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1.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e065719, 2023 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241385

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand how and why Australian cancer physicians interact with the pharmaceutical industry. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured interviews, performed by a medical oncologist. Thematic analysis using a combination of deductive and inductive codes. SETTING: Given the evidence on industry influences on clinical practice and the importance to the market of oncology drugs, we sought to better understand cancer physicians' experiences. Practising consultant medical oncologists and clinical haematologists from four Australian states were interviewed over Zoom. PARTICIPANTS: 16 cancer physicians were interviewed between November 2021 and March 2022, from 37 invited (response rate 43%). Most were medical oncologists (n=12 of 16, 75%) and male (n=9 of 16, 56%). OUTCOME MEASURES: The analysis of all interviews was based on grounded theory. Transcripts were coded and then codes formed into themes with supporting quotes. The themes were then placed into categories, used to describe the broad areas into which the themes could be grouped. RESULTS: Six themes were identified that fell within two broad categories: cancer physicians' views and experiences of interactions and management of these interactions. Views and experiences included: the transactional nature of relationships, risks of research dependence, ethical challenges and varied attitudes based on interaction type. Management themes included: lack of useful guidance and reduced interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic. These led to an overarching seventh theme, on the desire for a 'middle road'. Cancer physicians identified the transactional nature of industry relationships and felt uncomfortable with several types of interactions, including those with sales representatives. Most wanted less contact with industry, and the forced separation that occurred with the COVID-19 pandemic was generally welcome. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer physicians may have difficulty balancing the perceived need to interact with industry in modern cancer care while maintaining distance to minimise conflicts of interest. Further research is needed to assess management strategies in this area.


Subject(s)
Drug Industry , Medical Oncology , Physicians , Humans , Male , Attitude of Health Personnel , Australia , Conflict of Interest , COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Female
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 387, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in not only significant mortalities in Vietnam but has had an impact on its economy. Previous studies have highlighted how the pandemic has had a marginal impact on Vietnamese healthcare workers working at the frontlines. To date, there have been several other studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on intentions to transition between jobs among healthcare professionals, but this has yet to be explored amongst Vietnamese healthcare workers. METHODS: To achieve the study's objectives an online cross-sectional study was conducted between September to November 2021. Snowball sampling methodology was adopted for the recruitment of participants. The questionnaire that was used for this study comprised of the following sections: (a) socio-demographic information; (b) impact of COVID-19 on work; (c) risk of exposure to COVID-19; (d) career choices/intentions to change job, and (e) motivation at work. RESULTS: There were 5727 completed the entire survey. 17.2% of the respondents have had increased job satisfaction, 26.4% reported increased motivation to work, and 40.9% reported decreased motivation to work. Whilst there were changes in the daily work intensity and the level of work-related stress, more than 60% of respondents we sampled did not intend to switch careers. Demographic variables like gender, whether one was a student or an existing healthcare worker, and income related to work motivation. The community's stigma was a negative factor that declined intrinsic motivation as well as decreased work retention. CONCLUSIONS: Our study is instrumental in identifying the impact of COVID-19 on career choices amongst Vietnamese healthcare workers. The factors identified have clear implications for policymaking.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Health Personnel
3.
BMC Med Ethics ; 24(1): 40, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic causes moral challenges and moral distress for healthcare professionals and, due to an increased work load, reduces time and opportunities for clinical ethics support services. Nevertheless, healthcare professionals could also identify essential elements to maintain or change in the future, as moral distress and moral challenges can indicate opportunities to strengthen moral resilience of healthcare professionals and organisations. This study describes 1) the experienced moral distress, challenges and ethical climate concerning end-of-life care of Intensive Care Unit staff during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and 2) their positive experiences and lessons learned, which function as directions for future forms of ethics support. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey combining quantitative and qualitative elements was sent to all healthcare professionals who worked at the Intensive Care Unit of the Amsterdam UMC - Location AMC during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey consisted of 36 items about moral distress (concerning quality of care and emotional stress), team cooperation, ethical climate and (ways of dealing with) end-of-life decisions, and two open questions about positive experiences and suggestions for work improvement. RESULTS: All 178 respondents (response rate: 25-32%) showed signs of moral distress, and experienced moral dilemmas in end-of-life decisions, whereas they experienced a relatively positive ethical climate. Nurses scored significantly higher than physicians on most items. Positive experiences were mostly related to 'team cooperation', 'team solidarity' and 'work ethic'. Lessons learned were mostly related to 'quality of care' and 'professional qualities'. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the crisis, positive experiences related to ethical climate, team members and overall work ethic were reported by Intensive Care Unit staff and quality and organisation of care lessons were learned. Ethics support services can be tailored to reflect on morally challenging situations, restore moral resilience, create space for self-care and strengthen team spirit. This can improve healthcare professionals' dealing of inherent moral challenges and moral distress in order to strengthen both individual and organisational moral resilience. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered on The Netherlands Trial Register, number NL9177.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Attitude of Health Personnel , Stress, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Morals , Surveys and Questionnaires , Death
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244006

