Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 1076, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550352

ABSTRACT

Lysine-selective molecular tweezers are promising drug candidates against proteinopathies, viral infection, and bacterial biofilm. Despite demonstration of their efficacy in multiple cellular and animal models, important questions regarding their mechanism of action, including cell penetrance and intracellular distribution, have not been answered to date. The main impediment to answering these questions has been the low intrinsic fluorescence of the main compound tested to date, called CLR01. Here, we address these questions using new fluorescently labeled molecular tweezers derivatives. We show that these compounds are internalized in neurons and astrocytes, at least partially through dynamin-dependent endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate that the molecular tweezers concentrate rapidly in acidic compartments, primarily lysosomes. Accumulation of molecular tweezers in lysosomes may occur both through the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and via the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Moreover, by visualizing colocalization of molecular tweezers, lysosomes, and tau aggregates we show that lysosomes likely are the main site for the intracellular anti-amyloid activity of molecular tweezers. These findings have important implications for the mechanism of action of molecular tweezers in vivo, explaining how administration of low doses of the compounds achieves high effective concentrations where they are needed, and supporting the development of these compounds as drugs for currently cureless proteinopathies.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/metabolism , Bridged-Ring Compounds/metabolism , Endosomes/metabolism , Lysine/metabolism , Lysosomes/metabolism , Neurons/metabolism , Organophosphates/metabolism , Animals , Autophagy/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL
2.
Sovrem Tekhnologii Med ; 12(6): 98-108, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527052

ABSTRACT

The rapidly accumulating information about the new coronavirus infection and the ambiguous results obtained by various authors necessitate further research aiming at prevention and treatment of this disease. At the moment, there is convincing evidence that the pathogen affects not only the respiratory but also the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the study is to provide an insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the damage to the CNS caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Results: By analyzing the literature, we provide evidence that the brain is targeted by this virus. SARS-CoV-2 enters the body with the help of the target proteins: angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and associated serine protease TMPRSS2 of the nasal epithelium. Brain damage develops before the onset of pulmonary symptoms. The virus spreads through the brain tissue into the piriform cortex, basal ganglia, midbrain, and hypothalamus. Later, the substantia nigra of the midbrain, amygdala, hippocampus, and cerebellum become affected. Massive death of neurons, astrogliosis and activation of microglia develop at the next stage of the disease. By day 4, an excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines in the brain, local neuroinflammation, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and impaired neuroplasticity are detected. These changes imply the involvement of a vascular component driven by excessive activity of matrix metalloproteinases, mediated by CD147. The main players in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 in the brain are products of angiotensin II (AT II) metabolism, largely angiotensin 1-7 (AT 1-7) and angiotensin IV (AT IV). There are conflicting data regarding their role in damage to the CNS in various diseases, including the coronavirus infection.The second participant in the pathogenesis of brain damage in COVID-19 is CD147 - the inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases. This molecule is expressed on the endothelial cells of cerebral microvessels, as well as on leukocytes present in the brain during neuroinflammation. The CD147 molecule plays a significant role in maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the blood-brain barrier by controlling the basal membrane permeability and by mediating the astrocyte-endothelial interactions. Via the above mechanisms, an exposure to SARS-CoV-2 leads to direct damage to the neurovascular unit of the brain.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin I/metabolism , Angiotensin II/analogs & derivatives , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Basigin , Humans , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 652, 2021 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397868

ABSTRACT

Injury and loss of oligodendrocytes can cause demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. To improve our understanding of human oligodendrocyte development, which could facilitate development of remyelination-based treatment strategies, here we describe time-course single-cell-transcriptomic analysis of developing human stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte-lineage-cells (hOLLCs). The study includes hOLLCs derived from both genome engineered embryonic stem cell (ESC) reporter cells containing an Identification-and-Purification tag driven by the endogenous PDGFRα promoter and from unmodified induced pluripotent (iPS) cells. Our analysis uncovers substantial transcriptional heterogeneity of PDGFRα-lineage hOLLCs. We discover sub-populations of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (hOPCs) including a potential cytokine-responsive hOPC subset, and identify candidate regulatory genes/networks that define the identity of these sub-populations. Pseudotime trajectory analysis defines developmental pathways of oligodendrocytes vs astrocytes from PDGFRα-expressing hOPCs and predicts differentially expressed genes between the two lineages. In addition, pathway enrichment analysis followed by pharmacological intervention of these pathways confirm that mTOR and cholesterol biosynthesis signaling pathways are involved in maturation of oligodendrocytes from hOPCs.


Subject(s)
Genetic Heterogeneity , Genetic Variation , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Transcriptome/genetics , Astrocytes/cytology , Astrocytes/metabolism , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Line , Cell Lineage/genetics , Cholesterol/biosynthesis , Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology , Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism , Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells/cytology , Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha/genetics , Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha/metabolism , Signal Transduction/genetics , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
5.
J Neuroinflammation ; 18(1): 167, 2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological complications are common in patients affected by COVID-19 due to the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to infect brains. While the mechanisms of this process are not fully understood, it has been proposed that SARS-CoV-2 can infect the cells of the neurovascular unit (NVU), which form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of the current study was to analyze the expression pattern of the main SARS-CoV-2 receptors in naïve and HIV-1-infected cells of the NVU in order to elucidate a possible pathway of the virus entry into the brain and a potential modulatory impact of HIV-1 in this process. METHODS: The gene and protein expression profile of ACE2, TMPRSS2, ADAM17, BSG, DPP4, AGTR2, ANPEP, cathepsin B, and cathepsin L was assessed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunostaining, respectively. In addition, we investigated if brain endothelial cells can be affected by the exposure to the S1 subunit of the S protein, the domain responsible for the direct binding of SARS-CoV-2 to the ACE2 receptors. RESULTS: The receptors involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection are co-expressed in the cells of the NVU, especially in astrocytes and microglial cells. These receptors are functionally active as exposure of endothelial cells to the SARS CoV-2 S1 protein subunit altered the expression pattern of tight junction proteins, such as claudin-5 and ZO-1. Additionally, HIV-1 infection upregulated ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in brain astrocytes and microglia cells. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide key insight into SARS-CoV-2 recognition by cells of the NVU and may help to develop possible treatment of CNS complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Vessels/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/metabolism , HIV-1 , Neurons/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Astrocytes/metabolism , Brain Diseases/etiology , Cells, Cultured , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Humans , Microglia/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Primary Cell Culture , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2 , Virus Replication
6.
EBioMedicine ; 70: 103512, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330766

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurologic manifestations are well-recognized features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the longitudinal association of biomarkers reflecting CNS impact and neurological symptoms is not known. We sought to determine whether plasma biomarkers of CNS injury were associated with neurologic sequelae after COVID-19. METHODS: Patients with confirmed acute COVID-19 were studied prospectively. Neurological symptoms were recorded during the acute phase of the disease and at six months follow-up, and blood samples were collected longitudinally. Healthy age-matched individuals were included as controls. We analysed plasma concentrations of neurofilament light-chain (NfL), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAp), and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15). FINDINGS: One hundred patients with mild (n = 24), moderate (n = 28), and severe (n = 48) COVID-19 were followed for a median (IQR) of 225 (187-262) days. In the acute phase, patients with severe COVID-19 had higher concentrations of NfL than all other groups (all p < 0·001), and higher GFAp than controls (p < 0·001). GFAp was also significantly increased in moderate disease (p < 0·05) compared with controls. NfL (r = 0·53, p < 0·001) and GFAp (r = 0·39, p < 0·001) correlated with GDF-15 during the acute phase. After six months, NfL and GFAp concentrations had normalized, with no persisting group differences. Despite this, 50 patients reported persistent neurological symptoms, most commonly fatigue (n = 40), "brain-fog" (n = 29), and changes in cognition (n = 25). We found no correlation between persistent neurological symptoms and CNS injury biomarkers in the acute phase. INTERPRETATION: The normalization of CNS injury biomarkers in all individuals, regardless of previous disease severity or persisting neurological symptoms, indicates that post COVID-19 neurological sequelae are not accompanied by ongoing CNS injury. FUNDING: The Swedish State Support for Clinical Research, SciLifeLab Sweden, and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation have provided funding for this project.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/pathology , Astrocytes/virology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aged , Astrocytes/metabolism , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein/metabolism , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Neurofilament Proteins/metabolism , Neurons/metabolism , Neurons/pathology , Neurons/virology , Sweden
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3847, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242037

ABSTRACT

Ruxolitinib is the first janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibitor that was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agency for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The drug targets the JAK/STAT signalling pathway, which is critical in regulating the gliogenesis process during nervous system development. In the study, we assessed the effect of non-maternal toxic dosages of ruxolitinib (0-30 mg/kg/day between E7.5-E20.5) on the brain of the developing mouse embryos. While the pregnant mice did not show any apparent adverse effects, the Gfap protein marker for glial cells and S100ß mRNA marker for astrocytes were reduced in the postnatal day (P) 1.5 pups' brains. Gfap expression and Gfap+ cells were also suppressed in the differentiating neurospheres culture treated with ruxolitinib. Compared to the control group, adult mice treated with ruxolitinib prenatally showed no changes in motor coordination, locomotor function, and recognition memory. However, increased explorative behaviour within an open field and improved spatial learning and long-term memory retention were observed in the treated group. We demonstrated transplacental effects of ruxolitinib on astrogenesis, suggesting the potential use of ruxolitinib to revert pathological conditions caused by gliogenic-shift in early brain development such as Down and Noonan syndromes.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/drug effects , Learning/drug effects , Maternal Exposure , Memory/drug effects , Neurogenesis/drug effects , Nitriles/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Age Factors , Animals , Astrocytes/metabolism , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Biomarkers , Female , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Male , Maternal Exposure/adverse effects , Mice , Neurogenesis/genetics , Nitriles/adverse effects , Organ Specificity/drug effects , Pregnancy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects
8.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 169, 2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199270

ABSTRACT

Neurological manifestations are frequently reported in the COVID-19 patients. Neuromechanism of SARS-CoV-2 remains to be elucidated. In this study, we explored the mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 neurotropism via our established non-human primate model of COVID-19. In rhesus monkey, SARS-CoV-2 invades the CNS primarily via the olfactory bulb. Thereafter, viruses rapidly spread to functional areas of the central nervous system, such as hippocampus, thalamus, and medulla oblongata. The infection of SARS-CoV-2 induces the inflammation possibly by targeting neurons, microglia, and astrocytes in the CNS. Consistently, SARS-CoV-2 infects neuro-derived SK-N-SH, glial-derived U251, and brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence of SARS-CoV-2 neuroinvasion in the NHP model, which provides important insights into the CNS-related pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Olfactory Bulb/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Astrocytes/metabolism , Astrocytes/pathology , Astrocytes/virology , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , Brain Diseases/pathology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Microglia/metabolism , Microglia/pathology , Microglia/virology , Neurons/metabolism , Neurons/pathology , Neurons/virology , Olfactory Bulb/pathology , Olfactory Bulb/virology
9.
Brain Behav Immun ; 91: 740-755, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064860

ABSTRACT

Central nervous system (CNS) innate immunity plays essential roles in infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and brain or spinal cord injuries. Astrocytes and microglia are the principal cells that mediate innate immunity in the CNS. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), expressed by astrocytes and microglia, sense pathogen-derived or endogenous ligands released by damaged cells and initiate the innate immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a well-characterized family of PRRs. The contribution of microglial TLR signaling to CNS pathology has been extensively investigated. Even though astrocytes assume a wide variety of key functions, information about the role of astroglial TLRs in CNS disease and injuries is limited. Because astrocytes display heterogeneity and exhibit phenotypic plasticity depending on the effectors present in the local milieu, they can exert both detrimental and beneficial effects. TLRs are modulators of these paradoxical astroglial properties. The goal of the current review is to highlight the essential roles played by astroglial TLRs in CNS infections, injuries and diseases. We discuss the contribution of astroglial TLRs to host defense as well as the dissemination of viral and bacterial infections in the CNS. We examine the link between astroglial TLRs and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and present evidence showing the pivotal influence of astroglial TLR signaling on sterile inflammation in CNS injury. Finally, we define the research questions and areas that warrant further investigations in the context of astrocytes, TLRs, and CNS dysfunction.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/physiopathology , Toll-Like Receptors/physiology , Animals , Astrocytes/physiology , Brain/metabolism , Central Nervous System/immunology , Central Nervous System/metabolism , Central Nervous System Diseases/immunology , Central Nervous System Infections/pathology , Encephalitis/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Microglia/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/metabolism , Neurons/metabolism , Receptors, Pattern Recognition/immunology , Signal Transduction , Spinal Cord/pathology , Spinal Cord Injuries/pathology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
11.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 4746, 2020 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740043

ABSTRACT

Ginkgolic acids (GA) are alkylphenol constituents of the leaves and fruits of Ginkgo biloba. GA has shown pleiotropic effects in vitro, including: antitumor effects through inhibition of lipogenesis; decreased expression of invasion associated proteins through AMPK activation; and potential rescue of amyloid-ß (Aß) induced synaptic impairment. GA was also reported to have activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Several mechanisms for this activity have been suggested including: SUMOylation inhibition; blocking formation of the E1-SUMO intermediate; inhibition of fatty acid synthase; non-specific SIRT inhibition; and activation of protein phosphatase type-2C. Here we report that GA inhibits Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by inhibition of both fusion and viral protein synthesis. Additionally, we report that GA inhibits human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome replication and Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of normal human astrocytes (NHA). We show a broad spectrum of fusion inhibition by GA of all three classes of fusion proteins including HIV, Ebola virus (EBOV), influenza A virus (IAV) and Epstein Barr virus (EBV). In addition, we show inhibition of a non-enveloped adenovirus. Our experiments suggest that GA inhibits virion entry by blocking the initial fusion event. Data showing inhibition of HSV-1 and CMV replication, when GA is administered post-infection, suggest a possible secondary mechanism targeting protein and DNA synthesis. Thus, in light of the strong effect of GA on viral infection, even after the infection begins, it may potentially be used to treat acute infections (e.g. Coronavirus, EBOV, ZIKV, IAV and measles), and also topically for the successful treatment of active lesions (e.g. HSV-1, HSV-2 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV)).


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , DNA Virus Infections/metabolism , DNA Viruses/drug effects , RNA Virus Infections/metabolism , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Salicylates/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Fusion Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Astrocytes/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , DNA Replication/drug effects , DNA Virus Infections/virology , DNA Viruses/genetics , DNA, Viral/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , RNA Virus Infections/virology , RNA Viruses/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Envelope Proteins/biosynthesis , Viral Fusion Proteins/biosynthesis , Virion/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
13.
Neurology ; 95(12): e1754-e1759, 2020 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601304

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has an impact on the CNS by measuring plasma biomarkers of CNS injury. METHODS: We recruited 47 patients with mild (n = 20), moderate (n = 9), or severe (n = 18) COVID-19 and measured 2 plasma biomarkers of CNS injury by single molecule array, neurofilament light chain protein (NfL; a marker of intra-axonal neuronal injury) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAp; a marker of astrocytic activation/injury), in samples collected at presentation and again in a subset after a mean of 11.4 days. Cross-sectional results were compared with results from 33 age-matched controls derived from an independent cohort. RESULTS: The patients with severe COVID-19 had higher plasma concentrations of GFAp (p = 0.001) and NfL (p < 0.001) than controls, while GFAp was also increased in patients with moderate disease (p = 0.03). In patients with severe disease, an early peak in plasma GFAp decreased on follow-up (p < 0.01), while NfL showed a sustained increase from first to last follow-up (p < 0.01), perhaps reflecting a sequence of early astrocytic response and more delayed axonal injury. CONCLUSION: We show neurochemical evidence of neuronal injury and glial activation in patients with moderate and severe COVID-19. Further studies are needed to clarify the frequency and nature of COVID-19-related CNS damage and its relation to both clinically defined CNS events such as hypoxic and ischemic events and mechanisms more closely linked to systemic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection and consequent immune activation, as well as to evaluate the clinical utility of monitoring plasma NfL and GFAp in the management of this group of patients.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein/blood , Neurofilament Proteins/blood , Neurons/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Single Molecule Imaging
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL