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2.
J Clin Epidemiol ; 138: 80-94, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454254

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We investigated systematic review automation tool use by systematic reviewers, health technology assessors and clinical guideline developerst. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: An online, 16-question survey was distributed across several evidence synthesis, health technology assessment and guideline development organizations. We asked the respondents what tools they use and abandon, how often and when do they use the tools, their perceived time savings and accuracy, and desired new tools. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. RESULTS: A total of 253 respondents completed the survey; 89% have used systematic review automation tools - most frequently whilst screening (79%). Respondents' "top 3" tools included: Covidence (45%), RevMan (35%), Rayyan and GRADEPro (both 22%); most commonly abandoned were Rayyan (19%), Covidence (15%), DistillerSR (14%) and RevMan (13%). Tools saved time (80%) and increased accuracy (54%). Respondents taught themselves to how to use the tools (72%); lack of knowledge was the most frequent barrier to tool adoption (51%). New tool development was suggested for the searching and data extraction stages. CONCLUSION: Automation tools will likely have an increasingly important role in high-quality and timely reviews. Further work is required in training and dissemination of automation tools and ensuring they meet the desirable features of those conducting systematic reviews.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Automation/methods , Research Personnel/psychology , Systematic Reviews as Topic/methods , Technology Assessment, Biomedical/statistics & numerical data , Technology Assessment, Biomedical/standards , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
3.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(11): 3051-3057, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of using information and communication technology (ICT) to address daily and healthcare needs. The barriers for older adults in the United States to learn a new technology to go online during the pandemic remain to be studied. METHODS: Using data from the 2019-2020 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), a nationally representative survey of older Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older in the United States, we used multivariable logistic regression models to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with learning a new technology to go online during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Our sample represented 23,547,688 older adults nationally, of which the majority (60.2%) increased ICT use during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, most older adults (71.8%) did not report learning a new technology to go online. Those who did not learn a new technology to go online had less of an increase in ICT use than those who learned either with help or by themselves (50.7% vs. 78.4% or 89.2% respectively, p < 0.01). The odds of learning a new technology decreased with increasing age (aOR [95%CI] = 0.96 [0.94-0.98]), being male (aOR [95%CI] = 0.56 [0.45-0.72]), having lower than high school educational attainment (aOR [95%CI] = 0.38 [0.29-0.50]), decreasing income levels (aORs ranged from 0.28 to 0.54), and self-reported fair or poor general health (aOR [95%CI] = 0.65 [0.47-0.90]). CONCLUSION: The identified sociodemographic and clinical factors could inform targeted intervention strategies to improve ICT use among older adults during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic and in the future.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Communication Barriers , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , Information Technology/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Attitude to Health , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , United States
4.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(4): 344-347, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221531

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We report a survey in regional Queensland to understand the reasons for suboptimal uptake of the COVIDSafe app. METHODS: A short five-minute electronic survey disseminated to healthcare professionals, mining groups and school communities in the Central Queensland region. Free text responses and their topics were modelled using natural language processing and a latent Dirichlet model. RESULTS: We received a total of 723 responses; of these, 69% had downloaded the app and 31% had not. The respondents' reasons for not downloading the app were grouped under four topics: lack of perceived risk of COVID-19/lack of perceived need and privacy issues; phone-related issues; tracking and misuse of data; and trust, security and credibility. Among the 472 people who downloaded the app and provided text amenable to text mining, the two topics most commonly listed were: to assist with contact tracing; and to return to normal. CONCLUSIONS: This survey of a regional population found that lack of perceived need, concerns around privacy and technical difficulties were the major barriers to users downloading the application. Implications for public health: Health promotion campaigns aimed at increasing the uptake of the COVIDSafe app should focus on promoting how the app will assist with contact tracing to help return to 'normal'. Additionally, health promotors should address the app's impacts on privacy, people's lack of perceived need for the app and technical barriers.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , COVID-19/prevention & control , Confidentiality/psychology , Data Accuracy , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Preventive Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Queensland , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Urol Int ; 105(7-8): 650-656, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216840