ABSTRACT

Haematological patients are more susceptible to infections. Vaccination has always been the most effective primary prevention strategy, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the efficacy of vaccines for some haematological patients is low. Although vaccination of Healthcare Workers (HCWs) could protect patients from vaccine-preventable diseases, there is evidence of a high level of hesitation among healthcare workers in Italy. The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes towards vaccination of HCWs caring for haematology patients. Qualitative descriptive design was conducted. Twenty-one HCWs were interviewed. Content analysis was applied to the qualitative data. The following themes were generated from the analysis: "Trust", "Decision-making process focusing on individual health", "Decision-making process focusing on community health", "Changing opinion", and "Two sides of vaccination commitment". The most hesitant HCWs were oriented towards individual health. They perceived a lack of benefit from vaccines, feared side effects, or were influenced by negative experiences of others. In contrast, community-health-oriented HCWs showed more positive attitudes towards vaccination. Some hesitant HCWs changed their opinion on vaccination because they began to reflect on the importance of vaccination for the community. The change in opinion of some HCWs interviewed provided insight into the importance of focusing organisational efforts on collective responsibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Health Personnel , Attitude of Health Personnel
5.
J Nurs Educ ; 62(6): 343-350, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235499

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses play key roles as vaccination agents and frontline workers who deal with prejudice and misinformation. This study examined the attitudes and perceptions of nursing students regarding corona-virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination and its social and institutional management. METHOD: This qualitative study consisted of an exploratory phase involving first- and fourth-year nursing students and a second phase using the PhotoVoice tool SHOWED mnemonic method followed by discussion groups with second-year nursing students. RESULTS: Three themes emerged: (1) hope tinged with fear; (2) too much information generating fear, uncertainty, and mistrust; and (3) leaders without recognition or voice. CONCLUSION: The results inform the body of knowledge in nursing science and enhance changes in clinical practice by providing new insights regarding the perceptions of nursing students on vaccination and its management, highlighting the need to train future nurses in health literacy and new ways to interact with community members. [J Nurs Educ. 2023;62(6):343-350.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Attitude of Health Personnel , Creativity , Qualitative Research
6.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286339, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242307

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A national survey we conducted in 2008 showed that many Japanese physicians interacted with and received gifts from pharmaceutical representatives (PRs) and had a positive attitude toward relationships with PRs. The revised promotion code of the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association in 2019 prohibited the provision of non-educational promotional aids including sticky notes, mouse pads, and calendars. During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, face-to-face meetings were socially restricted. This study assessed the extent of current Japanese physicians' involvement in pharmaceutical promotional activities and their attitudes toward relationships with PRs and to ascertain any changes between 2008 and 2021. We also examined the factors that predicted positive attitudes toward gifts from PRs. METHODS: From January to March 2021, we conducted a national mail survey of Japanese physicians in seven specialties: internal medicine, surgery, orthopedics, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, psychiatry, and ophthalmology. RESULTS: There were 1636 participants and the response rate was 63.2%. Most physicians met face-to-face with PRs (78.8%), whereas only a minority received meals outside the workplace (4.5%). PRs were thought to have an important role in continuing medical education (66.1%) and to provide accurate information about new drugs (74.2%). Opinions were divided on the appropriateness of gifts from PRs. Most thought that stationery and meals provided by the industry did not affect prescribing behavior (89.7% and 75.8%, respectively). Factors that predicted a positive attitude toward gifts from PRs were male, orthopedic specialty vs. internal medicine, more interactions with PRs, a positive attitude toward informational value, and no rules banning meetings with PRs. CONCLUSION: Involvement in pharmaceutical promotional activities is still common among practicing physicians in Japan, although the extent of the involvement had declined. Rules banning meetings with PRs appear to continue being effective at limiting a physician's involvement with promotional activities and their critical attitudes toward gifts from PRs.


Subject(s)
Drug Industry , Interprofessional Relations , Physicians , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Attitude of Health Personnel , East Asian People , Gift Giving , Practice Patterns, Physicians'
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 961060, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20230923

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare systems have modified their strategies to manage their staff, supplies, and space to deal systematically with the COVID-19 pandemic. This research aimed to explore the nature of hospital adjustments and the concerns of healthcare providers and administrative staff working in Governmental and private hospitals throughout the Qassim Region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) during the pandemic. Methods: A qualitative phenomenological study using semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 75 purposively selected healthcare providers and administrative staff working at three main hospitals in the Qassim Region, KSA. The maximum variation sampling technique was utilized. Recruitment of participants was continued until data saturation was reached. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Results: Four core themes were identified in this paper: (1) changes in hospital policy and procedures, (2) workforce management, (3) the well-being of the workforce, and (4) apprehensions and expectations of the workforce. The participants showed satisfaction with timely administrative decisions and new policies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, the psychological health of healthcare professionals was affected more than their physical state. Finally, the providers perceived the emergence of multiple concerns in the coming months. Conclusion: Although healthcare providers were initially overwhelmed, they gradually accepted new administrative policies. Numerous innovative interventions effectively reduced their physical workload and increased their productivity, but they remained significantly affected by a wide range of psychological disorders, with a high prevalence of obsessive-compulsive disorder. There were some concerns about the new SARS-CoV-2 variant, but the majority were optimistic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel
9.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 419, 2023 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318672

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) are integral to healthcare provision. However, healthcare has historically adopted a hierarchical power structure meaning some voices within the MDT have more influence than others. While power dynamics can influence interprofessional communication and care coordination, the field's understanding of these power structures during the COVID-19 pandemic is limited. METHODS: Adopting a narrative inquiry methodology, this research addresses this knowledge gap and provides an in-depth understanding of MDT power dynamics during COVID-19. Using semi-structured interviews (n = 35) and inductive thematic analysis, this research explores staff perspectives of changing power dynamics in MDTs during the pandemic response. RESULTS: An in-depth analysis generated three overarching themes: (1) Healthcare: a deeply embedded hierarchy reveals that while a hierarchical culture prevails within the Irish health system, staff perceptions of influence in MDTs and 'real' experiences of autonomy differ significantly. (2) Team characteristics: the influence of team structure on MDT power dynamics highlights the impact of organisational structures (e.g., staff rotations) and local processes (e.g., MDT meeting structure) on collaborative practice. (3) Ongoing effort to stimulate true collaboration underscores the importance of ongoing interprofessional education to support collaborative care. CONCLUSION: By offering a greater understanding of MDT power dynamics throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, this research supports the development of more appropriate strategies to promote the provision of interprofessional care in practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interprofessional Relations , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Attitude of Health Personnel
10.
BMC Med Ethics ; 24(1): 30, 2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314697

