Strikingly high numbers of new COVID-19 cases are reported daily. We have begun a race to vaccinate people, but due to the complex logistics of this effort, the virus will continue to spread before all humans can be immunized, and new variants that may be less well contained by current vaccines are of concern. The COVID-19 pandemic has overwhelmed health care systems and new treatments to reduce mortality are urgently needed. We encourage to further evaluate the potential of auranofin in the treatment of COVID-19 in vitro and in animal models of SARS-CoV-2 infection and, if preliminary data are promising, in clinical trials with COVID-19 patients. In our opinion, auranofin has the potential to become a valuable addition to available therapies in this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Auranofin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Approval , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Thioredoxins/metabolism
18.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(11): 1376-1384, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There are no head-to-head trials of different dose escalation strategies of methotrexate (MTX) in RA. We compared the efficacy, safety and tolerability of 'usual' (5 mg every 4 weeks) versus 'fast' (5 mg every 2 weeks) escalation of oral MTX. METHODS: This multicentre, open-label (assessor blinded) RCT included patients 18-55 years of age having active RA with disease duration <5 years, and not on DMARDs. Patients were randomized 1:1 into usual or fast escalation groups, both groups starting MTX at 15 mg/week till a maximum of 25 mg/week. Primary outcome was EULAR good response at 16 weeks, secondary outcomes were ΔDAS28 and adverse effects (AE). Analyses were intention-to-treat. RESULTS: 178 patients with mean DAS28-CRP of 5.4(1.1) were randomized to usual (n=89) or fast escalation groups (n=89). At 16 weeks, there was no difference in good EULAR response in the usual (28.1%) or fast escalation (22.5%) groups (p=0.8). There was no difference in mean ΔDAS28-CRP at 8 weeks (-0.9, -0.8, p=0.72) or 16 weeks (-1.3, -1.3, p=0.98). Even at 24 weeks (extended follow-up), responses were similar. There were no inter-group differences in ΔHAQ, or MTX-polyglutamates 1-3 levels at 8 or 16 weeks. Gastrointestinal AE were higher in the fast escalation group over initial 8 weeks (27%, 40%, p=0.048), but not over 16 weeks. There was no difference in cytopenias, transaminitis, or drug discontinuation/dose reduction between the groups. No serious AE were seen. CONCLUSION: A faster MTX escalation strategy in RA was not more efficacious over 16-24 weeks, and did not significantly increase AE, except higher gastrointestinal AE initially. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CTRI/2018/12/016549.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/administration & dosage , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Methotrexate/administration & dosage , Adolescent , Adult , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/physiopathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/epidemiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Leukopenia/chemically induced , Leukopenia/epidemiology , Male , Methotrexate/analogs & derivatives , Methotrexate/blood , Middle Aged , Polyglutamic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Polyglutamic Acid/blood , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
19.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 6(1): 10-13, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462426

ABSTRACT

We report two cases recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 with rheumatoid arthritis which had been in remission or low disease activity by taking calcineurin inhibitor (CNI). Both cases had moderate to severe pneumonia treated with intravenous dexamethasone or in the severe case remdesivir in addition to it. These cases suggest that the use of CNI may have affected the improvement of severe pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19/drug therapy , Calcineurin Inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Calcineurin , Calcineurin Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Humans , Survivors
20.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 60, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of information on the role of chronic use of hydroxychloroquine during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Our aim was to compare the occurrence of COVID-19 between rheumatic disease patients on hydroxychloroquine with individuals from the same household not taking the drug during the first 8 weeks of community viral transmission in Brazil. METHODS: This baseline cross-sectional analysis is part of a 24-week observational multi-center study involving 22 Brazilian academic outpatient centers. All information regarding COVID-19 symptoms, epidemiological, clinical, and demographic data were recorded on a specific web-based platform using telephone calls from physicians and medical students. COVID-19 was defined according to the Brazilian Ministry of Health (BMH) criteria. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used for statistical analysis and two binary Final Logistic Regression Model by Wald test were developed using a backward-stepwise method for the presence of COVID-19. RESULTS: From March 29th to May 17st, 2020, a total of 10,443 participants were enrolled, including 5166 (53.9%) rheumatic disease patients, of whom 82.5% had systemic erythematosus lupus, 7.8% rheumatoid arthritis, 3.7% Sjögren's syndrome and 0.8% systemic sclerosis. In total, 1822 (19.1%) participants reported flu symptoms within the 30 days prior to enrollment, of which 3.1% fulfilled the BMH criteria, but with no significant difference between rheumatic disease patients (4.03%) and controls (3.25%). After adjustments for multiple confounders, the main risk factor significantly associated with a COVID-19 diagnosis was lung disease (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.58); and for rheumatic disease patients were diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.19-6.63) and glucocorticoids above 10 mg/ day (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.31-3.19). In addition, a recent influenza vaccination had a protective effect (OR 0.674; 95% CI 0.46-0.98). CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatic disease on hydroxychloroquine presented a similar occurrence of COVID-19 to household cohabitants, suggesting a lack of any protective role against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC; RBR - 9KTWX6).


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Sjogren's Syndrome/drug therapy , Statistics, Nonparametric , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL