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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e060000, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736074

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: More than 1 million elective total hip and knee replacements are performed annually in the USA with 2% risk of clinical pulmonary embolism (PE), 0.1%-0.5% fatal PE, and over 1000 deaths. Antithrombotic prophylaxis is standard of care but evidence is limited and conflicting. We will compare effectiveness of three commonly used chemoprophylaxis agents to prevent all-cause mortality (ACM) and clinical venous thromboembolism (VTE) while avoiding bleeding complications. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Pulmonary Embolism Prevention after HiP and KneE Replacement is a large randomised pragmatic comparative effectiveness trial with non-inferiority design and target enrolment of 20 000 patients comparing aspirin (81 mg two times a day), low-intensity warfarin (INR (International Normalized Ratio) target 1.7-2.2) and rivaroxaban (10 mg/day). The primary effectiveness outcome is aggregate of VTE and ACM, primary safety outcome is clinical bleeding complications, and patient-reported outcomes are determined at 1, 3 and 6 months. Primary data analysis is per protocol, as preferred for non-inferiority trials, with secondary analyses adherent to intention-to-treat principles. All non-fatal outcomes are captured from patient and clinical reports with independent blinded adjudication. Study design and oversight are by a multidisciplinary stakeholder team including a 10-patient advisory board. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Institutional Review Board of the Medical University of South Carolina provides central regulatory oversight. Patients aged 21 or older undergoing primary or revision hip or knee replacement are block randomised by site and procedure; those on chronic anticoagulation are excluded. Recruitment commenced at 30 North American centres in December 2016. Enrolment currently exceeds 13 500 patients, representing 33% of those eligible at participating sites, and is projected to conclude in July 2024; COVID-19 may force an extension. Results will inform antithrombotic choice by patients and other stakeholders for various risk cohorts, and will be disseminated through academic publications, meeting presentations and communications to advocacy groups and patient participants. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02810704.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Pulmonary Embolism , Adult , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e050877, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736065

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify patients at risk of mid-late term revision of hip replacement to inform targeted follow-up. DESIGN: Analysis of linked national data sets from primary and secondary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD-GOLD); National Joint Registry (NJR); English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES); Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs)). PARTICIPANTS: Primary elective total hip replacement (THR) aged≥18. EVENT OF INTEREST: Revision surgery≥5 years (mid-late term) after primary THR. STATISTICAL METHODS: Cox regression modelling to ascertain risk factors of mid-late term revision. HR and 95% CI assessed association of sociodemographic factors, comorbidities, medication, surgical variables and PROMs with mid-late term revision. RESULTS: NJR-HES-PROMs data were available from 2008 to 2011 on 142 275 THR; mean age 70.0 years and 61.9% female. CPRD GOLD-HES data covered 1995-2011 on 17 047 THR; mean age 68.4 years, 61.8% female. Patients had minimum 5 years postprimary surgery to end 2016. In NJR-HES-PROMS data, there were 3582 (2.5%) revisions, median time-to-revision after primary surgery 1.9 years (range 0.01-8.7), with 598 (0.4%) mid-late term revisions; in CPRD GOLD, 982 (5.8%) revisions, median time-to-revision 5.3 years (range 0-20), with 520 (3.1%) mid-late term revisions.Reduced risk of mid-late term revision was associated with older age at primary surgery (HR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.95 to 0.96); better 6-month postoperative pain/function scores (HR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.46); use of ceramic-on-ceramic (HR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56 to 0.95) or ceramic-on-polyethylene (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.00) bearing surfaces.Increased risk of mid-late term revision was associated with the use of antidepressants (HR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.59), glucocorticoid injections (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.67) and femoral head size≥44 mm (HR: 2.56; 95% CI: 1.09 to 6.02)No association of gender, obesity or Index of Multiple Deprivation was observed. CONCLUSION: The risk of mid-late term THR is associated with age at primary surgery, 6-month postoperative pain and function and implant factors. Further work is needed to explore the associations with prescription medications observed in our data.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Hip Prosthesis , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Prosthesis Design , Prosthesis Failure , Registries , Reoperation , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc ; 56(1): 14-19, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726530

