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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(10)2022 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875645

ABSTRACT

Actinidia latifolia is one of the very few kiwifruit genotypes with extremely high ascorbic acid (AsA) content. However, a transcriptome atlas of this species is lacking. The accumulation of AsA during fruit development and ripening and the associated molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Herein, dynamic changes in AsA content at six different stages of A. latifolia fruit development and ripening were determined. AsA content of A. latifolia fruit reached 1108.76 ± 35.26 mg 100 g-1 FW at full maturity. A high-quality, full-length (FL) transcriptome of A. latifolia was successfully constructed for the first time using third-generation sequencing technology. The transcriptome comprises 326,926 FL non-chimeric reads, 15,505 coding sequences, 2882 transcription factors, 18,797 simple sequence repeats, 3328 long noncoding RNAs, and 231 alternative splicing events. The genes involved in AsA biosynthesis and recycling pathways were identified and compared with those in different kiwifruit genotypes. The correlation between the AsA content and expression levels of key genes in AsA biosynthesis and recycling pathways was revealed. LncRNAs that participate in AsA-related gene expression regulation were also identified. Gene expression patterns in AsA biosynthesis and metabolism exhibited a trend similar to that of AsA accumulation. Overall, this study paves the way for genetic engineering to develop kiwifruits with super-high AsA content.


Subject(s)
Actinidia , Actinidia/genetics , Actinidia/metabolism , Ascorbic Acid/metabolism , Fruit/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Plant , Transcriptome
2.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266705, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799052

ABSTRACT

The uncontrolled spread of (mis)information, news and propaganda related to COVID 19 created an 'infodemic' leading to panic and unscientific practices among the mass. With the largest number of internet users in the world, India has witnessed a steep rise in the number of people seeking information on social media related to COVID-19, which reached a staggering 22.3 million by March, 2020. This study aimed to evaluate the trend of COVID-19 associated food and nutrition news search by Indian internet users between 27th January 2020 to 30th June 2021 (time period between the first detected COVID-19 case and the end of the second wave in India) and its impact on their perceptions and practices. The association between the change in Relative Search Volume (RSV) on Google Trends (GT) of 34 popularly searched keywords classified by the researchers under 5 different categories-"Immunity", "Eating behavior", "Food safety", "Food scares and concerns" and "Covid scare" showed a steep rise in search for immunity boosters, vitamin supplement brands "ayush kadha (ayurvedic decoction) during the first wave (April- August 2020). With a brief period of decline in the search trend, it again hiked correspondingly with the growing number of positive cases during the second wave in India. An online survey conducted on adult Indian internet users (n = 572) reported high (71.9%) consumption of Vitamin C rich fruits as well as Vitamin C (68.2%) and Zinc (61.4%) supplements to boost immunity. Traditional Indian spices like ginger and garlic were used by 62.9% and 50.9% respondents respectively. Most respondents reported to rely on social media for gathering COVID-19 associated tips for boosting immunity, however those with history of COVID-19 infection reported to rely more on doctors and health professionals for information. This study highlights the need of media and health literacy to advocate for the use of health information cautiously.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Adult , Ascorbic Acid , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(7)2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785729

ABSTRACT

The development of affordable, effective, and environmentally friendly barrier fabrics is a current goal in antimicrobial textile development. The discovery of new routes to achieve non-toxic naturally occurring molecules with antimicrobial activity is of interest in the development of materials that promote wound healing, improve hygiene, and offer protection against nosocomial infection. Highly cleaned and sterile unbleached cotton has constituents that produce hydrogen peroxide at levels commensurate with those that favor cell signaling in wound healing. Here, we show the antimicrobial and antiviral properties of spunlaced griege cotton-containing nonwovens treated with ascorbic acid formulations. The mechanism of action occurs through the promotion of enhanced hydrogen peroxide activity. The levels of hydrogen peroxide activity afford antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and antiviral activity against MS2 bacteriophages. Spun-bond nonwoven unbleached cotton was treated with ascorbic acid using traditional pad-dry-cure methods. An assessment of antibacterial and antiviral activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and MS2 bacteriophages with the AATCC 100 test method showed a 99.99% inhibitory activity. An approach to the covalent attachment of ascorbic to cellulose through citric acid crosslinking chemistry is also discussed. Thus, a simple, low-cost approach to antimicrobial and antiviral cotton-based nonwovens applicable to dressings, nosocomial barrier fabrics, and face masks can be adopted by combining ascorbic acid with spunlace greige cotton nonwoven fabrics.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , Cotton Fiber , Adjuvants, Pharmaceutic , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Gossypium , Hydrogen Peroxide , Textiles
4.
Complement Ther Med ; 67: 102827, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768027