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Moral distress appears when a healthcare professional is not able to carry out actions in accordance with their professional ethical standards. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised is the most widely used to assess levels of moral distress, but it is not validated in Spanish. The aim of the study is to validate the Spanish version of the Moral Distress Scale - utilised within a sample of Spanish healthcare professionals treating COVID-19 patients. METHODS: The original (english) and the portuguese and french versions of the scale were translated into spanish by native or bilingual researchers and reviewed by an academic expert in ethics and moral philosophy as well as by a clinical expert. RESEARCH DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study carried out using a self-reporting online survey. The data was collected between June- November 2020. A total of 661 professionals responded to the survey (N = 2873). PARTICIPANTS: healthcare professionals with more than two weeks of experience treating COVID-19 patients at the end of their life and working in the public sector of the Balearic Islands Health Service (Spain). Analyses included descriptive statistics, competitive confirmatory factor analysis, evidence on criterion-related validity and estimates of reliability. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at the University of Balearic Islands. RESULTS: An unidimensional model in which a general factor of moral distress explained by 11 items of the Spanish version of the MDS-R scale was an adequate representation of the data: χ2(44) = 113.492 (p 0.001); Comparative Fit Index = 0.965; Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = 0.079[0.062,0.097]; and Standarized Root Mean-Square = 0.037. Evidence of reliability was excellent: Cronbach's alpha = 0.886 and McDonald's omega = 0.910. Moral distress was related to discipline, with nurses having statistically significant higher levels than physicians. Additionally, moral distress successfully predicted professional quality of life, with higher levels of moral distress being related to poorer quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The Spanish version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised can be used as a reliable and valid measurement tool for the evaluation of moral distress experienced by health professionals. This tool will be highly useful for managers and applicable to a variety of healthcare professionals and settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Psychometrics/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Cross-Sectional Studies , Attitude of Health Personnel , Morals , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Trials ; 23(1): 411, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with acute conditions often lack the capacity to provide informed consent, and narrow therapeutic windows mean there is no time to seek consent from surrogates prior to treatment being commenced. One method to enable the inclusion of this study population in emergency research is through recruitment without prior consent, often known as 'deferred consent'. However, empirical studies have shown a large disparity in stakeholders' opinions regarding this enrolment method. This systematic review aimed to understand different stakeholder groups' attitudes to deferred consent, particularly in relation to the context in which deferred consent might occur. METHODS: Databases including MEDLINE, EMCare, PsychINFO, Scopus, and HMIC were searched from 1996 to January 2021. Eligible studies focussed on deferred consent processes for adults only, in the English language, and reported empirical primary research. Studies of all designs were included. Relevant data were extracted and thematically coded using a narrative approach to 'tell a story' of the findings. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies were included in the narrative synthesis. The majority examined patient views (n = 19). Data from the members of the public (n = 5) and health care professionals (n =5) were also reported. Four overarching themes were identified: level of acceptability of deferred consent, research-related factors influencing acceptability, personal characteristics influencing views on deferred consent, and data use after refusal of consent or participant death. CONCLUSIONS: This review indicates that the use of deferred consent would be most acceptable to stakeholders during low-risk emergency research with a narrow therapeutic window and where there is potential for patients to benefit from their inclusion. While the use of narrative synthesis allowed assessment of the included studies, heterogeneous outcome measures meant that variations in study results could not be reliably attributed to the different trial characteristics. Future research should aim to develop guidance for research ethics committees when reviewing trials using deferred consent in emergency research and investigate more fully the views of healthcare professionals which to date have been explored less than patients and members of the public. Trial registration PROSPERO CRD42020223623.


Subject(s)
Ethics Committees, Research , Informed Consent , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Research Design
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critical Care Providers (CCPs) experience situations that challenge their ethics and professional standards and may entail moral distress (MD). AIM: To analyze MD perceived by CCPs in intensive care units (ICUs) or emergency departments (EDs) and further clarify whether CCPs who rely on spiritual resources differ in their perception of MD from those who do not utilize these resources. METHODS: A cross-sectional anonymous survey was administered using a modified version of the German language version of the Moral Distress Scale (MDS) with 2 × 12 items to assess the frequency and the respective perceived burden of specific situations by applying a 5-point Likert scale. Explorative factor analysis was performed and the sub-constructs of the respective items regarding MD frequency and burden were identified. Job burden and professional satisfaction were measured using visual analogue scales (VAS) and a four-point Likert scale, respectively. The 15-item SpREUK questionnaire was applied to measure spiritual attitudes and behaviours and to differentiate between religious and spiritual persons. Data from 385 German-speaking CCPs were included (55% physicians, 45% nurses). RESULTS: Conflict situations are similar for physicians and nurses although they are perceived as more burdensome by nurses. Among physicians, the MDS factor Looking away/Resignation scores highest for assistant physician residents, whereas distress caused by looking away is more often perceived by specialist physicians without a managerial position. Work satisfaction is inversely associated with MD and emotional exhaustion is positively associated with it. Participants' spirituality is marginally associated with MD. The best predictors of both MD frequency and burden are emotional exhaustion with further influences of work satisfaction, being a nurse, and being a non-believer on the frequency of MD perception. Being a nurse, participants' experience in ICU/ED, and being of the male gender are further predictors of MD burden. CONCLUSIONS: MD is experienced differently by different groups of CCPs depending on their place in the hierarchy of responsibility. As MD perception is best predicted by emotional exhaustion, these situations should be avoided. Although some CCPs may rely on spiritual resources, all need individual and team support to cope with MD.


Subject(s)
Morals , Stress, Psychological , Humans , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Critical Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
14.
Nurs Open ; 10(8): 5252-5260, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293881

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to: (1) assess the level of moral sensitivity of nurses and the quality of nursing care for patients with COVID-19 in Iran; and (2) identify the relationship between the moral sensitivity of nurses and the quality of nursing care for patients with COVID-19 in Iran. DESIGN: This study was designed as a descriptive, cross-sectional, and correlational research. METHOD: A total of 211 nurses working in four hospitals affiliated with the Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in Iran from December 2021 to April 2022 were selected via the stratified proportional random sampling method. Demographic information, a moral sensitivity questionnaire, and the Good Nursing Care Scale were used for data collection. The data were analysed by SPSS 24 based on descriptive and inferential statistics (Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression). RESULTS: Results revealed that 188 of the nurses (89.1%) had a moderate level of moral sensitivity. Furthermore, 160 of the participants (75.8%) reported a relatively low level of the quality of nursing care. The results of the Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated that there was an inverse and significant relationship between the moral sensitivity of nurses and the quality of nursing care (r = -0.528, p < 0.001). The results of multiple regression indicated that the model of moral sensitivity components explained 27.9% of the variance in the quality of nursing care. The components of moral sensitivity, including relation (ß = -0.246, p < 0.001), meaning (ß = -0.188, p = 0.003), conflict (ß = -0.170, p = 0.008), benevolence (ß = -0.153, p = 0.012), and rules (ß = -0.144, p = 0.019) had inverse and significant effects on the quality of nursing care. CONCLUSION: Since higher mean scores of moral sensitivity reflect lower moral sensitivity, it can be stated that with the increase in moral sensitivity of nurses, the quality of nursing care for patients with COVID-19 grows.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Care , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Stress, Psychological , Attitude of Health Personnel , Morals
15.
Ann Ig ; 35(5): 560-571, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293682

ABSTRACT

Background: Increasing adherence to influenza vaccination among healthcare workers is a public health priority, stated that actually remains far below than international recommendations. During the 2020/2021 pandemic season, COVID-19 vaccines were not yet available until the end of December 2020, and influenza vaccines were the only one available to protect against seasonal respiratory diseases. The main objective of the present study was to assess knowledge, attitudes and adherence to influenza and other vaccinations recommended by the National Immunization Plan 2017-2021 for healthcare workers. Methods: Enrollment lasted from October and December 2020 at the vaccination unit of the University Hospital of Palermo. Data were collected through an anonymous and self-administered questionnaire, divided into 5 sections and 31 items. Results: Among 734 healthcare professionals that completed the survey, a significantly higher adherence to influenza vaccination was observed among healthcare workers that were more prone to receive COVID-19 vaccination (OR=4.02; 95% CI: 1.63-9.91). Moreover, higher influenza vaccination rates were observed among healthcare professionals that received influenza vaccination during previous 2019/2020 season (OR=15.3; 95% CI: 5.17-45.1) and that were favorable to the possible impact on increasing adherence of influenza mandatory vaccination (OR=4.88; 95% CI: 2.43-9.80). Conclusions: Propensity of healthcare workers to undergo vaccinations recommended in the National Immunization Plan increased during the first pandemic season. At the end of the vaccination season, flu vaccination coverage reached highest rates ever at the University Hospital of Palermo (around 60%), remaining anyway below the recommended minimum value of 75%. During next seasonal flu vaccination campaigns, it becomes essential to promote communication and information strategies to increase flu vaccination among healthcare workers, also focusing on co-administration with the anti-COVID-19 booster/seasonal doses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Seasons , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Italy/epidemiology , Hospitals, University , Attitude of Health Personnel , Health Personnel
16.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e068918, 2023 04 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292504

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the experience of moral distress among intensive care unit (ICU) professionals in the UK. DESIGN: Mixed methods: validated quantitative measure of moral distress followed by purposive sample of respondents who underwent semistructured interviews. SETTING: Four ICUs of varying sizes and specialty facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Healthcare professionals working in ICU. RESULTS: 227 questionnaires were returned and 15 interviews performed. Moral distress occurred across all ICUs and professional demographics. It was most commonly related to providing care perceived as futile or against the patient's wishes/interests, followed by resource constraints compromising care. Moral distress score was independently influenced by profession (p=0.02) (nurses 117.0 vs doctors 78.0). A lack of agency was central to moral distress and its negative experience could lead to withdrawal from engaging with patients/families. One-third indicated their intention to leave their current post due to moral distress and this was greater among nurses than doctors (37.0% vs 15.0%). Moral distress was independently associated with an intention to leave their current post (p<0.0001) and a previous post (p=0.001). Participants described a range of individualised coping strategies tailored to the situations faced. The most common and highly valued strategies were informal and relied on working within a supportive environment along with a close-knit team, although participants acknowledged there was a role for structured and formalised intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Moral distress is widespread among UK ICU professionals and can have an important negative impact on patient care, professional wellbeing and staff retention, a particularly concerning finding as this study was performed prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moral distress due to resource-related issues is more severe than comparable studies in North America. Interventions to support professionals should recognise the individualistic nature of coping with moral distress. The value of close-knit teams and supportive environments has implications for how intensive care services are organised.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological , Job Satisfaction , Intensive Care Units , Morals , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
17.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 48(4): 101538, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292403

ABSTRACT

This is the first study to provide a holistic examination of cardiologists' well-being, investigating positive and negative dimensions, and its determinants. We conducted a national, multicenter, self-administered web-based questionnaire. We used frequencies to depict scores on three well-being indicators (professional fulfillment, work exhaustion and interpersonal disengagement) and performed three multiple regression analyses to elucidate their determinants. Cardiologists' mean scores (scale 1 to 5) were 3.85 (SD = 0.62) for professional fulfillment, 2.25 (SD = 0.97) for work exhaustion and 2.04 (SD = 0.80) for interpersonal disengagement. Workload, work-home interference and team atmosphere predicted the negative dimensions of well-being. Autonomy predicted cardiologists' professional fulfillment. Physician-patient interactions, person-job fit and individual resilience affected both dimensions. Dutch cardiologists score relatively high on professional fulfillment and average on work exhaustion and interpersonal disengagement. In order to foster cardiologists' well-being it is critical to increase energy providing work- and individual aspects.


Subject(s)
Cardiologists , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Ethnicity , Attitude of Health Personnel , Multicenter Studies as Topic
18.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 23(11): 1150-1156, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2290443

ABSTRACT

AIM: The study sought to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of infection control among dental healthcare personnel (DHCP) in dental settings, with updated guidelines and recommendations regarding the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was an observational cross-sectional study. A self-administrative online survey consisting of 45 close-ended statements was prepared, validated, and revised by an expert panel, and pilot tested with a convenience sample. The survey comprised four parts covering the following aspects: demographic data, infection control facilities in the dental office, knowledge of infection control measures, and attitude toward infection control. Data were collected, analyzed, and presented as frequencies and percentages or means and standard deviations, when applicable. The independent t-test or analysis of variance (ANOVA), as appropriate, were used for differences in knowledge and attitude scores between the groups, with the significance level of p-value < 0.05. RESULTS: Out of 176 participants, 54 (30.7%) were men, and 122 (69.3%) were women. A total of 143 participants were dental practitioners (81.3%), and more than half [94 (53.4%)] were from governmental universities, followed by those from government dental clinics [44 (25%)]. In general, most participants acknowledged the infection control facilities in their dental offices. Dental assistants, respondents working in private universities, and respondents working in the eastern region showed better knowledge than their counterparts (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were noticed between the different groups concerning attitude toward infection control (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The participants exhibited acceptable knowledge and attitude, with respondents from private universities and dental assistance attaining better knowledge scores. More infection control programs and training courses should be implemented in dental settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Attitude of Health Personnel , Professional Role , Infection Control , Surveys and Questionnaires
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