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the use and concern of telemedicine among German urologists, and thus, there are no established guidelines for telemedical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of urological indications. METHODS: An anonymized survey was conducted among German private practice urologists during the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The χ2 test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: 257 urologists were included in the final analysis. Thirty-five (14.0%) of urologists had used telemedicine as part of their consultation, and 221 (86.0%) had not used telemedicine. There was no difference between telemedicine adoption rates between rural and urban settings. Telemedicine users were significantly more satisfied with the information they had received regarding telemedicine issues. Users saw the greatest barrier to telemedicine that patients do not take up the offer of telemedicine. Nonusers were most concerned with unclear indications for telemedicine followed by lesser reimbursements during telemedicine than in-person visitations. Users were significantly more likely to use telemedicine beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Urologists, who wanted to use the service in the future, wanted an active support by the German society of urology and guidelines for telemedicine. Last, users and nonusers preferred telemedicine for non-acute chronic diseases and follow-up visitations. CONCLUSION: Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine remains a rarely used service among German private practice urologists. Ultimately, to overcome the current challenges, urologists require an active support for the service through the German Society of Urology and telemedical guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Private Practice/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologists/trends , Urology/trends , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Germany , Health Care Surveys , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Middle Aged , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis
7.
ESMO Open ; 6(2): 100104, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all aspects of modern-day oncology, including how stakeholders communicate through social media. We surveyed oncology stakeholders in order to assess their attitudes pertaining to social media and how it has been affected during the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 40-item survey was distributed to stakeholders from 8 July to 22 July 2020 and was promoted through the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the OncoAlert Network. RESULTS: One thousand and seventy-six physicians and stakeholders took part in the survey. In total, 57.3% of respondents were medical oncologists, 50.6% aged <40 years, 50.8% of female gender and mostly practicing in Europe (51.5%). More than 90% of respondents considered social media a useful tool for distributing scientific information and for education. Most used social media to stay up to date on cancer care in general (62.5%) and cancer care during COVID-19 (61%) given the constant flow of information. Respondents also used social media to interact with other oncologists (78.8%) and with patients (34.4%). Overall, 61.1% of respondents were satisfied with the role that social media was playing during the COVID-19 pandemic. On the other hand, 41.1% of respondents reported trouble in discriminating between credible and less credible information and 30% stated social networks were a source of stress. For this reason, one-third of respondents reduced its use during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regarding meeting attendance, a total of 59.1% of responding physicians preferred in-person meetings to virtual ones, and 51.8% agreed that virtual meetings and social distancing could hamper effective collaboration. CONCLUSION: Social media has a useful role in supporting cancer care and professional engagement in oncology. Although one-third of respondents reported reduced use of social media due to stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority found social media useful to keep up to date and were satisfied with the role social media was playing during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oncologists , Social Media , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Female , Humans , Information Dissemination , Male , Medical Oncology/education , Middle Aged , Oncologists/psychology , Social Networking , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
8.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 28(1)2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147326

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telehealth became the most practical option for general practice consultations in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) as a result of the national lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. What is the consumer experience of access to telehealth and how do consumers and providers perceive this mode of care delivery going forward? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A national survey of general practice consumers and providers who used telehealth services since the national lockdowns in 2020 will be distributed. It is based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology framework of technology acceptance and the access to care framework. The data will be statistically analysed to create a foundation for in-depth research on the use of telehealth services in NZ general practice services, with a specific focus on consumer experiences and health outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was granted by the Auckland Health Research Ethics Committee on 13/11/2020, reference AH2539. The survey will be disseminated online.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , General Practice/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Attitude to Computers , Humans , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Videoconferencing
9.
Curationis ; 44(1): e1-e7, 2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The real-world problems and ever-changing challenges currently confronting the future of nursing education and healthcare require a problem-based learning approach using simulation strategy. This is exacerbated by the increasing burden of diseases such as tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV and AIDS) and more recently the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, as well as advancing technology and changing regulations and policies. Problem-based learning is a student-centred learning strategy, where students are presented with situations drawn from practice, which can be used to bridge the theory-practice gap. OBJECTIVES: To explore the perceptions and views of healthcare educators on how problem-based learning can be facilitated through simulation. METHOD: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Thirteen educators from the Faculty of Health Sciences of the University of Johannesburg, with 5 years' teaching experience, were purposively selected from the Dean's office, the Nursing Department, emergency medical care and the departments of podiatry, somatology and radiography. The participants were selected based on their extensive knowledge of problem-based learning and the use of simulation. Data were collected through in-depth, individual, semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis provided six themes and 13 related sub-themes. The article focuses on the perceptions and views of educators regarding problem-based learning through simulation. RESULTS: Problem-based learning through simulation allows students to work together in teams, which demonstrates a new modus operandi and renders a holistic approach to patient care. CONCLUSION: Problem-based learning through simulation should be utilised to encourage reflective knowledge exchange. Students from various departments can learn about new innovations, creativity and develop critical thinking when solving complex health-related problems.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Faculty, Nursing/psychology , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Adult , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Young Adult
10.
Nurs Forum ; 56(3): 612-618, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a sudden transition to remote learning. These circumstances presented many challenges for higher education faculty and students around the world but especially for nursing education programs which are traditionally conducted in a face-to-face learning environment that includes hands-on experiential learning. METHODS: Guided by Meleis' Transition Theory, a qualitative descriptive design was utilized to explore prelicensure nursing students' experiences of the transition to remote learning during the Spring 2020 semester. Participants were recruited from one baccalaureate program in the Pacific Northwestern United States. Interviews were conducted and transcribed using a web conferencing platform. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological reduction. RESULTS: Eleven students participated. Interviews revealed four overarching themes: technological challenges, academic relationship changes, role stress and strain, and resilience. CONCLUSION: The sudden transition to remote learning resulted in a number of challenges for nursing students. Despite these challenges, students demonstrated a remarkable sense of resilience and perseverance. Faculty have an opportunity to address student stressors and design remote courses in such a way to facilitate student engagement and community building.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Attitude to Computers , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Stress, Psychological , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
12.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 73(7): 998-1003, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1017881

