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1.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 153(1): 86-87.e2, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With many states in the United States permitting dentists to administer the COVID-19 vaccine, there is much discussion about their scope of practice in relation to delivering other vaccines. METHODS: Survey questions were developed to assess dentists' awareness about their vaccine administration scope of practice and attitudes and barriers if choosing to incorporate vaccine delivery into their practice scope. The survey was deployed electronically to members of the American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel (N = 989) on September 2, 2021, and remained open for 2 weeks. Data were summarized descriptively in Qualtrics and SAS Version 9.4. RESULTS: Of the 330 ACE Panel members who responded to the survey, 42% were not aware of which vaccines their state permits them to deliver. More than one-half (55%) would be willing to administer influenza or COVID-19 vaccines in their practice setting, but at present only 2% of respondents administer vaccines. To overcome vaccine administration barriers, the top 3 resources respondents want access to are the following: training or education, financial support, and access to protocols. Of all the respondents, 91% indicated the dental hygienist should be involved in certain capacities. CONCLUSIONS: Few dentists are administering vaccines, possibly owing to a number of challenges. Dental hygienists may play an integral role in the administration of vaccines in the dental clinic, but few dentists are educating their patients about vaccines. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Although dentists wishing to administer vaccines in their practice may encounter barriers, support at the state, federal, and organizational levels could help them overcome these challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , American Dental Association , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Vaccines , Dental Hygienists , Dentists , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 Dec 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580818

ABSTRACT

The healthcare policy changes need to be updated for better management of the COVID-19 outbreak; hence, there is an urgent need to understand the knowledge and preparedness of healthcare workers regarding the infection control COVID-19. Therefore, the present study aims to assess the knowledge and preparedness towards COVID-19 among dentists, undergraduate, and postgraduates in dental universities one year after the COVID-19 outbreak. The multi-centric cross-sectional study was conducted by evaluating 395 structured, pre-coded, and validated questionnaires obtained from sample units comprising full-time dental students (undergraduates, interns, and postgraduates) and dentists who were currently in practice and who were able to comprehend the languages English or Arabic. The first part of the questionnaire included questions related to demographic characteristics. The second part of the survey consisted of questions that address knowledge concerning COVID-19. The third part of the survey addressed questions based on the preparedness to fight against COVID-19 including sharp injuries during this period. Comparing the knowledge scores of dentists, dental undergraduates, and postgraduates using the ANOVA test, dentists have higher knowledge and preparedness scores than postgraduates and undergraduates (p-value < 0.05). Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that undergraduates and postgraduates were 2.567 and 1.352 times less aware of the personal protective measures against COVID-19 than dentists, respectively. Dentists had the comparatively better perception in knowledge and awareness of COVID-19 than undergraduates and postgraduates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 23-28, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic forced cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs to rapidly shift from in-person care delivery to telehealth. Our objective was to provide a qualitative exploration of facilitators and barriers to: 1) implementing high-quality telehealth and 2) navigating reimbursement for telehealth services. METHODS: We used data from the 2020 State of Care CF Program Survey (n=286 U.S. care programs) administered in August-September to identify two cohorts of programs, with variation in telehealth quality (n=12 programs) and reimbursement (n=8 programs). We conducted focus groups and semi-structured interviews with CF program directors and coordinators in December 2020, approximately 9 months from onset of the pandemic. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to identify facilitators and barriers of implementation, and inductive thematic analysis to identify facilitators and barriers of reimbursement. RESULTS: Factors differentiating programs with greater and lower perceived telehealth quality included telehealth characteristics (perceived advantage over in-person care, cost, platform quality); external influences (needs and resources of those served by the CF program), characteristics of the CF program (compatibility with workflows, relative priority, available resources); characteristics of team members (individual stage of change), and processes for implementation (engaging patients and teams). Reimbursement barriers included documentation to optimize billing; reimbursement of multi-disciplinary team members, remote monitoring, and telephone-only telehealth; and lower volume of patients. CONCLUSIONS: A number of factors are associated with successful implementation and reimbursement of telehealth. Future efforts should provide guidance and incentives that support telehealth delivery and infrastructure, share best practices across CF programs, and remove barriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Participation , Telemedicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Needs Assessment , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Qualitative Research , Quality Improvement , Reimbursement Mechanisms , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
6.
J Prim Health Care ; 13(4): 340-350, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585643

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown in New Zealand in March 2020, there was a rapid shift to virtual consultations in primary care. This change was supported by system adjustments to enable electronic transmission of prescriptions without a handwritten signature if they met certain security criteria. International research suggests potential for unintended consequences with such changes, so it is important to understand the effect on professional practice in New Zealand general practice and community pharmacy. AIM The purpose of this study was to undertake a preliminary exploration of the experiences of New Zealand general practitioners and community pharmacists when prescriptions are transmitted electronically directly from prescriber to pharmacy. METHODS Semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of four pharmacists and four general practitioners gathered qualitative data about their experiences of the shift to electronic transmission of prescriptions. Participants' perceptions of effect on professional workflow, interprofessional interactions between general practitioners and pharmacists, and interactions with patients were explored. Interviews were audio-recorded, and the data analysed thematically using an inductive approach. RESULTS Four themes were identified: workflow transformation; mixed impact on interactions with patients; juggling timing and expectations; and new avenues for interprofessional communication (with some cul-de-sacs). DISCUSSION Both general practitioners and pharmacists experienced transformational changes to workflow. This was positive for general practitioners due to saved time and increased work flexibility. Pharmacists noted potential benefits but also some challenges. To fully reap teamwork benefits, more work is needed on managing the timing issues and patient expectations, and to refine the new modes of communication between health-care practitioners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Pharmacy Services , Electronic Prescribing , Attitude of Health Personnel , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pharmacists , Primary Health Care , Professional Role , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
7.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248627, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575736

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been a rapid increase in the number of cases of COVID-19 in Latin America, Africa, Asia and many countries that have an insufficient number of physicians and other health care personnel, and the need for the inclusion of medical students on health teams is a very important issue. It has been recommended that medical students work as volunteers, undergo appropriate training, not undertake any activity beyond their level of competence, and receive continuous supervision and adequate personal protective equipment. However, the motivation of medical students must be evaluated to make volunteering a more evidence-based initiative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the motivation of medical students to be part of health teams to aid in the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed a questionnaire specifically to evaluate medical students' perceptions about participating in the care of patients with suspected infection with coronavirus during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire had two parts: a) one part with questions on individual characteristics, year in medical school and geographic location of the medical school and b) a second part with twenty-eight statements assessed on a 5-point Likert scale (totally agree, agree, neither agree nor disagree, disagree and totally disagree). To develop the questionnaire, we performed consensus meetings with a group of faculty and medical students. The questionnaire was sent to student organizations of 257 medical schools in Brazil and answered by 10,433 students. We used multinomial logistic regression models to analyze the data. Statements associated with greater odds ratios for participation of medical students in the COVID-19 pandemic were related to a sense of purpose or duty ("It is the duty of the medical student to put himself or herself at the service of the population in the pandemic"), altruism ("I am willing to take risks by participating in practice in the context of the pandemic"), and perception of good performance and professional identity ("I will be a better health professional for having experienced the pandemic"). Males were more prone than females to believe that only interns should participate in the care of patients with COVID-19 (odds ratio 1.36 [coefficient interval 95%:1.24-1.49]) and that all students should participate (OR 1.68 [CI:1.4-1.91]). CONCLUSIONS: Medical students are more motivated by a sense of purpose or duty, altruism, perception of good performance and values of professionalism than by their interest in learning. These results have implications for the development of volunteering programs and the design of health force policies in the present pandemic and in future health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Schools, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Motivation/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1892017, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575053

