Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 85
Filter
1.
Neurologia ; 35(6): 357-362, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680554

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic is changing approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and care provision in multiple sclerosis (MS). During both the initial and peak phases of the epidemic, the administration of disease-modifying drugs, typically immunosuppressants administered in pulses, was suspended due to the uncertainty about their impact on SARS-CoV-2 infection, mainly in contagious asymptomatic/presymptomatic patients. The purpose of this study is to present a safety algorithm enabling patients to resume pulse immunosuppressive therapy (PIT) during the easing of lockdown measures. METHODS: We developed a safety algorithm based on our clinical experience with MS and the available published evidence; the algorithm assists in the detection of contagious asymptomatic/presymptomatic cases and of patients with mild symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection with a view to withdrawing PIT in these patients and preventing new infections at day hospitals. RESULTS: We developed a clinical/microbiological screening algorithm consisting of a symptom checklist, applied during a teleconsultation 48hours before the scheduled session of PIT, and PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 in nasopharyngeal exudate 24hours before the procedure. CONCLUSION: The application of our safety algorithm presents a favourable risk-benefit ratio despite the fact that the actual proportion of asymptomatic and presymptomatic individuals is unknown. Systematic PCR testing, which provides the highest sensitivity for detecting presymptomatic cases, combined with early detection of symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection may reduce infections and improve detection of high-risk patients before they receive PIT.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care , Asymptomatic Diseases , Checklist , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Contraindications, Drug , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Mass Screening/methods , Nasopharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Pulse Therapy, Drug , Quarantine , Risk Assessment , Symptom Assessment , Telemedicine
2.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(7)2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-659487

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of conducting three versus two reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) tests for diagnosing and discharging people with COVID-19 with regard to public health and clinical impacts by incorporating asymptomatic and presymptomatic infection and to compare the medical costs associated with the two strategies. METHODS: A model that consisted of six compartments was built. The compartments were the susceptible (S), the asymptomatic infective (A), the presymptomatic infective (L), the symptomatic infective (I), the recovered (R), and the deceased (D). The A, L and I classes were infective states. To construct the model, several parameters were set as fixed using existing evidence and the rest of the parameters were estimated by fitting the model to a smoothed curve of the cumulative confirmed cases in Wuhan from 24 January 2020 to 6 March 2020. Input data about the cost-effectiveness analysis were retrieved from the literature. RESULTS: Conducting RT-PCR tests three times for diagnosing and discharging people with COVID-19 reduced the estimated total number of symptomatic cases to 45| 013 from 51 144 in the two-test strategy over 43 days. The former strategy also led to 850.1 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of health gain and a net healthcare expenditure saving of CN¥49.1 million. About 100.7 QALYs of the health gain were attributable to quality-adjusted life day difference between the strategies during the analytic period and 749.4 QALYs were attributable to years of life saved. CONCLUSIONS: More accurate strategies and methods of testing for the control of COVID-19 may reduce both the number of infections and the total medical costs. Increasing the number of tests should be considered in regions with relatively severe epidemics when existing tests have moderate sensitivity.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/economics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
3.
Elife ; 92020 06 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607959

ABSTRACT

Previously, we showed that 3% (31/1032)of asymptomatic healthcare workers (HCWs) from a large teaching hospital in Cambridge, UK, tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in April 2020. About 15% (26/169) HCWs with symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (Rivett et al., 2020). Here, we show that the proportion of both asymptomatic and symptomatic HCWs testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 rapidly declined to near-zero between 25th April and 24th May 2020, corresponding to a decline in patient admissions with COVID-19 during the ongoing UK 'lockdown'. These data demonstrate how infection prevention and control measures including staff testing may help prevent hospitals from becoming independent 'hubs' of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, and illustrate how, with appropriate precautions, organizations in other sectors may be able to resume on-site work safely.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Personnel , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Community-Acquired Infections/transmission , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , England/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Female , Hospital Units , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Prevalence , Program Evaluation , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Symptom Assessment
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e19938, 2020 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: South Korea took preemptive action against coronavirus disease (COVID-19) by implementing extensive testing, thorough epidemiological investigation, strict social distancing, and rapid treatment of patients according to disease severity. The Korean government entrusted large-scale hospitals with the operation of living and treatment support centers (LTSCs) for the management for clinically healthy COVID-19 patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to introduce our experience implementing information and communications technology (ICT)-based remote patient management systems at a COVID-19 LTSC. METHODS: We adopted new electronic health record templates, hospital information system (HIS) dashboards, cloud-based medical image sharing, a mobile app, and smart vital sign monitoring devices. RESULTS: Enhancements were made to the HIS to assist in the workflow and care of patients in the LTSC. A dashboard was created for the medical staff to view the vital signs and symptoms of all patients. Patients used a mobile app to consult with their physician or nurse, answer questionnaires, and input self-measured vital signs; the results were uploaded to the hospital information system in real time. Cloud-based image sharing enabled interoperability between medical institutions. Korea's strategy of aggressive mitigation has "flattened the curve" of the rate of infection. A multidisciplinary approach was integral to develop systems supporting patient care and management at the living and treatment support center as quickly as possible. CONCLUSIONS: Faced with a novel infectious disease, we describe the implementation and experience of applying an ICT-based patient management system in the LTSC affiliated with Seoul National University Hospital. ICT-based tools and applications are increasingly important in health care, and we hope that our experience will provide insight into future technology-based infectious disease responses.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Information Technology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Male , Mobile Applications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Telemedicine
7.
Diagn Interv Imaging ; 101(7-8): 457-461, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592475

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and imaging characteristics of incidentally diagnosed COVID-19 pneumonia on computed tomography (CT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted between March 20th and March 31st, 2020 at Cochin hospital, Paris France. Thoracic CT examinations of all patients referred for another reason than a suspicion of SARS-CoV-2 infection were reviewed. CT images were analyzed by a chest radiologist to confirm the presence of findings consistent with COVID-19 pneumonia and quantify disease extent. Clinical and biological data (C-reactive protein serum level [CRP] and white blood cell count) of patients with CT findings suggestive for COVID-19 pneumonia were retrieved from the electronic medical chart. RESULTS: During the study period, among 205 diagnostic CT examinations, six examinations (6/205, 3%) in 6 different patients (4 men, 2 women; median age, 57 years) revealed images highly suggestive of COVID-19 pneumonia. The final diagnosis was confirmed by RT-PCR. Three inpatients were suspected of extra thoracic infection whereas three outpatients were either fully asymptomatic or presented with fatigue only. All had increased CRP serum level and lymphopenia. Disease extent on CT was mild to moderate in 5/6 patients (83%) and severe in 1/6 patient (17%). CONCLUSION: Cumulative incidence of fortuitous diagnosis if COVID-19 pneumonia did not exceed 3% during the highest pandemic phase and was predominantly associated with limited lung involvement.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Incidental Findings , Multidetector Computed Tomography , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiography, Thoracic , Adult , Aged, 80 and over , Asymptomatic Diseases , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
8.
Immunol Res ; 68(3): 161-168, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592322

ABSTRACT

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on our lives and has rapidly expanded to reach more than 4 million cases worldwide by May 2020. These cases are characterized by extreme variability, from a mild or asymptomatic form lasting for a few days up to severe forms of interstitial pneumonia that may require ventilatory therapy and can lead to patient death.Several hypotheses have been drawn up to understand the role of the interaction between the infectious agent and the immune system in the development of the disease and the most severe forms; the role of the cytokine storm seems important.Innate immunity, as one of the first elements of guest interaction with different infectious agents, could play an important role in the development of the cytokine storm and be responsible for boosting more severe forms. Therefore, it seems important to study also this important arm of the immune system to adequately understand the pathogenesis of the disease. Research on this topic is also needed to develop therapeutic strategies for treatment of this disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Immunity, Innate , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Severity of Illness Index
9.
Cell Death Dis ; 11(6): 438, 2020 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591593

