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2.
Acta Med Acad ; 49(2): 130-143, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414828

ABSTRACT

In this review, we discuss the latest developments in research pertaining to virus-induced asthma exacerbations and consider recent advances in treatment options. Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways that continues to impose a substantial clinical burden worldwide. Asthma exacerbations, characterised by an acute deterioration in respiratory symptoms and airflow obstruction, are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. These episodes are most commonly triggered by respiratory virus infections. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of virus-induced exacerbations have been the focus of extensive biomedical research. Developing a robust understanding of the interplay between respiratory viruses and the host immune response will be critical for developing more efficacious, targeted therapies for exacerbations. CONCLUSION: There has been significant recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying virus-induced airway inflammation in asthma and these advances will underpin the development of future clinical therapies.


Subject(s)
Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Adenovirus Infections, Human/drug therapy , Adenovirus Infections, Human/immunology , Adenovirus Infections, Human/physiopathology , Administration, Inhalation , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/physiopathology , Interferon-beta/therapeutic use , Macrolides/therapeutic use , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Paramyxoviridae Infections/drug therapy , Paramyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Paramyxoviridae Infections/physiopathology , Picornaviridae Infections/drug therapy , Picornaviridae Infections/immunology , Picornaviridae Infections/physiopathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/physiopathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/physiopathology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/physiopathology
4.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol ; 21(6): 597-601, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429314

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: As of June 2021, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) exceeded 180 million reported cases and was responsible for almost 4 million deaths globally. Asthma affects approximately 262 million people worldwide and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Presently, it appears asthma is neither associated with an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 nor with a risk of severe COVID-19 or COVID-19 related death. Regarding the severe asthma patients on biologics, questions remain. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence regarding the relationship between asthma, biologics and COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: The available evidence does not suggest that severe asthmatics on treatment with biologics have a higher risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection compared to the general population. It does not appear that they have a higher risk of severe disease or COVID-19 related death either. SUMMARY: This review suggests that treatment with biologics for severe asthma is safe and should be maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, more studies are needed to address this question and the role of biological therapy on different asthma phenotypes.


Subject(s)
Asthma/drug therapy , Biological Products/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/immunology , Biological Products/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Clin Exp Allergy ; 50(10): 1122-1126, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388225

ABSTRACT

Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) such as HCoV-229E or OC43 are responsible for mild upper airway infections, whereas highly pathogenic HCoVs, including SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, often evoke acute, heavy pneumonias. They tend to induce immune responses based on interferon and host inflammatory cytokine production and promotion of T1 immune profile. Less is known about their effect on T2-type immunity. Unlike human rhinoviruses (HRV) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), HCoVs are not considered as a dominant risk factor of severe exacerbations of asthma, mostly T2-type chronic inflammatory disease. The relationship between coronaviruses and T2-type immunity, especially in asthma and allergy, is not well understood. This review aims to summarize currently available knowledge about the relationship of HCoVs, including novel SARS-CoV-2, with asthma and allergic inflammation.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Hypersensitivity/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Asthma/virology , Coronavirus/immunology , Humans , Hypersensitivity/virology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 678661, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337638

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased risk of severe COVID-19, but the mechanisms are unclear. Besides, patients with severe COVID-19 have been reported to have increased levels of several immune mediators. Methods: Ninety-two proteins were quantified in 315 plasma samples from 118 asthmatics, 99 COPD patients and 98 healthy controls (age 40-90 years), who were recruited in Colombia before the COVID-19 pandemic. Protein levels were compared between each disease group and healthy controls. Significant proteins were compared to the gene signatures of SARS-CoV-2 infection reported in the "COVID-19 Drug and Gene Set Library" and with experimentally tested protein biomarkers of severe COVID-19. Results: Forty-one plasma proteins showed differences between patients and controls. Asthmatic patients have increased levels in IL-6 while COPD patients have a broader systemic inflammatory dysregulation driven by HGF, OPG, and several chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CX3CL1, CXCL1, MCP-3, MCP-4, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL11). These proteins are involved in chemokine signaling pathways related with response to viral infections and some, were found up-regulated upon SARS-CoV-2 experimental infection of Calu-3 cells as reported in the COVID-19 Related Gene Sets database. An increase of HPG, CXCL9, CXCL10, IL-6, MCP-3, TNF and EN-RAGE has also been experimentally detected in patients with severe COVID-19. Conclusions: COPD patients have altered levels of plasma proteins that have been reported increased in patients with severe COVID-19. Our study suggests that COPD patients have a systemic dysregulation in chemokine networks (including HGF and CXCL9) that could make them more susceptible to severe COVID-19. Also, that IL-6 levels are increased in some asthmatic patients (especially in females) and this may influence their response to COVID-19. The findings in this study depict a novel panel of inflammatory plasma proteins in COPD patients that may potentially associate with increased susceptibility to severe COVID-19 and might be useful as a biomarker signature after future experimental validation.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asthma/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Chemokine CXCL9/blood , Female , Hepatocyte Growth Factor/blood , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation
8.
Viruses ; 12(10)2020 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305816

ABSTRACT

Accurate detection of human respiratory viral infections is highly topical. We investigated how strongly inflammatory biomarkers (FeNO, eosinophils, neutrophils, and cytokines in nasal lavage fluid) and lung function parameters change upon rhinovirus 16 infection, in order to explore their potential use for infection detection. To this end, within a longitudinal cohort study, healthy and mildly asthmatic volunteers were experimentally inoculated with rhinovirus 16, and time series of these parameters/biomarkers were systematically recorded and compared between the pre- and post-infection phases of the study, which lasted two months and one month, respectively. We found that the parameters'/biomarkers' ability to discriminate between the infected and the uninfected state varied over the observation time period. Consistently over time, the concentration of cytokines, in nasal lavage fluid, showed moderate to very good discrimination performance, thereby qualifying for disease progression monitoring, whereas lung function and FeNO, while quickly and non-invasively measurable using cheap portable devices (e.g., at airports), performed poorly.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , Asthma/virology , Inflammation/diagnosis , Picornaviridae Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Adult , Biomarkers/analysis , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Nose/immunology , Picornaviridae Infections/immunology , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Function Tests , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Rhinovirus , Young Adult
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288907

ABSTRACT

Eosinophils are complex granulocytes with the capacity to react upon diverse stimuli due to their numerous and variable surface receptors, which allows them to respond in very different manners. Traditionally believed to be only part of parasitic and allergic/asthmatic immune responses, as scientific studies arise, the paradigm about these cells is continuously changing, adding layers of complexity to their roles in homeostasis and disease. Developing principally in the bone marrow by the action of IL-5 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor GM-CSF, eosinophils migrate from the blood to very different organs, performing multiple functions in tissue homeostasis as in the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, uterus, mammary glands, liver, and skeletal muscle. In organs such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract, eosinophils are able to act as immune regulatory cells and also to perform direct actions against parasites, and bacteria, where novel mechanisms of immune defense as extracellular DNA traps are key factors. Besides, eosinophils, are of importance in an effective response against viral pathogens by their nuclease enzymatic activity and have been lately described as involved in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 immunity. The pleiotropic role of eosinophils is sustained because eosinophils can be also detrimental to human physiology, for example, in diseases like allergies, asthma, and eosinophilic esophagitis, where exosomes can be significant pathophysiologic units. These eosinophilic pathologies, require specific treatments by eosinophils control, such as new monoclonal antibodies like mepolizumab, reslizumab, and benralizumab. In this review, we describe the roles of eosinophils as effectors and regulatory cells and their involvement in pathological disorders and treatment.


Subject(s)
Eosinophils/physiology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Eosinophilic Esophagitis/drug therapy , Eosinophilic Esophagitis/immunology , Eosinophilic Esophagitis/pathology , Eosinophils/cytology , Eosinophils/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Humans , Plasma Cells/cytology , Plasma Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
10.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259626

ABSTRACT

Epithelial characteristics underlying the differential susceptibility of chronic asthma to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) and other viral infections are currently unclear. By revisiting transcriptomic data from patients with Th2 low versus Th2 high asthma, as well as mild, moderate, and severe asthmatics, we characterized the changes in expression of human coronavirus and influenza viral entry genes relative to sex, airway location, and disease endotype. We found sexual dimorphism in the expression of SARS-CoV-2-related genes ACE2, TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and SLC6A19. ACE2 receptor downregulation occurred specifically in females in Th2 high asthma, while proteases broadly assisting coronavirus and influenza viral entry, TMPRSS2, and TMPRSS4, were highly upregulated in both sexes. Overall, changes in SARS-CoV-2-related gene expression were specific to the Th2 high molecular endotype of asthma and different by asthma severity and airway location. The downregulation of ACE2 (COVID-19, SARS) and ANPEP (HCoV-229E) viral receptors wascorrelated with loss of club and ciliated cells in Th2 high asthma. Meanwhile, the increase in DPP4 (MERS-CoV), ST3GAL4, and ST6GAL1 (influenza) was associated with increased goblet and basal activated cells. Overall, this study elucidates sex, airway location, disease endotype, and changes in epithelial heterogeneity as potential factors underlying asthmatic susceptibility, or lack thereof, to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions , Influenza, Human/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Asthma/genetics , Asthma/virology , COVID-19/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Epithelial Cells/classification , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , Male , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sex Characteristics
11.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 127(4): 446-450.e1, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has highlighted the importance of accurate capture of vaccine, and vaccine component, allergy. There remains a gap in the prevalence literature from the perspective of direct primary care provider (PCP) reporting at a population level. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of PCP-documented vaccine and polyethylene glycol (PEG) allergy using electronic medical record data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study using the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network repository. Machine learning algorithms were applied to evaluate for vaccine allergy documentation, and Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical codes were used for PEG allergy or allergy to common injectable medications containing PEG (CIMCP). RESULTS: The prevalence of PCP-documented vaccine allergy in Canada was 0.037% (395/1,055,677) and of PEG allergy was 0.0009% (10/1,055,677). In total, 0.01% of patients had a documented allergy to either PEG or CIMCP (135/1,055,677). None of the patients with PEG allergy had a documented allergy to a CIMCP. Patients with vaccine allergy and PEG allergy were significantly more likely to have other atopic comorbidities, including asthma (P < .001 for both), eczema (P < .001 and P = .001, respectively), rhinitis (P = .002 and P < .001, respectively), and food allergy (P < .001 for both). Significantly higher rates of depression (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively) and anxiety (P = .003 and P < .001, respectively) were found in those with vaccine allergy, or PEG allergy, than those without vaccine allergy or PEG allergy. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to estimate the prevalence of vaccine and PEG allergy in a national cohort that uses PCP documentation, revealing a low reported rate of vaccine allergy and PEG allergy.


Subject(s)
Hypersensitivity, Immediate/epidemiology , Hypersensitivity, Immediate/immunology , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Polyethylene Glycols/adverse effects , Vaccines/adverse effects , Adult , Algorithms , Anxiety/immunology , Asthma/epidemiology , Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Canada/epidemiology , Documentation/methods , Eczema/epidemiology , Eczema/immunology , Electronic Health Records , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Primary Health Care/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines/immunology
12.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 127(3): 312-317, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220652

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To present an update of birth cohort study designs and their contributions to allergic risk. DATA SOURCES: The PubMed database was used to search for relevant articles. STUDY SELECTIONS: Peer-reviewed prospective and retrospective studies involving the assessment of allergy using human birth cohorts between 2014 and 2021 were evaluated. RESULTS: Parental history of allergic diseases, especially in cases involving both parents, is associated with increased risk of allergy. Exposure to prenatal and postnatal smoking and limited diet diversity were associated with increased allergic burden. The impact of early-life infections and antibiotics on disease development may be associated with the onset of asthma, though this remains debated. Cohort studies also revealed that the mode of delivery and breastfeeding duration affect the odds ratio of asthma and eczema development. Household exposures, including pets, house dust mites, and scented aeroallergens may confer protective effects, whereas high air pollution exposure and low socioeconomic status may be risk enhancing. Exposure to antibiotics during early life may be associated with increased asthma risk, whereas viral infections may lead to disease protection, though the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on allergic risk is yet to be understood. CONCLUSION: Although evaluating the risk of allergic disease development is complex, clinicians can apply these insights on the multifactorial nature of atopy to better understand and potentially mitigate disease development.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , Breast Feeding/methods , Diet/methods , Eczema/immunology , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Inheritance Patterns/immunology , Allergens/administration & dosage , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Asthma/etiology , Asthma/genetics , Asthma/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Eczema/etiology , Eczema/genetics , Eczema/prevention & control , Environmental Exposure/adverse effects , Environmental Pollutants/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Hypersensitivity/etiology , Hypersensitivity/genetics , Hypersensitivity/prevention & control , Pets/immunology , Pregnancy , Pyroglyphidae/chemistry , Pyroglyphidae/immunology , Risk Factors , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology
13.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186898

ABSTRACT

Macrophages play an important role in the innate and adaptive immune responses of organ systems, including the lungs, to particles and pathogens. Cumulative results show that macrophages contribute to the development and progression of acute or chronic inflammatory responses through the secretion of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and the activation of transcription factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases, such as acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ARDS related to COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)), allergic asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). This review summarizes the functions of macrophages and their associated underlying mechanisms in the development of ALI, ARDS, COVID-19-related ARDS, allergic asthma, COPD, and IPF and briefly introduces the acute and chronic experimental animal models. Thus, this review suggests an effective therapeutic approach that focuses on the regulation of macrophage function in the context of inflammatory lung diseases.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Macrophages/pathology , Pneumonia/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Animals , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , Chronic Disease , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/immunology , Pneumonia/immunology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
14.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol ; 59(1): 78-88, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139385

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), and abnormal, overactivated innate immunity and "cytokine storms" have been proposed as potential pathological mechanisms for rapid COVID-19 progression. Theoretically, asthmatic patients should have increased susceptibility and severity for SARS-CoV-2 infection due to a deficient antiviral immune response and the tendency for exacerbation elicited by common respiratory viruses. However, existing studies have not shown an expected prevalence of asthmatic individuals among COVID-19 patients. Certain aspects of type 2 immune response, including type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, etc.) and accumulation of eosinophils, might provide potential protective effects against COVID-19. Furthermore, conventional therapeutics for asthma, including inhaled corticosteroids, allergen immunotherapy (AIT), and anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, might also reduce the risks of asthmatics suffering infection of the virus through alleviating inflammation or enhancing antiviral defense. The interactions between COVID-19 and asthma deserve further attention and clarification.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Administration, Inhalation , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/therapy , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Desensitization, Immunologic , Disease Progression , Eosinophils/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-13/immunology , Interleukin-4/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Natural Killer T-Cells/immunology , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Th2 Cells/immunology
15.
Allergy ; 76(2): 483-496, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impacts of chronic airway diseases on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are far from understood. OBJECTIVE: To explore the influence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) comorbidity on disease expression and outcomes, and the potential underlying mechanisms in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 961 hospitalized COVID-19 patients with a definite clinical outcome (death or discharge) were retrospectively enrolled. Demographic and clinical information were extracted from the medical records. Lung tissue sections from patients suffering from lung cancer were used for immunohistochemistry study of angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2) expression. BEAS-2B cell line was stimulated with various cytokines. RESULTS: In this cohort, 21 subjects (2.2%) had COPD and 22 (2.3%) had asthma. After adjusting for confounding factors, COPD patients had higher risk of developing severe illness (OR: 23.433; 95% CI 1.525-360.135; P < .01) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (OR: 19.762; 95% CI 1.461-267.369; P = .025) than asthmatics. COPD patients, particularly those with severe COVID-19, had lower counts of CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells and B cells and higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2 receptor, IL-10, IL-8, and IL-6 than asthmatics. COPD patients had increased, whereas asthmatics had decreased ACE2 protein expression in lower airways, compared with that in control subjects without asthma and COPD. IL-4 and IL-13 downregulated, but TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-17A upregulated ACE2 expression in BEAS-2B cells. CONCLUSION: Patients with asthma and COPD likely have different risk of severe COVID-19, which may be associated with different ACE2 expression.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 4792, 2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104550

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a public health emergency. Asthma does not represent a risk factor for COVID-19 in several published cohorts. We hypothesized that the SARS-CoV-2 proteome contains T cell epitopes, which are potentially cross-reactive to allergen epitopes. We aimed at identifying homologous peptide sequences by means of two distinct complementary bioinformatics approaches. Pipeline 1 included prediction of MHC Class I and Class II epitopes contained in the SARS-CoV-2 proteome and allergens along with alignment and elaborate ranking approaches. Pipeline 2 involved alignment of SARS-CoV-2 overlapping peptides with known allergen-derived T cell epitopes. Our results indicate a large number of MHC Class I epitope pairs including known as well as de novo predicted allergen T cell epitopes with high probability for cross-reactivity. Allergen sources, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Phleum pratense and Dermatophagoides species are of particular interest due to their association with multiple cross-reactive candidate peptides, independently of the applied bioinformatic approach. In contrast, peptides derived from food allergens, as well as MHC class II epitopes did not achieve high in silico ranking and were therefore not further investigated. Our findings warrant further experimental confirmation along with examination of the functional importance of such cross-reactive responses.


Subject(s)
Allergens/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Heterologous , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Asthma/immunology , Computational Biology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , HLA Antigens/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Viral Proteins/immunology
19.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep ; 21(2): 8, 2021 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070935

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has challenged healthcare system capacities and safety for health care workers, reshaping doctor-patient interaction favoring e-Health or telemedicine. The pandemic situation may make difficult to prioritize patients with allergies diseases (AD), face-to-face evaluation, and moreover concern about the possible COVID-19 diagnosis, since COVID-19 shared many symptoms in common with AD. Being COVID-19 a novel disease, everyone is susceptible; there are some advances on vaccine and specific treatment. We evaluate existing literature on allergic diseases (AD): allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, drug allergy, and skin allergy, and potential underlying mechanisms for any interrelationship between AD and COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: There is inconclusive and controversial evidence of the association between AD and the risk of adverse clinical outcomes of COVID-19. AD patients should minimize hospital and face-to-face visits, and those who have used biologics and allergen immunotherapy should continue the treatment. It is essential to wear personal protective equipment for the protection of health care workers. Social distancing, rational use of facemasks, eye protection, and hand disinfection for health care workers and patients deserve further attention and promotion. Teleconsultation during COVID-19 times for AD patients is very encouraging and telemedicine platform can provide a reliable service in patient care.


Subject(s)
Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Rhinitis, Allergic/therapy , Telemedicine , Asthma/immunology , Biological Products , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/immunology , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/therapy , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Desensitization, Immunologic , Disease Management , Disease Outbreaks , Drug Hypersensitivity/immunology , Drug Hypersensitivity/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Physical Distancing , Rhinitis, Allergic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol ; 21(3): 252-260, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066415

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma patients are typically at increased risk for severe outcomes from viral respiratory infections. However, asthma and atopy do not appear to be overrepresented comorbidities in COVID-19 patients, and hypotheses attempt to explain this observation. As COVID-19 continues to spread globally, it is imperative to understand how disease outcomes may be influenced in this population to guide patient care. RECENT FINDINGS: Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the principal host cell receptor for SARS-CoV-2 entry and Transmembrane Protease Serine 2 (TMRSS2) is the main priming protease. Models have linked atopic endotypes to reductions in ACE2 and increases in TMRSS2 on respiratory epithelia. Epidemiologic and experimental findings imply alterations in ACE2 expression correlate with clinical COVID-19 disease, but limitations restrict the ability to draw direct conclusions. SUMMARY: There is reasonable evidence to assert atopic endotypes modulate COVID-19 susceptibility, but it remains premature to classify this association as protective or deleterious. Asthma is a heterogeneous disease and epidemiologic studies should focus on investigating COVID-19 outcomes by underlying endotype. Direct experimental and clinical evidence is needed to draw definitive conclusions on how the complex interplay of ACE2 and TMRSS2 affect viral entry. VIDEO ABSTRACT: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9sfwqhz2h78sio3/AAB0JYd4MFzM5JjDFcYwz4CXa?dl=0.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Humans , Risk Factors , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology
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