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telesimulation may allow simulationists to continue with essential simulation-based training programs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, we investigated the feasibility of telesimulation for neonatal resuscitation training, assessed participants' attitudes towards telesimulation as well as its effect on neonatal resuscitation knowledge, and compared results between medical students and neonatal nurses. Methods: For this prospective observational pilot study, medical students and neonatal nursing staff were recruited on a voluntary basis. Pre- and post-training knowledge was assessed using a 20-question questionnaire. Following the educational intervention, participants further answered a six-item questionnaire on their perception of telesimulation. For the telesimulation session, participants received a simulation package including a low-fidelity mannequin and medical equipment. The one-hour telesimulation session was delivered by an experienced instructor and broadcasted via Cisco Webex for groups of 2-3 participants, covering all elements of the neonatal resuscitation algorithm and including deliberate technical skills practice. Results: Nine medical students and nine neonatal nurses participated in a total of seven telesimulation sessions. In general, participants enjoyed the telesimulation session, acknowledged a positive learning effect and found telesimulation suitable for neonatal resuscitation training, but were critical of potential technical issues, training logistics, and the quality of supervision and feedback. Neonatal resuscitation knowledge scores increased significantly after the educational intervention both for medical students and nurses. Conclusions: Telesimulation is feasible for neonatal resuscitation training and associated with significant improvements in knowledge of current resuscitation guidelines, without differences between medical students and neonatal nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Resuscitation/education , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e23441, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In April 2020, two independent clinical trials to assess SARS-CoV-2 prophylaxis strategies among health care workers were initiated at our hospital: MeCOVID (melatonin vs placebo) and EPICOS (tenofovir disoproxil/emtricitabine vs hydroxychloroquine vs combination therapy vs placebo). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the reasons why health care workers chose to participate in the MeCOVID and EPICOS trials, as well as why they chose one over the other. METHODS: Both trials were offered to health care workers through an internal news bulletin. After an initial screening visit, all subjects were asked to respond to a web-based survey. RESULTS: In the first month, 206 health care workers were screened and 160 were randomized. The survey participation was high at 73.3%. Health care workers cited "to contribute to scientific knowledge" (n=80, 53.0%), followed by "to avoid SARS-CoV-2 infection" (n=33, 21.9%) and "the interest to be tested for SARS-CoV-2" (n=28, 18.5%), as their primary reasons to participate in the trials. We observed significant differences in the expected personal benefits across physicians and nurses (P=.01). The vast majority of volunteers (n=202, 98.0%) selected the MeCOVID trial, their primary reason being their concern regarding adverse reactions to treatments in the EPICOS trial (n=102, 69.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Health care workers' reasons to participate in prophylaxis trials in an acute pandemic context appear to be driven largely by their desire to contribute to science and to gain health benefits. Safety outweighed efficacy when choosing between the two clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248387, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573672

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study aims to investigate GPs' experiences of how UK COVID-19 policies have affected the management and safety of complex elderly patients, who suffer from multimorbidity, at the primary care level in North West London (NWL). DESIGN: This is a service evaluation adopting a qualitative approach. SETTING: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted between 6 and 22 May 2020, 2 months after the introduction of the UK COVID-19 Action Plan, allowing GPs to adapt to the new changes and reflect on their impact. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen GPs working in NWL were interviewed, until data saturation was reached. OUTCOME MEASURES: The impact of COVID-19 policies on the management and safety of complex elderly patients in primary care from the GPs' perspective. RESULTS: Participants' average experience was fourteen years working in primary care for the NHS. They stated that COVID-19 policies have affected primary care at three levels, patients' behaviour, work conditions, and clinical practice. GPs reflected on the impact through five major themes; four of which have been adapted from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) framework, changes in primary care (at the three levels mentioned above), involvement of GPs in policy making, communication and coordination (with patients and in between medical teams), stressors and worries; in addition to a fifth theme to conclude the GPs' suggestions for improvement (either proposed mitigation strategies, or existing actions that showed relative success). A participant used an expression of "infodemic" to describe the GPs' everyday pressure of receiving new policy updates with their subsequent changes in practice. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all levels of the health system in the UK, particularly primary care. Based on the GPs' perspective in NWL, changes to practice have offered opportunities to maintain safe healthcare as well as possible drawbacks that should be of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Practitioners/psychology , Patient Safety , Primary Health Care , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Health Policy , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , Policy Making , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561834

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes and safety and human resources in healthcare organisations. This study aims to examine factors that influence workplace silence among hospital doctors in Ireland. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A national, cross-sectional, online survey of hospital doctors in Ireland was conducted in October-November 2019; 1,070 hospital doctors responded. This paper focuses on responses to the question "If you had concerns about your working conditions, would you raise them?". In total, 227 hospital doctor respondents (25%) stated that they would not raise concerns about their working conditions. Qualitative thematic analysis was carried out on free-text responses to explore why these doctors choose to opt for silence regarding their working conditions. FINDINGS: Reputational risk, lack of energy and time, a perceived inability to effect change and cultural norms all discourage doctors from raising concerns about working conditions. Apathy arose as change to working conditions was perceived as highly unlikely. In turn, this had scope to lead to neglect and exit. Voice was seen as risky for some respondents, who feared that complaining could damage their career prospects and workplace relationships. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study highlights the systemic, cultural and practical issues that pressure hospital doctors in Ireland to opt for silence around working conditions. It adds to the literature on workplace silence and voice within the medical profession and provides a framework for comparative analysis of doctors' silence and voice in other settings.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Workplace , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Ireland
12.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 30(4): 1673-1685, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545671

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study assessed and described potential clinical practice changes secondary to COVID-19 that emerged as an early response to the pandemic for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) engaged in voice, alaryngeal, and swallowing activities that may increase the risk of virus transmission. Method SLPs from the United States and Canada (n = 665) who were engaged in clinical activities that might elevate the risk of COVID-19 exposure completed an online survey regarding their clinical practices. Topics assessed included potential clinical service modifications, COVID-19 testing and health, and potential financial impacts in the early time period of the pandemic. Results The percentage of SLPs completing the most endoscopic procedures prepandemic (≥ 10/week) was reduced from 39% of respondents to 3% due to the pandemic. Those who completed the most tracheoesophageal puncture voice prosthesis changes (≥ 5/week) reported a reduction in frequency from 24% to 6%. Twenty-five percent of SLPs reported that they were tested for COVID-19, and 6% reported a positive result. Descriptive statistics suggest that COVID-19 testing rates of SLPs, the percentage of SLPs experiencing a financial impact, and the percentage who were furloughed varied across SLP work setting. Conclusions These findings provide the first data characterizing the impact on COVID-19 on clinical practice for SLPs engaged in procedures such as endoscopy and laryngectomy care. The results indicate that, as frontline workers, SLPs were directly impacted in their practice patterns, personal health, safety, and financial security, and that these reported impacts occurred differently across SLP work settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pathologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
13.
Emerg Med Australas ; 33(6): 1106-1109, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528344
15.
Ann Intern Med ; 173(7): 527-535, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic spurred health systems across the world to quickly shift from in-person visits to safer video visits. OBJECTIVE: To seek stakeholder perspectives on video visits' acceptability and effect 3 weeks after near-total transition to video visits. DESIGN: Semistructured qualitative interviews. SETTING: 6 Stanford general primary care and express care clinics at 6 northern California sites, with 81 providers, 123 staff, and 97 614 patient visits in 2019. PARTICIPANTS: 53 program participants (overlapping roles as medical providers [n = 20], medical assistants [n = 16], nurses [n = 4], technologists [n = 4], and administrators [n = 13]) were interviewed about video visit transition and challenges. INTERVENTION: In 3 weeks, express care and primary care video visits increased from less than 10% to greater than 80% and from less than 10% to greater than 75%, respectively. New video visit providers received video visit training and care quality feedback. New system workflows were created to accommodate the new visit method. MEASUREMENTS: 9 faculty, trained in qualitative research methods, conducted 53 stakeholder interviews in 4 days using purposeful (administrators and technologists) and convenience (medical assistant, nurses, and providers) sampling. A rapid qualitative analytic approach for thematic analysis was used. RESULTS: The analysis revealed 12 themes, including Pandemic as Catalyst; Joy in Medicine; Safety in Medicine; Slipping Through the Cracks; My Role, Redefined; and The New Normal. Themes were analyzed using the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) framework to identify critical issues for continued program utilization. LIMITATIONS: Evaluation was done immediately after deployment. Although viewpoints may have evolved later, immediate evaluation allowed for prompt program changes and identified broader issues to address for program sustainability. CONCLUSION: After pandemic-related systems transformation at Stanford, critical issues to sustain video visit long-term viability were identified. Specifically, technology ease of use must improve and support multiparty videoconferencing. Providers should be able to care for their patients, regardless of geography. Providers need decision-making support with virtual examination training and home-based patient diagnostics. Finally, ongoing video visit reimbursement should be commensurate with value to the patients' health and well-being. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Stanford Department of Medicine and Stanford Health Care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Primary Health Care/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , California/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
16.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260049, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518366

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccination against COVID-19 is a key global public health strategy. Health professionals including midwives and doctors support and influence vaccination uptake by childbearing women. There is currently no evidence regarding the COVID-19 vaccination perceptions and intentions of those who receive or provide maternity care in Australia. The aim of this study was to address this gap in knowledge and explore the perceptions and intentions regarding COVID-19 vaccination from consumers and providers of maternity care in Australia. METHODS: A national cross-sectional online study conducted in early 2021 in Australia, a country that has had a very low number of COVID-19 cases and deaths. Recruitment was undertaken through parenting and health professional social media sites and professional college distribution lists. A total of 853 completed responses, from women (n = 326), maternity care providers including doctors (n = 58), midwives (n = 391) and midwifery students (n = 78). FINDINGS: Personal intention to be vaccinated ranged from 48-89% with doctors most likely and women least likely. Doctors and midwifery students were significantly more likely to recommend the vaccine to pregnant women in their care than midwives (p<0.001). Fewer doctors (2%) felt that women should wait until breastfeeding had concluded before being vaccinated compared with 24% of midwives and 21% of midwifery students (p<0.001). More than half of the midwives (53%) had concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine for the women in their care compared with 35% of doctors and 46% of midwifery students. Despite national guidelines recommending vaccination of breastfeeding women, 54% of practitioners were unlikely to recommend vaccination for this group. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to explore the perceptions and intentions regarding COVID-19 vaccination from the perspective of those who receive and provide maternity care in Australia. Findings have utility to support targeted public health messaging for these and other cohorts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Maternal Health Services , Perception , Vaccination , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Australia , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512275

ABSTRACT

Restraint use in Australian residential aged care has been highlighted by the media, and investigated by researchers, government and advocacy bodies. In 2018, the Royal Commission into Aged Care selected 'Restraint' as a key focus of inquiry. Subsequently, Federal legislation was passed to ensure restraint is only used in residential aged care services as the 'last resort'. To inform and develop Government educational resources, we conducted qualitative research to gain greater understanding of the experiences and attitudes of aged care stakeholders around restraint practice. Semi-structured interviews were held with 28 participants, comprising nurses, care staff, physicians, physiotherapists, pharmacists and relatives. Two focus groups were also conducted to ascertain the views of residential and community aged care senior management staff. Data were thematically analyzed using a pragmatic approach of inductive and deductive coding and theme development. Five themes were identified during the study: 1. Understanding of restraint; 2. Support for legislation; 3. Restraint-free environments are not possible; 4. Low-level restraint; 5. Restraint in the community is uncharted. Although most staff, health practitioners and relatives have a basic understanding of restraint, more education is needed at a conceptual level to enable them to identify and avoid restraint practice, particularly 'low-level' forms and chemical restraint. There was strong support for the new restraint regulations, but most interviewees admitted they were unsure what the legislation entailed. With regards to resources, stakeholders wanted recognition that there were times when restraint was necessary and advice on what to do in these situations, as opposed to unrealistic aspirations for restraint-free care. Stakeholders reported greater oversight of restraint in residential aged care but specified that community restraint use was largely unknown. Research is needed to investigate the extent and types of restraint practice in community aged care.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Restraint, Physical , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Australia , Focus Groups , Humans , Qualitative Research
19.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259658, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503743

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate nurses' behavioral intention toward caring for COVID-19 patients on mechanical ventilation, as well as the factors affecting their intention. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation have many care needs and pose more challenges for nurses, which might adversely affect nurses' intention toward caring behavior. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted by using simple random sampling to recruit 598 nurses from five tertiary hospitals in Sichuan Province, China. The participants responded to an online questionnaire that included questions on demographic characteristics; the Attitude, Subjective Norms, and Behavioral Intention of Nurses toward Mechanically Ventilated Patients (ASIMP) questionnaire; the Nursing Professional Identity Scale (NPIS); and the Compassion Fatigue-Short Scale (CF-Short Scale). ANOVA, Spearman correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression were performed to analyze the data. RESULTS: The mean total behavioral intention score was 179.46 (± 14.83) out of a total score of 189.00, which represented a high level of intention toward caring for patients on mechanical ventilation. Multiple linear regression revealed that subjective norms (ß = 0.390, P<0.001), perceived behavioral control (ß = 0.149, P<0.001), professional identity (ß = 0.101, P = 0.009), and compassion fatigue (ß = 0.088 P = 0.024) were significant predictors of nurses' behavioral intention. CONCLUSIONS: Most nurses have a positive behavioral intention to care for COVID-19 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. The findings in this study provide some insight for developing effective and tailored strategies to promote nurses' behavioral intention toward caring for ventilated patients under the pandemic situation.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/therapy , Nurses , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Adult , Behavior , China/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Pandemics , Regression Analysis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Semin Speech Lang ; 42(5): 395-418, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500796

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine and describe experiences and perceptions of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) serving children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Twenty SLPs were interviewed using an online audio platform regarding common practices, resources and supports, challenges, and communication. Participants' responses to the semi-structured questions were transcribed and analyzed to identify themes in experiences. Results suggested six overall themes including: considerations for assessment; cultural impact; linguistic access and barriers; professional preparedness; impact of COVID-19; and helpful tips and resources. The discussion includes recommendations and resources to address obstacles.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Multilingualism , Speech Therapy , Speech-Language Pathology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Delivery of Health Care , Family , Humans , Infant , Young Adult
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