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: With the expansion of the internet, social media platforms have become a major source of medical information. However, medical information on online multimedia platforms is often inaccurate. In the current study, we evaluated the reliability, quality, and accuracy of the most viewed YouTube videos featuring the effects of vitamin C on COVID-19. METHODS: A search was conducted on YouTube on January 13, 2022, using the keywords ("ascorbic acid" OR "vitamin C" OR "sodium ascorbate" OR "L-ascorbic") AND ("coronavirus" OR "COVID 19" OR "COVID-19" OR "Corona" OR "COVID" OR "SARSCoV2"). We assessed the 50 most-viewed videos using a modified DISCERN scale (mDISCERN) and Global Quality Scale (GQS). Additionally, the accuracy of the information in each video was evaluated. RESULTS: Out of the 50 most-viewed videos featuring the effect of vitamin C on COVID-19, 54% were not reliable. Furthermore, 62% presented poor quality, and 74% were misleading or neither accurate nor misleading. The average mDISCERN and GQS scores of the 50 included videos were 2.2 ± 1.4 (≥ 3: highly reliable) and 2.2 ± 1.1 (2: generally poor), respectively. Although the videos were made by medical doctors, their reliability, quality, and accuracy were not significantly different from those displayed in other sources, including fitness channels, television or internet-based news or programs, consumers, company channels, product advertisements, or prepared by nurses. CONCLUSIONS: The reliability, quality, and accuracy of the 50 most-viewed videos on the effect of vitamin C on COVID-19 were not high. Video creators, especially medical doctors, should make an effort so that the videos present reliable content with high-quality and correct information is disseminated to people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Information Dissemination , Reproducibility of Results , Video Recording
5.
Molecules ; 27(6)2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765796

ABSTRACT

The rosehip (Rosa canina L.) fruit has gained researchers' attention due to its rich chemical composition in vitamin C, phenols, carotenoids, and high antioxidant activity; meanwhile, polymers such as pea protein are generally recognized as exhibiting a protection role against the extrusion process. Corn snacks extrudates obtained by replacing corn flour with 10% R. canina powder (R) and 10% R. canina with pea protein (RPP) were evaluated for the physicochemical, textural, optical, and nutritional characteristics. A sample manufactured without R. canina powder was used as a control. Hardness, crispiness, chewiness, and solubility index (WSI) of the final extrudates were improved by addition of R. canina and pea protein powder (PP); meanwhile, b* (yellow/blue coordinate), C (chroma), and h* (tone) optical parameters were significantly different from the control sample (p < 0.05). Extrusion highlighted a negative impact on total phenols, carotenoids, vitamin C, and antioxidant activity extrudates, while PP exhibited a good protection against the extrusion process. In vitro digestion increased the bioaccessibility of vitamin C, folate, antioxidant activity, total phenols, and total carotenoids mainly on RPP extrudates.


Subject(s)
Rosa , Antioxidants , Ascorbic Acid , Phenols/chemistry , Rosa/chemistry , Zea mays/chemistry
6.
Nutrients ; 14(6)2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763060

ABSTRACT

Although undisputed for its anti-inflammatory and immune system boosting properties, vitamin C remains an inconsistently investigated nutrient in the United States. However, subclinical inadequacies may partly explain increased inflammation and decreased immune function within the population. This secondary analysis cross-sectional study used the 2003-2006 NHANES surveys to identify more clearly the association between plasma vitamin C and clinical biomarkers of acute and chronic inflammation C-reactive protein (CRP) and red cell distribution width (RDW). From plasma vitamin C levels separated into five defined categories (deficiency, hypovitaminosis, inadequate, adequate, and saturating), ANOVA tests identified significant differences in means in all insufficient vitamin C categories (deficiency, hypovitaminosis, and inadequate) and both CRP and RDW in 7607 study participants. There were also statistically significant differences in means between sufficient plasma vitamin C levels (adequate and saturating categories) and CRP. Significant differences were not identified between adequate and saturating plasma vitamin C levels and RDW. Although inadequate levels of vitamin C may not exhibit overt signs or symptoms of deficiency, differences in mean levels identified between inflammatory biomarkers suggest a closer examination of those considered at risk for inflammatory-driven diseases. Likewise, the subclinical levels of inflammation presented in this study provide evidence to support ranges for further clinical inflammation surveillance.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein , Erythrocyte Indices , Ascorbic Acid , Biomarkers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nutrition Surveys , United States
7.
Libyan J Med ; 17(1): 2054111, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752028

ABSTRACT

Vitamins (Vit) C and D are widely used as immunogenic supplements among severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected patients. The SAR-CoV-2 virus enters into the pulmonary endothelial cells through attachment to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor (Ace2) and the proteolytic activity of Cathepsin L (Ctsl) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (Tmprss2) enzymes. This study aimed to determine the influence of Vit C and D on the mRNA expression of Ace2, Tmprss2, and Ctsl genes in the mouse lungs. Vitamins C and D were administrated to different groups of mice through intra-peritoneal route in doses equivalent to human for 30 days. Then, the mRNA expression of SARS-CoV-2 entry gene was analyzed using qRT-PCR. It is found that Vit D, but not C, upregulated significantly (P < 0.05) the mRNA expression of Ace2 by more than six folds, while downregulated the expression of Ctsl and Tmprss2 genes by 2.8 and 2.2 folds, respectively. It can be concluded from this study that Vit D alters the mRNA expression of Ace2, Tmprss, and Ctsl genes in the mouse lungs. This finding can help us in understanding, at least in part, the molecular influence of Vit D on genes involved in the entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Serine Proteases , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Ascorbic Acid/metabolism , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Cathepsin L/genetics , Cathepsin L/metabolism , Endothelial Cells , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Mice , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Proteases/metabolism , Vitamins
8.
Nutrients ; 14(5)2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725910

ABSTRACT

Vitamin C has a number of acitvities that could contribute to its immune-modulating effects. The only question is whether we should provide ourselves with only the right level of it, or do we need much more during a pandemic? The possibility of reducing the incidence of viral diseases in a well-nourished population through the use of dietary supplements based on vitamin C is not supported in the literature. Despite this, the belief that an extra intake of vitamin C can increase the efficacy of the immune system is still popular and vitamin C is advertised as a remedy to prevent infectious disease. This article refers to the justification of the use of vitamin C in high doses as an anti-SARS-CoV-2 prophylaxis in healthy subjects. Does it make sense or not? As it turns out, any effects of vitamin C supplementation may be more prominent when the baseline vitamin C level is low, for example in physically active persons. People with hypovitaminosis C are more likely to respond to vitamin C administration. No studies regarding prevention of COVID-19 with high-dose vitamin C supplementation in healthy subjects were found.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Ascorbic Acid , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements , Healthy Volunteers , Humans
9.
Nutrients ; 12(6)2020 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725884

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (Sars-CoV-2) global pandemic is a devastating event that is causing thousands of victims every day around the world. One of the main reasons of the great impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on society is its unexpected spread, which has not allowed an adequate preparation. The scientific community is fighting against time for the production of a vaccine, but it is difficult to place a safe and effective product on the market as fast as the virus is spreading. Similarly, for drugs that can directly interfere with viral pathways, their production times are long, despite the great efforts made. For these reasons, we analyzed the possible role of non-pharmacological substances such as supplements, probiotics, and nutraceuticals in reducing the risk of Sars-CoV-2 infection or mitigating the symptoms of COVID-19. These substances could have numerous advantages in the current circumstances, are generally easily available, and have negligible side effects if administered at the already used and tested dosages. Large scientific evidence supports the benefits that some bacterial and molecular products may exert on the immune response to respiratory viruses. These could also have a regulatory role in systemic inflammation or endothelial damage, which are two crucial aspects of COVID-19. However, there are no specific data available, and rigorous clinical trials should be conducted to confirm the putative benefits of diet supplementation, probiotics, and nutraceuticals in the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diet therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diet , Dietary Supplements , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diet therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Probiotics/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
11.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 26, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701731

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intravenous vitamin C administration in septic shock may have a sparing effect on vasopressor requirements, and vitamin C's enzyme cofactor functions provide a mechanistic rationale. Our study aimed to determine the effect of intravenous vitamin C administration on vasopressor requirements and other outcomes in patients with septic shock. METHODS: This was a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial in 40 patients with septic shock who were randomised (1:1) to receive intravenous vitamin C (at a dose of 25 mg/kg of body weight every 6 h) or placebo (intravenous 5% dextrose) for up to 96 h, or until death or discharge. The primary outcome was intravenous vasopressor requirements (dose and duration), and secondary outcomes included Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay, and mortality. In addition, blood samples were collected to determine vitamin C kinetics and inflammatory marker concentrations. RESULTS: Median plasma vitamin C concentrations were deficient at baseline (9.2 [4.4, 12] µmol/L) and increased to 408 (227, 560) µmol/L following 72 h of intervention. The mean duration of intravenous vasopressor infusion in the vitamin C group was 48 (95% CI 35-62) hours and in the placebo group was 54 (95% CI 41-62) hours (p = 0.52). The dose of vasopressor delivered over time was comparable between the two groups, as were SOFA scores (p > 0.05). The median ICU length of stay in the intervention group was 3.8 (2.2, 9.8) days versus 7.1 (3.1, 20) days in the placebo group (p = 0.12). The median hospital length of stay for the vitamin C group was 18 (11, 35) days versus 22 (10, 52) days for the placebo group (p = 0.65). Mortality was comparable between the two groups (p > 0.05). Of the inflammatory markers, neutrophil counts were elevated in the vitamin C group relative to placebo by 72 h (p = 0.01). C-reactive protein and myeloperoxidase concentrations were elevated at baseline, however, the two groups were comparable over time (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our pilot study indicated that intravenous vitamin C did not provide significant decreases in the mean dose or duration of vasopressor infusion. Further research that takes into account the potential impact of intervention timing, dose and duration, and location of trial, may provide more definitive evidence. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12617001184369 (11/8/2017).


Subject(s)
Shock, Septic , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pilot Projects , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Vitamins
12.
Nutr Clin Pract ; 37(2): 274-281, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680518

ABSTRACT

The administration of intravenous vitamin C (IV-VC) in treating patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is still highly controversial. There have been no previous studies on the effect of IV-VC on the severity and mortality of COVID-19. Hence, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the disease severity and mortality in patients with COVID-19 who promptly received IV-VC treatment vs those who did not. We performed a comprehensive systematic search of seven health science databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Data, up to June 23, 2021. We identified a total of seven related articles, which were included in this study. This meta-analysis showed that IV-VC treatment did not affect disease severity compared with placebo treatment or usual care (odds ratio [OR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.07; P = 0.10). In addition, no statistically significant difference in mortality was observed between patients who received IV-VC treatment and those who did not (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.41 to 1.00; P = 0.05). Moreover, the adjusted meta-analysis revealed that the use of IV-VC did not influence disease severity (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.34 to 1.31; P = 0.242) or mortality (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.40; P = 0.877) in comparison with a control group. The results of this meta-analysis demonstrated that short-term IV-VC treatment did not reduce the risk of severity and mortality in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , China , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Nutrients ; 14(3)2022 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674744

ABSTRACT

Vitamins C and D have well-known immune supportive roles, with deficiencies in both vitamins predisposing to increased risk and severity of respiratory infections. Numerous studies have indicated that administration of these vitamins, particularly to people who are deficient, can decrease the risk and severity of respiratory infections. This has stimulated an interest in the potential efficacy of these vitamins in people with novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection and its more severe disease (COVID-19). In this overview, we highlight the current research evidence around the multiple levels of immune support provided by vitamins C and D in the context of general respiratory infections and with a focus on the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. These include: prevention of infection; attenuating infection symptoms and severity; adjunctive therapy for severe disease; attenuating ongoing sequelae (long COVID); and immunisation support. Although some of these topics have not yet been investigated in great depth concerning SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, extensive research into the role of these vitamins in general respiratory infections has highlighted directions for future research in the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vitamins/therapeutic use
14.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 80(1): 65-68, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674125

ABSTRACT

Management of triglyceride (TG) levels is essential in intensive care units (ICU), especially to manage the risk of pancreatitis induced by propofol. However, some therapeutics in ICU such as intravenous ascorbic acid protocol, especially used in the context of Covid-19 could lead to false decrease of triglycerides by analytical disruption of Trinder reaction. We report here the case of a sample with unmeasurable triglyceride levels partly due to high plasma ascorbic acid levels. However, repeated measure on the same sample four days later revealed that interference mechanism on TG was still present whereas the level of ascorbic acid was very reduced by oxidation degradation. Hence, additional interference mechanism was suspected. After clinical investigation, we found that the patient had also received high doses of tacrolimus due to a transplant. As previous studies reported that tacrolimus treatment lead to a decrease of the measured plasma activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), we hypothesized that tacrolimus or related metabolites could also interfere by direct inhibition of LPL involved in TG analytical method used.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tacrolimus , Ascorbic Acid , Humans , Lipoprotein Lipase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Tacrolimus/adverse effects , Triglycerides
15.
Food Chem ; 382: 132251, 2022 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654433

ABSTRACT

Ascorbic acid (AA) and eugenol (EUG) are well-known antioxidants found in several fruits, spices and herbs. In particular, the EUG, one of the major phytocompounds present in clove, acts as pro-oxidant or anti-oxidant depending on its concentration. Considering the medical importance of AA and EUG and its extensive usage in the form of food and medicine, we have developed a voltammetric sensor based on hydroxyapatite-TiO2 composite modified GCE for their selective and simultaneous determination over very wide linear range of 2.78-2490 µM for AA and 1.4-78 µM for EUG with the LODs of 63.3 nM and 94 nM respectively. Practical applicability of the prepared electrode has been demonstrated by detecting AA and EUG in lemon juice, vitamin tablet, clove oil and Kabasura Kudineer, an herbal decoction used as an immunity booster against number of diseases including Covid-19. The proposed HAP-TiO2/GCE shall be useful for food and pharmaceutical industries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Graphite , Nanocomposites , Plants, Medicinal , Ascorbic Acid , Dopamine/analysis , Durapatite , Electrodes , Eugenol , Fruit/chemistry , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Titanium
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 717816, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595671

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Vitamin C has been reported to have beneficial effects on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin C supplementation on pathological parameters and survival duration of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 120 hospitalized critically ill patients infected with COVID-19. The intervention group (n = 31) received one capsule of 500 mg of vitamin C daily for 14 days. The control group (n = 69) received the same nutrition except for vitamin C supplements. Measurement of pathological and biochemical parameters was performed at baseline and after 2 weeks of the intervention. Results: Following 2 weeks of vitamin C supplementation, the level of serum K was significantly lower in the patients compared with the control group (3.93 vs. 4.21 mEq/L, p < 0.01). Vitamin C supplementation resulted in a higher mean survival duration compared with that of the control group (8 vs. 4 days, p < 0.01). There was a linear association between the number of days of vitamin C intake and survival duration (B = 1.66, p < 0.001). The vitamin C supplementation had no effect on blood glucose, mean arterial pressure, arterial blood gas (ABG) parameters, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), kidney function, cell blood count (CBC), hemoglobin (Hb), platelet (Plt), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), albumin, hematocrit (Hct), and other serum electrolytes including sodium (Na), calcium, and phosphorus (P). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated the potential of vitamin C supplementation in enhancing the survival duration of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Clinical Trial Registration: https://www.irct.ir/trial/55074, identifier IRCT20151226025699N5.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Illness , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Dietary Supplements , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/therapeutic use
17.
Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc ; 270: 120802, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593067

ABSTRACT

Ascorbic acid has recently been extensively used due to its role in the management of COVID-19 infections by stimulating the immune system and triggering phagocytosis of the corona virus. The currently used spectrofluorometric methods for determination of ascorbic acid require using derivatizing agents or fluorescent probes and suffer from a number of limitations, including slow reaction rates, low yield, limited sensitivity, long reaction times and high temperatures. In this work, we present a highly sensitive spectrofluorometric method for determination of ascorbic acid by switching-on the fluorescence of salicylate in presence of iron (III) due to a reduction of the cation to iron (II). The addition of ascorbic acid resulted in a corresponding enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of iron (III)-salicylate complex at emission wavelength = 411 nm. The method was found linear in the range of 1-8 µg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.035 µg/mL and 0.106 µg/mL, respectively. The developed method was applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in the commercially available dosage form; Ruta C60® tablets. The obtained results were compared with those obtained by a reported liquid chromatographic method at 95% confidence interval, no statistically significant differences were found between the developed and the reported methods. Yet, the developed spectrofluorometric method was found markedly greener than the reference method, based on the analytical Eco-scale and the green analytical procedure index. This work presents a simple, rapid and sensitive method that can possibly be applied for determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals, biological fluids and food samples.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spectrometry, Fluorescence , Tablets
18.
Complement Ther Med ; 64: 102797, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587977

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Vitamin C has anti-inflammatory effects. This review aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of high-dose intravenous vitamin C (HDIVC) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The following key phrases were searched for article inclusion: "Vitamin C OR ascorbic acid" AND "COVID-19 OR coronavirus disease 2019 OR severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 OR SARS-CoV-2″. Articles that utilized HDIVC for the management of patients with COVID-19 were included, whereas review articles and case reports were excluded from this review. Moreover, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate whether HDIVC can reduce the length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality rate of patients with severe COVID-19. RESULTS: In total, eight articles were included in this review, and five studies were included in the meta-analysis. The length of hospital stay was not significantly different between the HDIVC and control groups. Also, although our meta-analysis showed a tendency for HDIVC to reduce the in-hospital mortality rate in patients with severe COVID-19, the in-hospital mortality rate was not significantly different between patients treated with HDIVC and those who did not receive HDIVC. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence supporting the therapeutic use of HDICV in COVID-19 patients is lacking. Further studies are required for drawing a clear conclusion on this topic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Length of Stay , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamins
19.
Cardiovasc Hematol Disord Drug Targets ; 21(4): 235-242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573714

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The study aimed to assess the inhibitory effect of Vitamin C on angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which uses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-II) as the first route to infect human cells. Accordingly, agents with potential inhibition of ACE-II receptors might be effective in the prevention and management of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this work was to assess the possible inhibitory effect of ACE-II on ascorbic acid using an ex vivo approach based on the inhibition of diminazene-induced vasorelaxation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the present study, diminazene was used as a known specific inhibitor of ACE-II. Then, the vasorelaxant effect of ascorbic acid on diminazene-induced relaxation was examined using isolated aortic rings. All experiments of this study were evaluated on isolated aortic rings precontracted by epinephrine. RESULTS: The results confirmed that diminazene-induced vasorelaxation in a dose-dependent manner. More interestingly, ascorbic acid inhibited diminazene-induced vasorelaxation in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: This investigation provides valuable experimental proof of the efficacy of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) on inhibiting ex vivo vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme II, which is known among the pharmacological targets of anti-COVID-19 drugs.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid , COVID-19 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensins , Animals , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Humans , Rats , SARS-CoV-2
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