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of patients admitted for elective orthopaedic surgery during the immediate post-COVID-19 peak of the pandemic. METHODS: This is a multi-center, observational study conducted in 8 high complexity hospitals of Catalonia, one of the highest COVID-19 incidence areas in Spain. We included patients ≥18 years of age undergoing elective surgery (total knee or hip arthroplasty, knee or hip revision arthroplasty, shoulder or knee arthroscopy, hand or wrist surgery, forefoot surgery, or hardware removal) after the COVID-19 peak (between May 5th and June 30th, 2020). The main exclusion criterion was a positive result for SARS-CoV-2 PCR within the 7 days before the surgery. The primary outcomes were postoperative complications within 60 days (+/-30) or hospital readmission due to a COVID-19 infection. Following the recommendations of the International Consensus Group (ICM), elective surgeries were re-started when the nationwide lockdown was lifted. Before the surgery, patients were contacted by phone to rule out any exposure to confirmed COVID-19 cases, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed in all patients 48-72 hours before hospital admission, and they were asked to maintain home confinement until the day of the surgery. RESULTS: 675 patients were included: 189 patients in the arthroplasty group (28%) and 486 in the ambulatory surgery group (72%). Mean [SD] age was 57.6 [15.3] years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index score was 2.21 (SD = 2.01, Min = 0, Max = 13). A total of 84 patients (12.75%) obtained an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥ 3, showing no association between the ASA score and the risk of developing COVID-19 symptoms at follow-up (χ 2 (4) = 0.77, P = 0.94). The mean occupation rate of hospital beds for COVID-19 patients was 13% and the mean occupation rate of critical care beds for COVID-19 patients was 27% at the time of re-introducing elective surgeries. These were important rates to consider to decide when to reintroduce elective surgeries after lockdown. Surgical time, time of ischemia and intra-operative bleeding were not related with a higher risk of developing COVID-19 post-operatively (χ 2 (1) = 0.00, P = 0.98); (χ 2 (2) = 2.05, P = 0.36); (χ 2 (2) = 0.37, P = 0.83). Only 2 patients (0.3 %) presented with a suspected COVID-19 infection at follow-up. None of them presented with pneumonia or required confirmation by a reverse transcription PCR assay. Hospital re-admission was not needed for these patients. CONCLUSION: The risk of developing COVID-19 during the immediate post-COVID-19 peak in a region with a high incidence of COVID-19 has not been proved. These data suggest that elective orthopaedic surgeries can be resumed when assertive and strict protocols are followed.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Humans , Incidence , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(7S): S457-S464, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of a postoperative diagnosis of COVID-19 in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA) remains unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of COVID-19 infection following TJA on perioperative complication rates. METHODS: The Mariner database was queried for patients undergoing total hip and total knee arthroplasty from January 2018 to April 2020. TJA patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 within 90 days postoperatively were matched in a 1:3 fashion based on age, gender, iron deficiency anemia, payer status, and Charlson Comorbidity Index with patients who were not diagnosed with COVID-19. Preoperative comorbidity profiles and complications within 3 months of surgery were compared. Statistical analysis included chi-squared tests and multivariate logistic regression with outcomes considered significant at P < .05. RESULTS: Of the 239 COVID-19 positive patients, 132 (55.2%) underwent total hip arthroplasty. On multivariate analysis, COVID-19 diagnosis was associated with increased odds of deep vein thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10-11.81, P < .001), pulmonary embolism (OR 6.27, 95% CI 2.57-16.71, P < .001), and all complications (OR 3.36, 95% CI 2.47-4.59, P < .001). Incidence of deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolism was greater the closer in time the COVID-19 diagnosis was to the surgical procedure (10.24 times at 1 month, 7.87 times at 2 months, and 1.42 times at 3 months; P < .001). A similar relationship was observed with all complications. CONCLUSION: Postoperative COVID-19 infection is associated with higher rates of cardiopulmonary complications, thromboembolic disease, renal injury, and urinary tract infections in patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty. COVID-19 infection earlier in the postoperative period is associated with a higher risk of complications.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thrombosis , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
5.
Hosp Pract (1995) ; 50(1): 68-74, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625868

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The first known COVID-19 patient in the United States was reported on 1/20/2020. Since then, we noted increased thromboembolic events among our THA/TKA patients. Therefore, we sought to determine: (1) monthly incidences of pulmonary embolism (PE)/deep vein thrombosis (DVT) before and after January/2020 and (2) thromboembolic event rates for primary and revision patients. METHODS: We retrospectively obtained from our electronic-medical-records the total monthly number of patients (December/2018-March/2021) who underwent primary or revision THA/TKA, and among them, those who had PE/DVT during each month. Monthly rates of thromboembolic events were calculated and figures were created showing rates throughout time. The cutoff month to define before and after COVID-19 was January/2020. RESULTS: During the study period, 1.6% of patients (312/19068) had PE/DVT [PE (n = 102), DVT (n = 242), both (n = 32)]. Overall rate of PE/DVT before January/2020 was 1.2% (119/9545) and it was 2.0% (193/9523) after that month. Incidences of PE/DVT on April/June/July of 2020 were 3.4%, 3%, 3.4%, respectively. A major increase, when compared to 2019 (1.3%, 1%, 1%, respectively). An unusually high rate of PE was observed on April/2020 (3.4%), more than three times the one observed in any other month. After January/2020, there was an overall major increase of PE/DVT rates, but particularly among revision patients: 6% in five different months including 11.5% on November/2020. CONCLUSION: There was a major increase of thromboembolic events among THA/TKA patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, predominantly in revision patients. Patients need counseling about this increased risk. It remains uncertain whether more aggressive thromboprophylactic regimes should be followed.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
6.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 29(24): e1321-e1327, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556078

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in the unprecedented widespread cancellation of scheduled elective primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in the United States. The impact of postponing scheduled total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty procedures on patients has not been well studied and may have physical, emotional, and financial consequences. METHODS: All patients whose elective primary TJA procedures at a tertiary academic medical center were postponed because of COVID-19 were surveyed. Seventy-four patients agreed to answer 13 questions concerning the physical, mental, and financial impact of surgery cancellation. Statistical analysis, including Pearson correlation coefficients, cross-tabulation analysis, and chi squares, was performed. RESULTS: 13.5% of patients strongly disagreed with the use of "elective" to describe their cancelled TJA surgery and 25.7% of patients reported substantial physical and/or mental deterioration due to postponement. Younger individuals experienced greater change in their symptoms (P = 0.034), anxiety about their pain (P = 0.010), and frustration/anger (P = 0.043). Poor quality of life, mood, and lower HOOS/KOOS Jr interval scores were correlated with greater financial strain, disagreement with the postponement, and disagreement with the use of "elective" to describe surgery. Disagreement with the use of "elective" to describe surgery was associated with greater financial strain (P = 0.013) and disagreement with the decision to postpone surgery (P = 0.008). In addition, greater financial strain was associated with disagreement with postponement (P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: The cancellation of elective TJA during the COVID-19 pandemic had a variety of consequences for patients. One in four patients reported experiencing substantial physical and/or emotional deterioration. Associations of poor quality of life and mood with greater financial strain and disagreement with the term "elective" were seen. These results help quantify the deleterious effects of cancelling elective surgery and identify at-risk patients should another postponement of surgery occur. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II-Prospective cohort study.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
7.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(3): 147-164, 2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429175

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify the proportion of patients with continued opioid use after total hip or knee arthroplasty. METHODS: This systematic review and meta-analysis searched Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts for articles published from January 1, 2009, to May 26, 2021. The search terms (opioid, postoperative, hospital discharge, total hip or knee arthroplasty, and treatment duration) were based on 5 key concepts. We included studies of adults who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty, with at least 3 months postoperative follow-up. RESULTS: There were 30 studies included. Of these, 17 reported on outcomes of total hip arthroplasty and 19 reported on outcomes of total knee arthroplasty, with some reporting on outcomes of both procedures. In patients having total hip arthroplasty, rates of postoperative opioid use at various time points were as follows: at 3 months, 20% (95% CI, 13%-26%); at 6 months, 17% (95% CI, 12%-21%); at 9 months, 19% (95% CI, 13%-24%); and at 12 months, 16% (95% CI, 15%-16%). In patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty, rates of postoperative opioid use were as follows: at 3 months, 26% (95% CI, 19%-33%); at 6 months, 20% (95% CI, 17%-24%); at 9 months, 23% (95% CI, 17%-28%); and at 12 months, 21% (95% CI, 12%-29%). Opioid naïve patients were less likely to have continued postoperative opioid use than those who were opioid tolerant preoperatively. CONCLUSION: Over 1 in 5 patients continued opioid use for longer than 3 months after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Clinicians should be aware of this trajectory of opioid consumption after surgery.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Opioid-Related Disorders , Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Humans , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Pain, Postoperative/drug therapy , Pain, Postoperative/epidemiology
8.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(12): e58, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From February 20 to April 2020, the coronavirus SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV-2 spread in northern Italy, drastically challenging the care capacities of the national health care system. Unprepared for this emergency, hospitals have quickly reformulated paths of assistance in an effort to guarantee treatment for infected patients. Orthopaedic departments have been focused on elderly traumatology, especially the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the orthopaedic management strategy for femoral fragility fractures in COVID-19-positive patients with the hypothesis that operative treatment may contribute to the overall stability of the patient. METHODS: Sixteen patients affected by proximal femoral fracture and a recent history of fever, shortness of breath, and desaturation were admitted to the emergency room. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) and oropharyngeal swabs confirmed that they were positive for COVID-19, requiring hospitalization and prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin. RESULTS: Three patients died before surgery because of severe respiratory insufficiency and multiple-organ-failure syndrome. Ten patients underwent surgery on the day after admission, whereas 3 patients had suspended their use of direct thrombin inhibitors and needed surgery to be delayed until the third day after admission. In all patients except 1, we noted an improvement in terms of O2 saturation and assisted respiration. In 9 patients, hemodynamic and respiratory stability was observed at an average of 7 days postoperatively. Four patients who underwent surgical treatment died of respiratory failure on the first day after surgery (1 patient), the third day after surgery (2 patients), or the seventh day after surgery (1 patient). CONCLUSIONS: We noted a stabilization of respiratory parameters in 12 COVID-19-positive patients who underwent surgery treatment of proximal femoral fractures. We believe that in elderly patients with COVID-19 who have proximal femoral fractures, surgery may contribute to the overall stability of the patient, seated mobilization, improvement in physiological ventilation, and general patient comfort in bed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Femoral Fractures/surgery , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary/adverse effects , Frailty/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Femoral Fractures/mortality , Femoral Fractures/virology , Frailty/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(33): e26760, 2021 Aug 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367077

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The present study reported early clinical outcomes and perioperative precautions for medical staffs during joint arthroplasty procedures in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients.The medical records of 8 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection who underwent joint arthroplasty from January 19 to September 24, 2020 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Perioperative precautions and follow-up (time length varies from 6 month to 13 months, 11 months in average) for SARS-CoV-2 infection of medical staffs were reported.All patients recovered well from both the primary disease and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Significant improved Visual analogue scale was observed with no major complications or recurrence of the COVID-19 at discharge. There was no evidence indicating SARS-CoV-2 infection in any health providers.Elective joint arthroplasties for patients in recovery period of SARS-CoV-2 infection could be continued under comprehensive preoperative evaluation and appropriate medical protection. For patients with currently confirmed or highly suspected COVID-19, the operation should be carried out only if it was essential.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Medical Staff, Hospital , Perioperative Care/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Clinical Protocols , Female , Hip/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Postoperative Care , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Workflow
11.
JBJS Case Connect ; 11(2)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261314

ABSTRACT

CASE: A 57-year-old woman with a history of COVID-19 pneumonia, myelodysplastic syndrome, type II diabetes mellitus, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis underwent elective total hip arthroplasty 3 months after her COVID-19 infection had clinically resolved. Her postoperative course was complicated by COVID-19-negative pneumonia within 24 hours postoperatively requiring ICU admission. CONCLUSION: Patients who have previously recovered from COVID-19 infection may have long-lasting cardiopulmonary effects that may be asymptomatic. Further assessment of postoperative risk and guidance on preoperative evaluation of COVID-19 "survivors" is needed.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Pneumonia/etiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged
13.
J Arthroplasty ; 36(7S): S40-S44.e3, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077777

ABSTRACT

At the hybrid 2020 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, an audience response poll was conducted to determine current practice patterns among its members. The poll was completed via a mobile application (ie, app) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and allowed both in-person and virtual attendees to provide responses to multiple choice questions related to practice patterns pertaining to primary total hip arthroplasties and primary total knee arthroplasties. Moreover, results were compared to findings from previous polls.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Surgeons , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
14.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 29(10): 3159-3163, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023319

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the COVID-19 pandemic there has been a massive reduction of arthroplasty services due to reallocation of hospital resources. The unique challenge for clinicians has been to define which arthroplasty patients most urgently require surgery. The present study aimed to investigate priority arthroplasty procedures during the pandemic and in the reinstatement period from the surgeon's perspective. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An online survey was conducted among members of the European Hip Society (EHS), European Knee Associates (EKA) and other invited orthopaedic arthroplasty surgeons (experts) from across the world. The survey consisted of 17 different arthroplasty procedures/indications of which participants were asked to choose and rank the most important 10. RESULTS: Four hundred and thirty-nine arthroplasty surgeons from 44 countries responded. The EHS and EKA had a 43% response rate of members. In weighted average points, the majority of respondents (67.5 points) ranked 'acute fractures requiring arthroplasty (Periprosthetic fractures, THA/hemi-arthroplasty for femoral neck fractures)' as priority indication number one, followed by 'first-stage explantations for acute PJI (periprosthetic joint infection)' in second place and priority indication (45.9 points) three as 'one-stage revision for acute PJI' (39.7 points). CONCLUSIONS: There was agreement that femoral neck fractures, periprosthetic fractures, and acute infections should be prioritised and cannot be postponed in the setting of the COVID-19 pandemic. As arthroplasty procedures are being resumed in most countries now, there has also been a relaxation of lockdown rules in most countries, which might cause a so-called second wave of the pandemic. Therefore, the results of the current study present a proposal by experts as to which operations should be prioritised in the setting of a second wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Reoperation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(12): 1774-1781, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949095

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The primary aim of this study was to assess the independent association of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on postoperative mortality for patients undergoing orthopaedic and trauma surgery. The secondary aim was to identify factors that were associated with developing COVID-19 during the postoperative period. METHODS: A multicentre retrospective study was conducted of all patients presenting to nine centres over a 50-day period during the COVID-19 pandemic (1 March 2020 to 19 April 2020) with a minimum of 50 days follow-up. Patient demographics, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, priority (urgent or elective), procedure type, COVID-19 status, and postoperative mortality were recorded. RESULTS: During the study period, 1,659 procedures were performed in 1,569 patients. There were 68 (4.3%) patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19. There were 85 (5.4%) deaths postoperatively. Patients who had COVID-19 had a significantly lower survival rate when compared with those without a proven SARS-CoV-2 infection (67.6% vs 95.8%, p < 0.001). When adjusting for confounding variables (older age (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.004), hip fracture (p = 0.003), and increasing ASA grade (p < 0.001)) a diagnosis of COVID-19 was associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 to 3.12; p = 0.014). A total of 62 patients developed COVID-19 postoperatively, of which two were in the elective and 60 were in the urgent group. Patients aged > 77 years (odds ratio (OR) 3.16; p = 0.001), with increasing ASA grade (OR 2.74; p < 0.001), sustaining a hip (OR 4.56; p = 0.008) or periprosthetic fracture (OR 14.70; p < 0.001) were more likely to develop COVID-19 postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Perioperative COVID-19 nearly doubled the background postoperative mortality risk following surgery. Patients at risk of developing COVID-19 postoperatively (patients > 77 years, increasing morbidity, sustaining a hip or periprosthetic fracture) may benefit from perioperative shielding. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(12):1774-1781.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Hip Fractures/surgery , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hip Fractures/complications , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate/trends , United Kingdom/epidemiology
16.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 26: 1076029620961450, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901722

ABSTRACT

Two of the more common potential complications after arthroplasty are venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE), and excess bleeding. Appropriate chemoprophylaxis choices are essential to prevent some of these adverse events and from exacerbating others. Risk stratification to prescribe safe and effective medications in the prevention of postoperative VTE has shown benefit in this regard. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Syosset Hospital/Northwell Health, which performs over 1200 arthroplasties annually, has validated and is using the 2013 version of the Caprini Risk Assessment Model (RAM) to stratify each patient for risk of postoperative VTE. This tool results in a culling of information, past and present, personal and familial, that provides a truly thorough evaluation of the patient's risk for postoperative VTE. The Caprini score then guides the medication choices for thromboprophylaxis. The Caprini score is only valuable if the data is properly collected, and we have learned numerous lessons after applying it for 18 months. Risk stratification requires practice and experience to achieve expertise in perioperative patient evaluation. Having access to pertinent patient information, while gaining proficiency in completing the Caprini RAM, is vital to its efficacy. Ongoing, real time analyses of patient outcomes, with subsequent change in process, is key to improving patient care.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Risk Assessment/methods , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement/methods , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/methods , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/methods , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Hemorrhage/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Premedication , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
17.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(9): 1136-1145, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-829492

ABSTRACT

AIMS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many patients continue to require urgent surgery for hip fractures. However, the impact of COVID-19 on perioperative outcomes in these high-risk patients remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to establish the effects of COVID-19 on perioperative morbidity and mortality, and determine any risk factors for increased mortality in patients with COVID-19 undergoing hip fracture surgery. METHODS: This multicentre cohort study included 340 COVID-19-negative patients versus 82 COVID-19-positive patients undergoing surgical treatment for hip fractures across nine NHS hospitals in Greater London, UK. Patients in both treatment groups were comparable for age, sex, body mass index, fracture configuration, and type of surgery performed. Predefined perioperative outcomes were recorded within a 30-day postoperative period. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to identify risk factors associated with increased risk of mortality. RESULTS: COVID-19-positive patients had increased postoperative mortality rates (30.5% (25/82) vs 10.3% (35/340) respectively, p < 0.001) compared to COVID-19-negative patients. Risk factors for increased mortality in patients with COVID-19 undergoing surgery included positive smoking status (hazard ratio (HR) 15.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55 to 52.2; p < 0.001) and greater than three comorbidities (HR 13.5 (95% CI 2.82 to 66.0, p < 0.001). COVID-19-positive patients had increased risk of postoperative complications (89.0% (73/82) vs 35.0% (119/340) respectively; p < 0.001), more critical care unit admissions (61.0% (50/82) vs 18.2% (62/340) respectively; p < 0.001), and increased length of hospital stay (mean 13.8 days (SD 4.6) vs 6.7 days (SD 2.5) respectively; p < 0.001), compared to COVID-19-negative patients. CONCLUSION: Hip fracture surgery in COVID-19-positive patients was associated with increased length of hospital stay, more admissions to the critical care unit, higher risk of perioperative complications, and increased mortality rates compared to COVID-19-negative patients. Risk factors for increased mortality in patients with COVID-19 undergoing surgery included positive smoking status and multiple (greater than three) comorbidities. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(9):1136-1145.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/surgery , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/methods , COVID-19 , Cause of Death , Cohort Studies , Female , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/methods , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Reference Values , Risk Assessment , United Kingdom
18.
J Arthroplasty ; 36(1): 30-36, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688738

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Advances in perioperative care have enabled early discharge and outpatient primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA). However, the safety of early discharge after revision TJA (rTJA) remains unknown and the COVID-19 pandemic will force decreased hospitalization. This study compared 90-day outcomes in patients undergoing aseptic rTJA discharged the same or next day (early) to those discharged 2 or 3 days postoperatively (later). METHODS: In total, 530 aseptic rTJAs performed at a single tertiary care referral center (December 5, 2011 to December 30, 2019) were identified. Early and later discharge patients were matched as closely as possible on procedure type, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification, age, and body mass index. All patients were optimized using modern perioperative protocols. The rate of 90-day emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions was compared between groups. RESULTS: In total, 183 early discharge rTJAs (54 hips, 129 knees) in 178 patients were matched to 183 later discharge rTJAs (71 hips, 112 knees) in 165 patients. Sixty-two percent of the sample was female, with an overall average age and body mass index of 63 ± 9.9 (range: 18-92) years and 32 ± 6.9 (range: 18-58) kg/m2. There was no statistical difference in 90-day ED visit rates between early (6/178, 3.4%) and later (11/165, 6.7%) discharge patients (P = .214). Ninety-day hospital admission rates for early (7/178, 3.9%) and later (4/165, 2.4%) discharges did not differ (P = .545). CONCLUSION: Using modern perioperative protocols with appropriate patient selection, early discharge following aseptic rTJA does not increase 90-day readmissions or ED visits. As hospital inpatient capacity remains limited due to COVID-19, select rTJA patients may safely discharge home the same or next day to preserve hospital beds and resources for more critical illness.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Patient Readmission , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
19.
J Knee Surg ; 35(4): 424-433, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729017

ABSTRACT

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) represents a paradigm shift in perioperative care, aimed at achieving early recovery for surgical patients, reducing length of hospital stay, and complications. The purpose of this study was to provide an insight of the impact of the COVID-19 on ERAS protocols for knee arthroplasty patients in a tertiary hospital and potential strategy changes for postpandemic practice. We retrospectively reviewed all cases that underwent surgery utilizing ERAS protocols in the quarter prior to the pandemic (fourth quarter of 2019) and during the first quarter of 2020 when the pandemic started. A review of the literature on ERAS protocols for knee arthroplasty during the COVID-19 pandemic was also performed and discussed. A total of 199 knee arthroplasties were performed in fourth quarter of 2019 as compared with 76 in the first quarter of 2020 during the COVID-19 outbreak. Patients who underwent surgery in the first quarter of 2020 had shorter inpatient stays (3.8 vs. 4.5 days), larger percentage of discharges by postoperative day 5 (86.8 vs. 74.9%), and a larger proportion of patients discharged to their own homes (68 vs. 54%). The overall complication rate (1.3 vs. 3%) and readmission within 30 days (2.6 vs. 2%) was similar between both groups. ERAS protocols appear to reduce hospital lengths of stay for patients undergoing knee arthroplasty without increasing the risk of short-term complications and readmissions. The beneficial effects of ERAS appear to be amplified by and are synchronous with the requirements of operating in the era of a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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