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Since its first report in December 2019, despite great efforts made in almost every country worldwide, this disease continues to spread globally, especially in most parts of Europe, Iran, and the United States. Here, we update the recent understanding in clinical characteristics, diagnosis strategies, as well as clinical management of COVID-19 in China as compared to Italy, with the purpose to integrate the China experience with the global efforts to outline references for prevention, basic research, treatment as well as final control of the disease. Being the first two countries we feel appropriate to evaluate the evolution of the disease as well as the early result of the treatment, in order to offer a different baseline to other countries. It is also interesting to compare two countries, with a very significant difference in population, where the morbidity and mortality has been so different, and unrelated to the size of the country.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Asymptomatic Diseases , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Young Adult
10.
In Vivo ; 34(3 Suppl): 1681-1684, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-539714

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe the incidental detection of COVID-19 disease on positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in a patient with cancer despite initial negative swab by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CASE REPORT: Clinical and radiographic data were obtained from the electronic medical record. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained and evaluated for COVID-19 by the Food and Drug Administration-approved reverse transcription-PCR assays. On radiographic examination, PET/CT was consistent with COVID-19-related pneumonia not seen on prior imaging. Initial nasopharyngeal swab 2 days after PET/CT imaging was negative for COVID-19. Subsequent repeat swab 10 days later was positive for COVID-19, while the patient was febrile on screening assessment. The patient remained COVID-19-positive until 1 month after abnormal PET/CT imaging. CONCLUSION: PET/CT can be sensitive for early COVID-19 detection, even in the setting of a negative confirmatory PCR test. This highlights the importance of continued patient surveillance and use of appropriate personal protective equipment to minimize COVID-19 transmission.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnostic imaging , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Tonsillar Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/complications , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , False Negative Reactions , Humans , Incidental Findings , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , New York City , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Protective Devices , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tonsillar Neoplasms/complications
13.
Int J Surg ; 79: 120-124, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-412451

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused great public concern worldwide due to its high rates of infectivity and pathogenicity. The Chinese government responded in a timely manner, alleviated the dilemma, achieved a huge victory and lockdown has now been lifted in Wuhan. However, the outbreak has occurred in more than 200 other countries. Globally, as of 9:56 am CEST on 19 May 2020, there have been 4,696,849 confirmed cases of COVID-19, including 315,131 deaths, reported to Word Health Organization (WHO). The spread of COVID-19 overwhelmed the healthcare systems of many countries and even crashed the fragile healthcare systems of some. Although the situation in each country is different, health workers play a critical role in the fight against COVID-19. In this review, we highlight the status of health worker infections in China and other countries, especially the causes of infection in China and the standardised protocol to protect health workers from the perspective of an anaesthesiologist, in the hope of providing references to reduce medical infections and contain the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
14.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(8): 1924-1926, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-378186

ABSTRACT

We explored the secondary attack rate in different types of contact with persons presymptomatic for coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Close contacts who lived with or had frequent contact with an index case-patient had a higher risk for COVID-19. Our findings provide population-based evidence for transmission from persons with presymptomatic COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asymptomatic Diseases , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
15.
Epidemics ; 31: 100392, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-349772

ABSTRACT

The role of asymptomatic carriers in transmission poses challenges for control of the COVID-19 pandemic. Study of asymptomatic transmission and implications for surveillance and disease burden are ongoing, but there has been little study of the implications of asymptomatic transmission on dynamics of disease. We use a mathematical framework to evaluate expected effects of asymptomatic transmission on the basic reproduction number R0 (i.e., the expected number of secondary cases generated by an average primary case in a fully susceptible population) and the fraction of new secondary cases attributable to asymptomatic individuals. If the generation-interval distribution of asymptomatic transmission differs from that of symptomatic transmission, then estimates of the basic reproduction number which do not explicitly account for asymptomatic cases may be systematically biased. Specifically, if asymptomatic cases have a shorter generation interval than symptomatic cases, R0 will be over-estimated, and if they have a longer generation interval, R0 will be under-estimated. Estimates of the realized proportion of asymptomatic transmission during the exponential phase also depend on asymptomatic generation intervals. Our analysis shows that understanding the temporal course of asymptomatic transmission can be important for assessing the importance of this route of transmission, and for disease dynamics. This provides an additional motivation for investigating both the importance and relative duration of asymptomatic transmission.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Diseases , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Epidemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Basic Reproduction Number , Humans , Pandemics
18.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(2): 145-151, 2020 Feb 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-275635

ABSTRACT

Objective: An outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus diseases (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China has spread quickly nationwide. Here, we report results of a descriptive, exploratory analysis of all cases diagnosed as of February 11, 2020. Methods: All COVID-19 cases reported through February 11, 2020 were extracted from China's Infectious Disease Information System. Analyses included: 1) summary of patient characteristics; 2) examination of age distributions and sex ratios; 3) calculation of case fatality and mortality rates; 4) geo-temporal analysis of viral spread; 5) epidemiological curve construction; and 6) subgroup analysis. Results: A total of 72 314 patient records-44 672 (61.8%) confirmed cases, 16 186 (22.4%) suspected cases, 10567 (14.6%) clinical diagnosed cases (Hubei only), and 889 asymptomatic cases (1.2%)-contributed data for the analysis. Among confirmed cases, most were aged 30-79 years (86.6%), diagnosed in Hubei (74.7%), and considered mild/mild pneumonia (80.9%). A total of 1 023 deaths occurred among confirmed cases for an overall case-fatality rate of 2.3%. The COVID-19 spread outward from Hubei sometime after December 2019 and by February 11, 2020, 1 386 counties across all 31 provinces were affected. The epidemic curve of onset of symptoms peaked in January 23-26, then began to decline leading up to February 11. A total of 1 716 health workers have become infected and 5 have died (0.3%). Conclusions: The COVID-19 epidemic has spread very quickly. It only took 30 days to expand from Hubei to the rest of Mainland China. With many people returning from a long holiday, China needs to prepare for the possible rebound of the epidemic.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus , Mortality , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality
19.
Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol ; 95(6): 300-310, 2020 Jun.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-271052

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Minimize exposure to the SARS-CoV-2, reduce the chances of cross-transmission between patients and healthcare personnel, and prevent the development of postoperative complications from the management of patients with eye diseases during the 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic (COVID-19). METHODS: COVID-19 literature review and consensus establishment between different Spanish ophthalmology societies in order to provide guidelines and recommendations of maximum resources primarily conditioned by the state of alert, confinement and social distancing that occurs in Spain since March 16, 2020. RESULTS: The recommendations will promote the adoption of action and protection measures for eye care in outpatient clinics, surgical areas and hospitalization, for unconfirmed (asymptomatic and symptomatic) and confirmed COVID-19 patients. Measures must be adapted to the circumstances and availability of personal protective equipment in each of the centers and Autonomous Communities, which will be updated according to the pandemic phases and the measures adopted by the Spanish Government. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, attention to the potential health risks to the population caused by coronavirus should prevail over the possible progression of the common eye diseases. Ophthalmologists and other eye care professionals must assume a possible progression of these diseases due to the impossibility of adequate patient follow-up.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Asymptomatic Diseases , Blood Safety , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Contact Lenses , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Progression , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Ophthalmology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Factors , Societies, Medical , Spain , Symptom Assessment/methods , Withholding Treatment
20.
MMW Fortschr Med ; 162(9): 64-67, 2020 May.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-262461

ABSTRACT

On Mar 11th, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) stated in its Situation Report - 51 Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a pandemic. In early April 2020, a teaching hospital underwent shutdown and quarantine due to an outbreak of infection in accordance with Section 6 of the Infection Protection Act (index patient and 5 infected nursing staff). The complete staff (physicians, nurses and nonmedical personnel [NMP]) underwent COVID-19 testing within two phases: (1) between Apr 3rd and 5th, 2020 [n=1170], followed by (2) between Apr 8th and 9th, 2020 [n=953] with COVID-19 silent carrier positivity rates in accordance to testing phases of (1) n=19 (1.6%) and (2) n=25 (2.6%). The cumulative infection rate for NMP (1.6%), doctors (3.8%) and nurses (9.7%) was connected to type and extent of COVID-19 patient contact. Despite COVID-19 positivity of 34.8% (46 of 132 beds), a risk-free management of hospital operation is possible to a certain extent if hygiene regulations and strict patient selection are followed. However, a COVID-19-free clinic cannot be expected due to silent carriers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Hospitals, Teaching , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL