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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(30): e26781, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191045

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted our clinical practice. Many gastroenterologists have changed their attitudes toward various gastroenterological clinical settings. The aim of the present study is to explore the gastroenterologist's attitudes in several clinical settings encountered in the clinical practice.An online based survey was completed by 101 of 250 Israeli gastroenterologists (40.5%).Most of the participants were males (76.2%), and most of them were in the age range of 40 to 50 (37.6%). For all questionnaire components, the 2 most common chosen options were "I perform endoscopy with N95 mask, gloves and gown protection in a standard endoscopy room without preendoscopy severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing" and "Tend to postpone endoscopy until SARS-CoV-2 test is performed because of fear from being infected, or virus spreading in the endoscopy suite." Notably, 12 (11.9%) gastroenterologists were infected by Coronavirus disease 2019 during their work. Classifying the clinical settings to either elective and non-elective, most gastroenterologists (77.4%) chose the attitude of "I perform endoscopy with N95 mask, gloves and gown protection in a standard endoscopy room without SARS-COV-2 testing" in the nonelective settings as compared to 54.2% for the elective settings, (P < .00001), whereas 32.9% of the responders chose the attitude of "Tend to postpone endoscopy until SARS-COV-2 test is performed because of fear from being infected, or virus spreading in the endoscopy suite" in the elective settings (P < .00001).Gastroenterologists' attitude in various gastroenterological settings was based on the clinical indication. Further studies are needed to assess the long-term consequences of the different attitudes.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastroenterologists/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Endoscopy, Digestive System/adverse effects , Endoscopy, Digestive System/psychology , Female , Gastroenterologists/psychology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Israel , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(28): e26646, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191031

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The SARS- CoV-2 virus has been a public health crisis since its emergence in 2019. It has affected nearly all aspects of life. Education has been particularly hit, and a lot of effort has been put to implement more and more virtual platforms through online classes, meetings and conferences. Medical education has also been affected, especially because of the need for hands-on education, specifically in the clinical setting of the last 2 years. This had a huge psychological impact on the medical students currently enrolled in medical schools around the globe.In this descriptive study, we sent all medical students at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUBFM) an online anonymous survey by email. The survey started with general questions (age, gender and medical school year), followed by 3 sections that contain questions pertaining to the attitudes of medical students towards clinical rotations and online classes. Data was then analyzed using SPSSv24 and was then reported as percentages.Students were almost equally divided among the medical school classes (Med 1, 2, 3, and 4). The majority of clinical students (Med 3 and Med 4) reported that they feel nervous during their rotations in the hospital. Moreover, they reported that they have increased their use of disinfectants and personal protective equipment since the emergence of the pandemic. Moreover, the majority of medical students reported that they feel more stressed after shifting to online classes. Medical students also reported that they would be willing to go back to on-campus classes.This study aimed at describing the response of medical students at AUBFM to the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of stress. Limited data exists in the literature concerning the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical students in the middle East. Medical students reported that they feel more stressed and nervous during their clinical rotations and after the shift to online education, affecting their academic and social life. Further studies using a larger sample size are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e26102, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191016

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Healthcare workers (HWs) perform a critical role not only in the clinical management of patients but also in providing adequate infection control and prevention measures and waste management procedures to be implemented in healthcare facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness and knowledge of COVID-19 infection control precautions and waste management procedures among HWs in Saudi Arabian hospitals.This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Information on knowledge, awareness, and practice of infection control and waste management procedures were obtained from the HWs using a structured questionnaire. A thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.Our findings indicated that most of the study participants were knowledgeable, with a mean score of 78.3%. In total, 92.5%, 90.3%, and 91.7% of the participants were aware of the infection control precautions, COVID-19 waste management procedures, the availability of infection control supplies, respectively. HWs' Knowledge regarding waste management and infection control procedures correlated significantly with sex (P ≤ .001 and <.001), education (P = .024 and .043), and working experience (P = .029 and .009), respectively.Most participants appreciated the importance of their role in infection control, surveillance, and monitoring of the ongoing safety practices in their patients as well as their facilities and communities.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Infection Control/standards , Medical Waste Disposal/standards , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Facilities/standards , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1357, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117914

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Herd immunity is necessary to contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Vaccination is the fastest and safest pandemic control strategy. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are essential in providing vaccination information. The aim of this study was to assess intent to be vaccinated against COVID-19 among HCWs in Egypt and to determine the factors that may influence their decision. METHODS: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted among HCWs who care for patients in several hospitals in Delta region, Egypt. The questionnaire included sociodemographic, clinical, and occupational data, intention to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, and beliefs and attitudes towards COVID-19 and its vaccination. RESULTS: The study included 455 HCWs with a mean age of 36.55 years (SD = 10.31) and 80% were females. The acceptance rate for the COVID-19 vaccine was 70.5%, while hesitancy and resistancy were both 17.6 and 11.9% respectively. About one-third (33.4%) of the subjects had previously contracted COVID-19. Most participants believed that they had a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 (71.6%). More than 64% believed they were at risk for vaccination side effects. Fear of infection and being at high risk of infection were the main drivers for COVID-19 vaccination, while the major barriers were waiting for additional experience with these new vaccines and having doubts about the vaccines' efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: The acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccination among HCWs is very high. This crucial group needs to be the focus of educational initiatives and campaigns designed to increase public awareness of the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Female , Humans , Adult , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Egypt/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Vaccination , Health Personnel
6.
J Postgrad Med ; 68(4): 187-193, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110487
7.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 45, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Commentators believe that the ethical decision-making climate is instrumental in enhancing interprofessional collaboration in intensive care units (ICUs). Our aim was twofold: (1) to determine the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave one's job among nurses and physicians, and between the different ICU types and (2) determine the association between the ethical climate, moral distress, and intention to leave. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study between May 2021 and August 2021 involving 206 nurses and physicians in a large urban academic hospital. We used the validated Ethical Decision-Making Climate Questionnaire (EDMCQ) and the Measure of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP) tools and asked respondents their intention to leave their jobs. We also made comparisons between the different ICU types. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to identify statistically significant associations between the Ethical Climate, Moral Distress, and Intention to Leave. RESULTS: Nurses perceived the ethical climate for decision-making as less favorable than physicians (p < 0.05). They also had significantly greater levels of moral distress and higher intention to leave their job rates than physicians. Regarding the ICU types, the Neonatal/Pediatric unit had a significantly higher overall ethical climate score than the Medical and Surgical units (3.54 ± 0.66 vs. 3.43 ± 0.81 vs. 3.30 ± 0.69; respectively; both p ≤ 0.05) and also demonstrated lower moral distress scores (both p < 0.05) and lower "intention to leave" scores compared with both the Medical and Surgical units. The ethical climate and moral distress scores were negatively correlated (r = -0.58, p < 0.001); moral distress and "intention to leave" was positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.001); and ethical climate and "intention to leave" were negatively correlated (r = -0.50, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Significant differences exist in the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave between nurses and physicians and between the different ICU types. Inspecting the individual factors of the ethical climate and moral distress tools can help hospital leadership target organizational factors that improve interprofessional collaboration, lessening moral distress, decreasing turnover, and improved patient care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Intention , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Job Satisfaction , Morals , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Euro Surveill ; 27(17)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089691

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe start of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign among French healthcare and welfare sector workers in January 2021 offered an opportunity to study psychological antecedents of vaccination in this group.AimWe explored whether knowledge and attitude items related to social conformism and confidence in systems contributed to explaining intention for COVID-19 vaccination.MethodsWe developed a knowledge and attitude questionnaire with 30 items related to five established and two hypothetical psychological antecedents of vaccination (KA-7C). The online questionnaire was distributed from 18 December 2020 to 1 February 2021 through chain-referral via professional networks, yielding a convenience sample. We used multivariable logistic regression to explore the associations of individual and grouped KA-7C items with COVID-19 vaccine intention.ResultsAmong 5,234 participants, the vaccine intention model fit (pseudo R-squared values) increased slightly but significantly from 0.62 to 0.65 when adding social conformism and confidence in systems items. Intention to vaccinate was associated with the majority opinion among family and friends (OR: 11.57; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.51-29.67) and a positive perception of employer's encouragement to get vaccinated (vs negative; OR: 6.41; 95% CI: 3.36-12.22). The strongest association of a knowledge item was identifying the statement 'Some stages of vaccine development (testing) have been skipped because of the epidemic emergency.' as false (OR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.73-3.22).ConclusionThe results suggest that social conformism and confidence in systems are distinct antecedents of vaccination among healthcare and welfare workers, which should be taken into account in vaccine promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Intention , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
10.
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065957

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the care of critically ill and dying patients in isolation wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and regular wards was severely impaired. In order to support physicians in communicative and palliative care skills, an e-learning tool was developed as part of the joint project "Palliative Care in Pandemic Times" (PallPan). This study investigates the feasibility of this e-learning tool. Secondly, we aim to analyze changes in knowledge and attitude upon completion of the e-learning tool. A 38-item questionnaire-based evaluation study with assessment of global and specific outcomes including ICU and non-ICU physicians was performed. In total, 24 questionnaires were included in the anonymous analysis. Feasibility was confirmed by a very high rate of overall satisfaction (94% approval), with relevance reaching 99% approval. Overall, we detected high gains in knowledge and noticeably lower gains on the attitude plane, with the highest gain in naming reasons for incorporating palliative care. The lowest learning gain on the attitude plane was observed when the participants were confronted with their own mortality. This study shows that e-learning is a feasible tool for gaining knowledge and even changing the attitudes of physicians caring for critically ill and dying patients in a self-assessment evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Physicians , Terminal Care , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Humans , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275627, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created unprecedented pressures on healthcare systems and led to the widespread adoption of telepharmacy services, a practice that was not previously established in the state of Qatar. OBJECTIVE: The -study aimed to explore clinical pharmacists' (CPs) perspectives and experiences in utilizing telepharmacy for the provision of pharmaceutical care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive, qualitative approach using face-to-face focus group (FG) discussions was used. CPs across Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) were purposively invited to participate in the study. FG discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and validated. Transcripts were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Recruitment continued until a saturation point was achieved. RESULTS: We conducted five focus groups that included 23 CPs and led to seven themes. Overall, CPs reported inadequate preparedness for the practice of telepharmacy, which they perceived as challenging. The primary perceived benefits of telepharmacy were decreased infection exposure risk, improved quality of care, improved patients' satisfaction, and enhanced workplace efficiency and productivity. The main highlighted risks of telepharmacy were related to threatened patient confidentiality, missed pharmaceutical care opportunities, and negatively impacted professional rapport with other healthcare providers; and the major perceived challenges were low digital health literacy, complex illnesses and medication regimens, lack of standardized protocols, and inadequacy of resources and cultural resistance for virtual care. Participants recommended standardization and training, resource allocation, and proper service promotion as potential facilitators of telepharmacy practice. CONCLUSION: The current study revealed that despite perceived barriers, pharmacists identified several benefits of telepharmacy and recommended potential facilitators that should be used to integrate and sustain the practice of telepharmacy in the future. Future studies should investigate the impact of telepharmacy on clinical pharmacy interventions and patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Pharmacy Services , Pharmacy Service, Hospital , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Focus Groups , Humans , Pandemics , Pharmacists , Professional Role , Qatar/epidemiology
13.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 11(1): 105, 2022 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064852

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) were the priority group for influenza vaccination, in China during the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 influenza seasons. However, vaccination rates in HCWs have always been low. This study investigated influenza vaccination status among Chinese HCWs and analyzed the factors driving vaccination. METHODS: We provided electronic questionnaires to HCWs from January 27, 2022 to February 21, 2022, using the WeChat platform "Breath Circles". HCWs who received the link could also forward it to their colleagues. Binary logistic regression models were used to analyze vaccination-associated factors among HCWs. RESULTS: Among the 1697 HCWs surveyed, vaccination coverage was 43.7% (741/1697) during the 2020/2021 influenza season, and 35.4% (600/1697) during the 2021/2022 influenza season, as of February 21, 2022. Additionally, 22.7% (385/1697) and 22.1% (358/1697) of HCWs reported that their workplaces implemented a free vaccination policy for all employees during the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 influenza seasons. HCWs who were required to be vaccinated according to hospital regulations, and whose hospitals implemented the free influenza vaccine policy were more likely to be vaccinated (2020/2021 and 2021/2022; P < 0.05). In addition, the economic level of the HCWs' province (2021/2022, P < 0.05) and the HCWs' knowledge about vaccination and willingness to get vaccinated, such as active learning about vaccines (2020/2021, P < 0.05), supportive attitude toward vaccination for all HCWs (2020/2021 and 2021/2022; P < 0.05), also had an impact on vaccine coverage. CONCLUSIONS: A free influenza vaccination policy and workplace required vaccination are effective in improving influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs. Influenza vaccination coverage of Chinese HCWs remained low and showed a downward trend after the COVID-19 outbreak. Further effective measures, such as advocacy campaigns, free vaccine policies, and on-site vaccination could be implemented to improve influenza vaccination coverage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination , Vaccination Coverage
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(17): 6084-6089, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056906

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Healthcare outbreaks, especially infectious disease pandemics, often stretch the healthcare systems to its limits. Healthcare systems have no option other than being supported by the participation of young and motivated healthcare providers (HCPs) in their undergraduate medical studies during their prevention and control internship program during the outbreak. Understanding key motivation factors influencing HCPs are vital to ensure their effective participation in such situations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 410 undergraduate medical students at Qassim University in Saudi Arabia with the aim to describe the motivation factors that affect their willingness to volunteer during a pandemic. An online survey questionnaire was conducted. RESULTS: 410 participants of which 239 (58.29%) were female, 108 (26.34%) were in their third academic year and 129 (31.46%) were between 21-22 years of age. More than 70% of participants showed willingness to volunteer during a pandemic. Their willingness to volunteer was motivated by distance of workplace to home, availability of transportation, being vaccinated, access to health care for self and family if affected, and provision of specialized training. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare administrators and policy makers need to address these factors effectively to ensure the availability of skilled and motivated healthcare providers during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Students, Medical , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Volunteers
15.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 142(12)2022 09 06.
Article in English, Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The working day of Norwegian GPs was turned on its head during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the extreme, ongoing pressure the GP service was under. We conducted a qualitative study of the GPs' perceptions of the challenges they faced and of how they coped during the pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Focus group interviews were conducted with 19 GPs from four medical practices in the county of Innlandet. The interviews were analysed using the systematic text condensation method. RESULTS: The GPs described how they have coped with the extremely challenging demands on them. They expressed an expectation of rapid adaptability, and considered this a fundamental characteristic of the role of the GP. They felt an enormous responsibility for their own patients and that in a time of crisis this responsibility was extended to include the entire population. They saw themselves as an important part of the local authority's public health preparedness, even though they had not reflected on this to any great extent prior to the pandemic. INTERPRETATION: The GP service's adaptability during times of crisis depends on the GPs' strong individual and collective sense of responsibility and their ability to cope. The latter is the GP service's great strength, but it also represents a vulnerability due to the camouflaging of the overburdening of the service. This can lead to local authorities failing to take responsibility for their statutory duties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Attitude of Health Personnel , Focus Groups , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Qualitative Research
16.
Rev. latinoam. enferm. (Online) ; 29: e3448, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2054596

ABSTRACT

Objective: to analyze nurses' attitudes toward death in a hospital context after the critical period of the COVID-19 pandemic in Portugal. Method: this quantitative, descriptive, exploratory study was conducted in a university hospital and addressed 995 nurses. Revised Death Attitude Profile (DAP-R) was used to collect data, which were analyzed using analytical and inferential statistics. Results: the nurses most frequently agreed with the statements concerning the Neutral/Neutrality Acceptance and Fear. Age, marital status, profession, and unit of work influenced the nurses' attitudes toward death. During the critical pandemic period, the nurses providing care to patients with COVID-19 presented the following means: Fear (28.89/±8.521) and Avoidance Acceptance (18.35/±7.116), which were higher than the mean obtained in the Escape Acceptance dimension, with significant differences (p=0.004). Conclusion: the nurses held Fear and Avoidance attitudes, revealing the need to qualify and support Nursing workers to cope with the death of those they provide care and manage pandemics and catastrophes.


Objective: analisar as atitudes dos enfermeiros frente à morte no contexto hospitalar após o período crítico da pandemia por COVID-19 em Portugal. Método: estudo quantitativo, descritivo, exploratório, realizado em um hospital universitário, com a participação de 995 enfermeiros. Para a coleta de dados, utilizou-se a Escala de Avaliação do Perfil de Atitudes acerca da Morte, sendo os dados analisados por meio de estatísticas analítica e inferencial. Resultados: a concordância dos enfermeiros foi mais elevada nas afirmativas relativas às atitudes de Aceitação Neutral/Neutralidade e Medo. A idade, o estado civil, a categoria profissional e a área de trabalho foram variáveis que influenciaram as atitudes face à morte. Durante o período crítico da pandemia, os enfermeiros em atendimento à COVID-19 apresentaram as médias das atitudes Medo (28,89/±8,521) e Evitamento (18,35/±7,116) superiores em relação à atitude Aceitação como Escape, que apresentou diferenças significativas (p=0,004). Conclusão: os enfermeiros adotaram posturas de Medo e Evitamento, o que revela a necessidade de investir-se na qualificação e no apoio dos profissionais de Enfermagem, para o enfrentamento da morte daqueles que cuidam e o manejo das pandemias e catástrofes.


Objetivo: analizar las actitudes de los enfermeros frente a la muerte en el contexto hospitalario después del período crítico de la pandemia por COVID-19 en Portugal. Método: estudio cuantitativo, descriptivo y exploratorio, realizado en un hospital universitario, con la participación de 995 enfermeros. Para la recolección de datos se utilizó la Escala de Evaluación del Perfil de Actitudes acerca de la Muerte. Los datos fueron analizados por medio de la estadística analítica e inferencial. Resultados: la concordancia de los enfermeros fue más elevada en las afirmaciones relativas a las actitudes de Aceptación Neutral/Neutralidad y Miedo. La edad, el estado civil, la categoría profesional y el área de trabajo fueron variables que influenciaron las actitudes frente a la muerte. Durante el período crítico de la pandemia, los enfermeros que atendían el COVID-19 presentaron las medias de las actitudes: Miedo (28,89/ ± 8,521) y Evitación (18,35/ ± 7,116), superiores a las actitudes de Aceptación, como Escape, que presentó diferencias significativas (p=0,004). Conclusión: los enfermeros adoptaron posturas de Miedo y Evitación, lo que revela la necesidad de realizar inversiones en la calificación y en apoyo de los profesionales de Enfermería, a fin de hacer frente a la muerte de quienes cuidan y gestionan las pandemias y los desastres.


Subject(s)
Humans , Portugal/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires , SARS Virus , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
17.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273209, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Proper disaster preparedness by community pharmacists has the potential to counter many of the factors that cause threats and high-risk outcomes. Their preparedness and awareness may also help health practitioners and governments to improve disaster response planning. OBJECTIVES: This aims to explore the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) towards disaster medicine preparedness and readiness among community pharmacists in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted over the ten months among licensed community pharmacists who had three months' professional experience or more. Face-to-face interviews were carried out and a structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Logistic regression models were used to determine the factors influencing aboucine preparedness and readiness. SPSS Version 24 was used to analyze the data collected. RESULTS: A total of 500 community pharmacists participated in the study. The average knowledge score was 25.6% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [21.7%, 29.4%]. Better knowledge scores were observed in the male gender (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.05-3.72), participants aged ≥ 31 years old (OR 2.97; 95% CI 1.16-7.6), postgraduates (OR 4.36; 95% CI 2.6-7.3), participants from independent Pharmacies (OR 6.5; 95% CI 4.04-10.4 3), chief pharmacists (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.86-5.07), participants with 16 years and more experience years (OR 2.42; 95% CI 1.063-5.522) and participants who graduated from regional/international universities (OR 5.92; 95% CI 2.65-13.2). Better attitude and practice about disaster medicine preparedness were observed in postgraduates (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.26-pharmacists from independent pharmacies (OR 1.35; 95% CI 2.43-2,.66), and chief pharmacists (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.17-1.35). CONCLUSIONS: It's essential to provide a continuing education program using different educational strategies urgently needed to improve community pharmacy competencies (e.g. knowledge attitudes, and perceptions) to improve the skills and practices regarding disaster medicine preparedness and readiness.


Subject(s)
Community Pharmacy Services , Disaster Medicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Pharmacists , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates
18.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 80(10): 1575-1576, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041963
19.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e064545, 2022 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the views and experiences of community pharmacists in Northern Ireland (NI) regarding changes in community pharmacy practice/processes in preparation for, and response to, the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone-administered questionnaire. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Geographically stratified representative sample of 130 community pharmacists in NI between March and May 2021. OUTCOME MEASURES: Community pharmacists' responses to questions focusing on their preparation, experience and response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Descriptive analysis was conducted including frequencies and percentages. Free-text comments were summarised using thematic analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty pharmacists completed the questionnaire. Pharmacists responded comprehensively to implementing infection control measures, for example, management of social distancing in the shop (96.2%), making adjustments to premises, for example, barriers/screens (95.4%), while maintaining medicines supply (100.0%) and advice to patients (93.1%). Newly commissioned services were provided, for example, emergency supply service (93.1%), influenza vaccination for healthcare workers (77.7%) and volunteer deliveries to vulnerable people (54.6%). Pharmacists were least prepared for the increased workload and patients' challenging behaviour, but the majority (96.9%) reported that they felt better prepared during the second wave. Pharmacists agreed/strongly agreed that they would be able to re-establish normal services (87.7%), were willing to administer COVID-19 vaccines (80.7%) and provide COVID-19 testing (60.8%) in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Community pharmacists remained accessible and maintained supply of essential medicines and advice to patients throughout the pandemic. Provision of modified and additional services such as vaccination reinforced the clinical and public health role of pharmacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Pharmacy Services , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Northern Ireland/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pharmacists , Professional Role , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273576, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevention and treatment of chronic pain problems in breast cancer follow-up care require an adequate response from healthcare providers. Generally, this involves the uptake of evidence-based principles regarding pain management in everyday practice. However, despite the extensive literature on effective pain interventions, systematic and coordinated follow-up care is lacking for breast cancer survivors with pain problems in Flanders, Belgium. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to gather insight into healthcare providers' perceptions of pain prevention and treatment in breast cancer follow-up care, particularly with attention to the multilevel influences on pain follow-up. METHODS: We conducted four online focus groups with twenty-two healthcare providers from different disciplines such as oncologists, pharmacists, nurses, physiotherapists, and psychologists. Data analysis was guided by the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. This guide is inspired by the constant comparison method, based on Grounded Theory. RESULTS: The identified influencing factors were thematically grouped into four levels: at the level of the individual healthcare provider, in interaction with the patient, in interaction with colleagues, and at the context level. At each level, we distinguished factors related to healthcare providers' perceptions such as awareness, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, experiences, and intentions. For example, because of a lack of knowledge and certain beliefs among healthcare providers, referral to other disciplines often does not happen in the context of pain. CONCLUSION: This study points out the need to explore the prevention and treatment of chronic pain after breast cancer from a multidimensional point of view. This involves not only the characteristics of individual healthcare providers but is also inherently interactional and system-like in nature. This analysis provides opportunities for the development of interventions that target the influencing factors of prevention and treatment of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Chronic Pain , Attitude of Health Personnel , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Chronic Pain/prevention & control , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Qualitative Research
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