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2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 717816, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595671

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Vitamin C has been reported to have beneficial effects on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin C supplementation on pathological parameters and survival duration of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 120 hospitalized critically ill patients infected with COVID-19. The intervention group (n = 31) received one capsule of 500 mg of vitamin C daily for 14 days. The control group (n = 69) received the same nutrition except for vitamin C supplements. Measurement of pathological and biochemical parameters was performed at baseline and after 2 weeks of the intervention. Results: Following 2 weeks of vitamin C supplementation, the level of serum K was significantly lower in the patients compared with the control group (3.93 vs. 4.21 mEq/L, p < 0.01). Vitamin C supplementation resulted in a higher mean survival duration compared with that of the control group (8 vs. 4 days, p < 0.01). There was a linear association between the number of days of vitamin C intake and survival duration (B = 1.66, p < 0.001). The vitamin C supplementation had no effect on blood glucose, mean arterial pressure, arterial blood gas (ABG) parameters, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), kidney function, cell blood count (CBC), hemoglobin (Hb), platelet (Plt), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), albumin, hematocrit (Hct), and other serum electrolytes including sodium (Na), calcium, and phosphorus (P). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated the potential of vitamin C supplementation in enhancing the survival duration of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Clinical Trial Registration: https://www.irct.ir/trial/55074, identifier IRCT20151226025699N5.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Illness , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Dietary Supplements , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/therapeutic use
3.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(5): 672-682, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493295

ABSTRACT

While the use of vitamin C as a therapeutic agent has been investigated since the 1950s, there has been substantial recent interest in the role of vitamin C supplementation in critical illness and particularly, sepsis and septic shock. Humans cannot synthesize vitamin C and rely on exogenous intake to maintain a plasma concentration of approximately 70 to 80 µmol/L. Vitamin C, in healthy humans, is involved with antioxidant function, wound healing, endothelial function, and catecholamine synthesis. Its function in the human body informs the theoretical basis for why vitamin C supplementation may be beneficial in sepsis/septic shock.Critically ill patients can be vitamin C deficient due to low dietary intake, increased metabolic demands, inefficient recycling of vitamin C metabolites, and loss due to renal replacement therapy. Intravenous supplementation is required to achieve supraphysiologic serum levels of vitamin C. While some clinical studies of intravenous vitamin C supplementation in sepsis have shown improvements in secondary outcome measures, none of the randomized clinical trials have shown differences between vitamin C supplementation and standard of care and/or placebo in the primary outcome measures of the trials. There are some ongoing studies of high-dose vitamin C administration in patients with sepsis and coronavirus disease 2019; the majority of evidence so far does not support the routine supplementation of vitamin C in patients with sepsis or septic shock.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Vitamins/pharmacology , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/adverse effects , Ascorbic Acid Deficiency/physiopathology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Critical Illness , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Vasoconstrictor Agents/pharmacology , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/adverse effects
4.
Pharmacol Res ; 169: 105665, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433725

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have reported that vitamin C supplementation may decrease lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the influence of vitamin C supplementation on lipid profile in patients with T2DM. Studies examining the effects of vitamin C supplementation on lipid profile in patients with T2DM, published up to November 2020, were identified through PubMed, SCOPUS, and Embase databases. 15 studies, including 872 participants, were included and analyzed using a random-effects model to calculate weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Findings from 15 studies indicated that vitamin C supplementation significantly decreased Triglyceride (TG) (WMD: -16.48 mg/dl, 95% CI (-31.89, -1.08), P < 0.001) and total cholesterol (TC) (WMD: -13.00 mg/dl, 95% CI (-23.10, -2.91), P < 0.001) in patients with T2DM. However, vitamin C supplementation failed to improve LDL and HDL. The meta-regression analysis suggested that lipid profile improvement was affected by duration of vitamin C treatment. Dose-response analysis showed that vitamin C supplementation changed LDL significantly based on vitamin C dose. According to our findings, vitamin C supplementation significantly improved lipid profile via decreases in TG and TC. However, vitamin C failed to affect LDL and HDL in diabetic populations. It appears that vitamin C supplementation is more beneficial to lipid profile in long-term vs. short term interventions.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Lipids/blood , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Dietary Supplements , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Lipid Metabolism/drug effects
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17648, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392882

ABSTRACT

Ascorbic acid represents an appealing option for clinicians to utilize in the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic due to its proposed clinical efficacy, relative safety, and low cost. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of using ascorbic acid in supplemental doses as adjunctive therapy for patients critically ill with COVID-19. This was a two-center, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study. All critically ill adult patients admitted to ICU with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis between March 1st and December 31st, 2020, were included in the final analysis. The study was conducted at two large governmental tertiary hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The purpose was to investigate the clinical outcomes of low-dose ascorbic acid as adjunctive therapy in COVID-19 after propensity score matching using baseline severity scores, systematic use of corticosteroids, and study centers. A number of 739 patients were included in this study, among whom 296 patients were included after propensity score matching. There was no association between the administration of ascorbic acid and in-hospital mortality or the 30-day mortality [OR (95% CI) 0.77 (0.47, 1.23), p value = 0.27 and OR (95% CI) 0.73 (0.43, 1.20), p value = 0.21, respectively]. Using ascorbic acid was associated with a lower incidence of thrombosis compared with the non-ascorbic-acid group [6.1% vs. 13% respectively; OR (95% CI) 0.42 (0.184, 0.937), p value = 0.03]. Low dose of ascorbic acid as an adjunctive therapy in COVID-19 critically ill patients was not associated with mortality benefits, but it was associated with a lower incidence of thrombosis. Further studies are required to confirm these findings.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
6.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Mar 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383900

ABSTRACT

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a normal liver metabolite in most animals, with humans being a notable exception due to random genetic mutations that have occurred during our evolution [...].


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacokinetics , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Epigenesis, Genetic , Humans , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/drug therapy
7.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1508-1510, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343639

ABSTRACT

The outbreak and pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 in 2019 has caused a severe public health burden and will challenge global health for the future. The discovery and mechanistic investigation of drugs against Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is in deadly demand. The paper published by Li and colleagues proposed the hypothesis that vitamin C combined with glycyrrhizic acid in treating COVID-19 and its mechanistic investigation was performed by a database-based network pharmacology. In this letter, we present critical comments on the limitations and insufficiencies involved, from both the perspective of network pharmacology and current evidence on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Repositioning , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/virology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
8.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1161-1174, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343620

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a fatal and fast-spreading viral infection. To date, the number of COVID-19 patients worldwide has crossed over six million with over three hundred and seventy thousand deaths (according to the data from World Health Organization; updated on 2 June 2020). Although COVID-19 can be rapidly diagnosed, efficient clinical treatment of COVID-19 remains unavailable, resulting in high fatality. Some clinical trials have identified vitamin C (VC) as a potent compound pneumonia management. In addition, glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is clinically as an anti-inflammatory medicine against pneumonia-induced inflammatory stress. We hypothesized that the combination of VC and GA is a potential option for treating COVID-19. METHODS: The aim of this study was to determine pharmacological targets and molecular mechanisms of VC + GA treatment for COVID-19, using bioinformational network pharmacology. RESULTS: We uncovered optimal targets, biological processes and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of VC + GA against COVID-19. Our findings suggested that combinatorial VC and GA treatment for COVID-19 was associated with elevation of immunity and suppression of inflammatory stress, including activation of the T cell receptor signaling pathway, regulation of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, ErbB signaling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway. We also identified 17 core targets of VC + GA, which suggest as antimicrobial function. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, our study uncovered the pharmacological mechanism underlying combined VC and GA treatment for COVID-19. These results should benefit efforts to address the most pressing problem currently facing the world.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Computational Biology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans
9.
Cornea ; 40(11): 1502-1504, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328949

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease 2019 global pandemic is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Several ophthalmic manifestations have been reported to be associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection, including conjunctivitis, acute sixth nerve palsy, and multiple cranial neuropathies. We present a unique case of unilateral phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis in a 5-year-old boy in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Conjunctivitis, Viral/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Viral/diagnosis , Keratoconjunctivitis/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Administration, Oral , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child, Preschool , Conjunctivitis, Viral/drug therapy , Conjunctivitis, Viral/virology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Eye Infections, Viral/drug therapy , Eye Infections, Viral/virology , Fluorometholone/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Keratoconjunctivitis/drug therapy , Keratoconjunctivitis/virology , Male , Ophthalmic Solutions , Slit Lamp Microscopy , Tomography, Optical Coherence , Visual Acuity/physiology
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(26): e26427, 2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly spread to other countries, causing numerous deaths and challenges for organizations and health professionals. Diet and nutrition invariably influence the competence of the immune system and determine the risk and severity of infections. Studies have already been published on the relationships through which vitamins C and D can mitigate the severity of infections such as COVID-19. In this context, this protocol describes a systematic review intended to analyze if vitamin C and D supplementation can reduce the severity of Covid-19. METHODS: This protocol was developed based on the recommendations of PRISMA-P. In order to accomplish the systematic review, we will carry out searches in the PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane, and ScienceDirect databases in the quest for control case studies that analyze the supplementation and evolution of patients with COVID-19. There will be no limitations related to language or publication time. The searches will be carried out by 2 independent researchers who will select the articles, and then the duplicate studies will be removed, while the suitable ones will be selected using the Rayyan QCRI application. In order to assess the risk of bias, we will use the instrument proposed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Moreover, we will carry out metaanalyses and subgroup analyses according to the conditions of the included data. RESULTS: This review will assess the association between vitamin C and D supplementation and the reduction in the severity of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The findings of this systematic review will summarize the latest evidence for the association between vitamin C and D supplementation and COVID-19 through a systematic review and meta-analysis. RECORD OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEW: CRD42021255763.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , Dietary Supplements , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Severity of Illness Index , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Humans , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 616, 2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients frequently suffer from vitamin C deficiency. Previous studies showed that high doses of vitamin C administration had conflicting results on clinical outcomes in patients with severe sepsis, burns, and trauma. Because of the high incidence and morbidity/mortality with severe pneumonia, we aimed to investigate the effect of administration of high dose vitamin C in critically ill patients with severe pneumonia. METHODS: Eighty critically ill patients with pneumonia were enrolled in this randomized double-blinded clinical trial. Patients with a CURB-65 score > 3, one major criterion, or ≥ 3 minor criteria were considered as severe pneumonia. Patients were randomly assigned to intervention or placebo groups receiving standard treatment plus 60 mg/kg/day vitamin C as a continuous infusion or normal saline in the same volume correspondingly for 96 h. Serum levels of vitamin C were noted at baseline and 48 h after vitamin C administration. Duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU length of stay, PaO2/FiO2, and mortality rate were noted for all patients till the 28th day. Any complications related to the vitamin C administration were recorded. RESULTS: Duration of mechanical ventilation and vasopressor use were significantly lower in the intervention group (p: < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Baseline levels of vitamin C in both groups did not have a significant difference but its levels increased in the intervention group and decreased in the control group during the study period. Mortality rate insignificantly decreased in the intervention group (p = 0.17). Three patients showed hypotension and tachycardia during the administration of vitamin C which was self-limited with decreasing the dose of vitamin C. Our results showed that the intravenous administration of a relatively high dose of vitamin C to critically ill patients with severe pneumonia was safe and could decrease the inflammation, duration of mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use without any significant effect on mortality. TRIAL REGISTRATION: IRCT registration number: IRCT20190312043030N1, Registration date: 2019-08-26, Seied Hadi Saghaleini.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Critical Care/methods , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Ascorbic Acid/blood , Critical Illness , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
12.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 318, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278710

ABSTRACT

Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a sleep disorder characterized by the sudden urge to move the lower limbs during periods of rest accompanied by an unpleasant sensation like tingling or burning in the legs. Often, this urge is partially relieved by the movement of legs. However, it causes disturbance of sleep leading to daytime fatigue. Herein, we present an unusual case of new-onset of restless leg syndrome in a COVID-19 infected patient who presented three weeks after an uncomplicated delivery via caesarean section. The patient was managed with sleep hygiene measures, oral iron and vitamin C tablets apart from general COVID-19 management medications, subsequently leading to significant improvements. Here we have discussed possible associated factors, pathophysiological mechanisms and management of RLS in the case of COVID infected individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Restless Legs Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Iron Compounds/administration & dosage , Pregnancy , Restless Legs Syndrome/virology , Sleep Hygiene
13.
Nutr Hosp ; 38(3): 622-630, 2021 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264738

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Compared with adults, children with SARS-CoV-2 infection may have fewer and less severe symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms are commonly reported in children, sometimes as the only manifestation of the disease, and most often manifest as anorexia, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, or abdominal pain. Although most children have asymptomatic or mild disease, 10 % of those infected may experience serious or critical disease, or even death. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome is a rare but serious condition recently reported in children with COVID-19. Studies indicate that children with obesity are at higher risk of developing severe COVID-19, and inflammation associated with obesity could be one of the factors that worsens COVID-19 symptoms due to an increased inflammatory response involving molecules such as interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and monocyte chemoattractant protein. On the other hand, evidence has been reported of a higher protein expression of ACE2 in the visceral adipose tissue of obese and malnourished humans, and this could be associated with complications and severity of COVID-19. Therefore, regulation of the intake of macronutrients or micronutrients could be used as a strategy to reduce the consequences of COVID-19. Diet in general and bioactive compounds could play an important role in the prevention of the inflammatory cascade. The micronutrients with the most evidence suggesting a role in immune support are vitamins C and D, zinc, and polyphenols.


INTRODUCCIÓN: La enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) está causada por el virus "síndrome respiratorio agudo severo-coronavirus 2" (SARS-CoV-2). En comparación con los adultos, los niños con infección por SARS-CoV-2 pueden tener menos síntomas y estos pueden ser menos graves. Los síntomas gastrointestinales se informan comúnmente en los niños, a veces como única manifestación de la enfermedad. Los más comunes son anorexia, diarrea, náuseas y vómitos, y dolor abdominal. Aunque la mayoría de los niños tienen un cuadro leve o asintomático, el 10 % de los infectados pueden experimentar un cuadro grave o crítico, e incluso la muerte. El síndrome inflamatorio multisistémico es una afección poco común, pero grave, que se documentó recientemente en niños con COVID-19. Los estudios indican que los niños con obesidad tienen mayor riesgo de desarrollar COVID-19 grave, y la inflamación asociada con la obesidad podría ser uno de los factores que empeoran los síntomas de la COVID-19 debido a una respuesta inflamatoria aumentada en donde se ven involucradas moléculas como la interleucina 6, el factor de necrosis tumoral alfa y la proteína quimioatrayente de monocitos. Por otro lado, se ha encontrado evidencia de una mayor expresión proteica de ACE2 en el tejido adiposo visceral de los seres humanos obesos y desnutridos, y esto podría estar asociado a las complicaciones y la severidad de la COVID-19. Por tanto, la regulación de la ingesta de macronutrientes o micronutrientes podría utilizarse como estrategia para reducir las consecuencias de la enfermedad. La dieta en general y los compuestos bioactivos podrían desempeñar un papel importante en la prevención de la cascada inflamatoria. Los micronutrientes con mayor evidencia indicativa de que desempeñan un papel en el apoyo inmunológico son las vitaminas C y D, el zinc y los polifenoles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Pediatric Obesity/complications , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anorexia/etiology , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Child , Diarrhea/etiology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Male , Nausea/etiology , Overweight/complications , Oxidative Stress , Pediatric Obesity/metabolism , Polyphenols/administration & dosage , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Thinness/complications , Thinness/metabolism , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vomiting/etiology , Zinc/administration & dosage , Zinc/deficiency
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25876, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients infected with a virus usually lack vitamin C. High-dose vitamin C has an antiviral effect, and has been used by several researchers to treat COVID-19 by intravenous infusion, achieving good results. However, the efficacy and safety of vitamin C in the treatment of patients with COVID-19 remain unclear. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of high-dose vitamin C infusion in the treatment of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched, including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure database, Chinese Wanfang database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature database. The aim was to collect randomized controlled trials of high-dose vitamin C infusion in the treatment of patients with COVID-19, with the retrieval time being from the establishment of the database to March 2021. In accordance with the pre-designed inclusion/exclusion criteria, all data were extracted independently by 2 researchers. To assess the risk bias in the studies, the Cochrane collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used to assess the risk bias in the studies, while meta-analysis was performed using Revman 5.3 software. RESULTS: In the present study, a high-quality comprehensive evaluation is provided of high-dose vitamin C infusion in the treatment of patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Further convincing evidence for the clinical treatment of COVID-19 is provided, in addition to evidence-based guidance for clinical practice. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021246342.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/adverse effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Interleukin-6/blood , Length of Stay , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/adverse effects
15.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178371

ABSTRACT

More than one year has passed since the first cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2 coronavirus were reported in Wuhan (China), rapidly evolving into a global pandemic. This infectious disease has become a major public health challenge in the world. Unfortunately, to date, no specific antivirals have been proven to be effective against COVID-19, and although a few vaccines are available, the mortality rate is not decreasing but is still increasing. One therapeutic strategy has been focused on infection prevention and control measures. In this regard, the use of nutraceutical supports may play a role against some aspect of the infection, particularly the inflammatory state and the immune system function of patients, thus representing a strategy to control the worst outcomes of this pandemic. For this reason, we performed an overview including meta-analyses and systematic reviews to assess the association among melatonin, vitamin C, vitamin D, zinc supplementation and inflammatory markers using three databases, namely, MEDLINE, PubMed Central and the Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews. According to the evidence available, an intake of 50,000 IU/month of vitamin D showed efficacy in CRP. An amount of 1 to 2 g per day of vitamin C demonstrated efficacy both in CRP and endothelial function, and a dosage of melatonin ranging from 5 to 25 mg /day showed good evidence of efficacy in CRP, TNF and IL6. A dose of 50 mg/day of elemental zinc supplementation showed positive results in CRP. Based on the data reported in this review, the public health system could consider whether it is possible to supplement the current limited preventive measures through targeted nutraceutical large-scale administration.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Melatonin/administration & dosage , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Zinc/administration & dosage , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Meta-Analysis as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Trace Elements/administration & dosage , Vitamins/administration & dosage
16.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167677

ABSTRACT

Vitamin C is an essential nutrient that serves as antioxidant and plays a major role as co-factor and modulator of various pathways of the immune system. Its therapeutic effect during infections has been a matter of debate, with conflicting results in studies of respiratory infections and in critically ill patients. This comprehensive review aimed to summarize the current evidence regarding the use of vitamin C in the prevention or treatment of patients with SARS-CoV2 infection, based on available publications between January 2020 and February 2021. Overall, 21 publications were included in this review, consisting of case-reports and case-series, observational studies, and some clinical trials. In many of the publications, data were incomplete, and in most clinical trials the results are still pending. No studies regarding prevention of COVID-19 with vitamin C supplementation were found. Although some clinical observations reported improved medical condition of patients with COVID-19 treated with vitamin C, available data from controlled studies are scarce and inconclusive. Based on the theoretical background presented in this article, and some preliminary encouraging studies, the role of vitamin C in the treatment of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection should be further investigated.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Antioxidants/administration & dosage , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Child , Clinical Trials as Topic , Dietary Supplements , Drug Administration Routes , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Vitamins/administration & dosage
17.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160962

ABSTRACT

Fatigue is common not only in cancer patients but also after viral and other infections. Effective treatment options are still very rare. Therefore, the present knowledge on the pathophysiology of fatigue and the potential positive impact of treatment with vitamin C is illustrated. Additionally, the effectiveness of high-dose IV vitamin C in fatigue resulting from various diseases was assessed by a systematic literature review in order to assess the feasibility of vitamin C in post-viral, especially in long COVID, fatigue. Nine clinical studies with 720 participants were identified. Three of the four controlled trials observed a significant decrease in fatigue scores in the vitamin C group compared to the control group. Four of the five observational or before-and-after studies observed a significant reduction in pre-post levels of fatigue. Attendant symptoms of fatigue such as sleep disturbances, lack of concentration, depression, and pain were also frequently alleviated. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and circulatory disorders, which are important contributors to fatigue, are also discussed in long COVID fatigue. Thus, the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, endothelial-restoring, and immunomodulatory effects of high-dose IV vitamin C might be a suitable treatment option.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/drug therapy , Fatigue/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/pathology , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Injections, Intravenous
18.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 91, 2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 infection in kidney transplant recipients often lead to allograft dysfunction. The allograft injury has various histopathological manifestations. Our case illustrates the unusual combination of allograft rejection, acute kidney injury secondary to oxalate nephropathy and SARS CoV-2 nephropathy as the cause of irreversible allograft failure. CASE PRESENTATION: A 56 year old renal allograft recipient presented with a history of fever and diarrhoea for the preceding 4 weeks, tested positive for Sars-CoV2 on nasal swab and was found to have severe allograft dysfunction, necessitating haemodialysis. He subsequently underwent an allograft biopsy, which demonstrated antibody mediated rejection along with the presence of extensive oxalate deposition in the tubules. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated spherical spiked particles in the glomerular capillary endothelium and the presence of tubulo-reticular inclusions suggestive of an active COVID-19 infection within the kidney. The intra-tubular oxalate deposition was considered to be the result of high dose, supplemental Vitamin C used as an immune booster in many patients with COVID - 19 infection in India. CONCLUSIONS: This case highlights the complex pathology that may be seen in following COVID-19 disease and the need for kidney biopsies in these patients to better understand the aetiology of disease.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Graft Rejection/etiology , Hyperoxaluria/complications , Kidney Transplantation , Primary Graft Dysfunction/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Kidney Diseases/complications , Kidney Diseases/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Graft Dysfunction/pathology , Primary Graft Dysfunction/virology
19.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(2): 209-213, 2021 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125205

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is declared as pandemic by the World Health Orgnazation (WHO) on March 2020. One of the heavily utilized measures during this pandemic is vitamin C (aka ascorbic acid). Unfortunately, vitamin C has been associated with glucose measurement interference and thus this study highlights the elevated levels of blood glucose correlated with the presence of vitamin C interference. METHODOLOGY: Thirty samples were selected randomly and the blood glucose were measured prior and post the addition of spiked standard concentrations of vitamin C. The interference of vitamin C with glucose readings in COVID-19 pandemic were evaluated and observed employing the Auto Chemistry Analyzer machine. RESULTS: The addition of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) standards (spikes) into the isolated samples shows a correlated increment in the reading measures. Thereafter, the increments of Random Blood Sugar (RBS) readings after being spiked with the vitamin C standards shows a logarithmic correlation with good interesting R-squared (R2 = 0.9921). CONCLUSIONS: The authors find that the presence of vitamin C in blood actively and significantly alters the glucose level readings especially with the highly consumption of vitamin C during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/blood , Blood Glucose/analysis , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Humans
20.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0247163, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ivermectin is one among several potential drugs explored for its therapeutic and preventive role in SARS-CoV-2 infection. The study was aimed to explore the association between ivermectin prophylaxis and the development of SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare workers. METHODS: A hospital-based matched case-control study was conducted among healthcare workers of AIIMS Bhubaneswar, India, from September to October 2020. Profession, gender, age and date of diagnosis were matched for 186 case-control pairs. Cases and controls were healthcare workers who tested positive and negative, respectively, for COVID-19 by RT-PCR. Exposure was defined as the intake of ivermectin and/or hydroxychloroquine and/or vitamin-C and/or other prophylaxis for COVID-19. Data collection and entry was done in Epicollect5, and analysis was performed using STATA version 13. Conditional logistic regression models were used to describe the associated factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Ivermectin prophylaxis was taken by 76 controls and 41 cases. Two-dose ivermectin prophylaxis (AOR 0.27, 95% CI, 0.15-0.51) was associated with a 73% reduction of SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare workers for the following month. Those involved in physical activity (AOR 3.06 95% CI, 1.18-7.93) for more than an hour/day were more likely to contract SARS-CoV-2 infection. Type of household, COVID duty, single-dose ivermectin prophylaxis, vitamin-C prophylaxis and hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis were not associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. CONCLUSION: Two-dose ivermectin prophylaxis at a dose of 300 µg/kg with a gap of 72 hours was associated with a 73% reduction of SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare workers for the following month. Chemoprophylaxis has relevance in the containment of pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Ivermectin/therapeutic use , Adult , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Chemoprevention/methods , Drug Combinations , Female , Humans , India , Ivermectin/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged
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