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the experience, views, and opinions of rheumatology providers at Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities about rheumatic disease health care issues during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We performed an anonymized cross-sectional survey, conducted from April 16 to May 18, 2020, of VA rheumatology providers. We assessed provider perspectives on COVID-19 issues and resilience. RESULTS: Of the 153 eligible VA rheumatologists, 103 (67%) completed the survey. A significant proportion of providers reported a ≥50% increase related to COVID-19 in visits by telephone (53%), video-based VA video connect (VVC; 44%), and clinical video telehealth with a facilitator (29%). A majority of the responders were somewhat or very comfortable with technology for providing health care to established patients during the COVID-19 pandemic using telephone (87%), VVC (64%), and in-person visits (54%). A smaller proportion were comfortable with technology providing health care to new patients. At least 65% of rheumatologists considered telephone visits appropriate for established patients with gout, osteoporosis, polymyalgia rheumatica, stable rheumatoid arthritis, stable spondyloarthritis, or osteoarthritis; 32% reported a rheumatology medication shortage. Adjusted for age, sex, and ethnicity, high provider resilience was associated with significantly higher odds ratios (ORs) of comfort with technology for telephone (OR 3.1 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-9.7]) and VVC visits for new patients (OR 4.7 [95% CI 1.4-15.7]). CONCLUSION: A better understanding of COVID-19 rheumatic disease health care issues using a health-system approach can better inform providers, improve provider satisfaction, and have positive effects on the care of veterans with rheumatic disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Rheumatic Diseases/therapy , Rheumatologists/trends , Rheumatology/trends , Telemedicine/trends , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/trends , Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Rheumatic Diseases/diagnosis , Time Factors , United States
14.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 22(1): 18, 2021 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Like with all cancers, multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are the norm in bone and soft tissue tumour (BST) management too. Problem in attendance of specialists due to geographical location is the one of the key barriers to effective functioning of MDTs. To overcome this problem, virtual MDTs involving videoconferencing or telemedicine have been proposed, but however this has been seldom used and tested. The COVID-19 pandemic forced the implementation of virtual MDTs in the Oxford sarcoma service in order to maintain normal service provision. We conducted a survey among the participants to evaluate its efficacy. METHODS: An online questionnaire comprising of 24 questions organised into 4 sections was circulated among all participants of the MDT after completion of 8 virtual MDTs. Opinions were sought comparing virtual MDTs to the conventional face-to-face MDTs on various aspects. A total of 36 responses were received and were evaluated. RESULTS: 72.8% were satisfied with the depth of discussion in virtual MDTs and 83.3% felt that the decision-making in diagnosis had not changed following the switch from face-to-face MDTs. About 86% reported to have all essential patient data was available to make decisions and 88.9% were satisfied with the time for discussion of patient issues over virtual platform. Three-fourths of the participants were satisfied (36.1% - highly satisfied; 38.9% - moderately satisfied) with virtual MDTs and 55.6% of them were happy to attend MDTs only by the virtual platform in the future. Regarding future, 77.8% of the participants opined that virtual MDTs would be the future of cancer care and an overwhelming majority (91.7%) felt that the present exercise would serve as a precursor to global MDTs involving specialists from abroad in the future. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that the forced switch to virtual MDTs in sarcoma care following the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic to be a viable and effective alternative to conventional face-to-face MDTs. With effective and efficient software in place, virtual MDTs would also facilitate in forming extended MDTs in seeking opinions on complex cases from specialists abroad and can expand cancer care globally.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Interdisciplinary Communication , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Muscle Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Sarcoma/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Bone Neoplasms/diagnosis , Clinical Decision-Making , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Muscle Neoplasms/diagnosis , Sarcoma/diagnosis , Tertiary Care Centers
16.
J Psycholinguist Res ; 50(4): 883-900, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1008106

ABSTRACT

The study uses technology acceptance model (TAM) to gain insights into user reactions to the technology adopted for language learning. The study aims to analyze the correlation between the variables of TAM on using Zoom application in language learning, in addition to examining how gender and experience influence the use of technology. The participants of this study comprise of 75 undergraduate English-as-Foreign-Language learners who have studied for their courses online during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the study reveal a strong positive correlation between the actual use of Zoom and the students' attitudes and behavioral intention. In addition, there is a positive correlation between computer self-efficacy and other variables (i.e. PU, actual use, PEU, attitude and behavioral intention). Further, while the results reveal that there is no correlation between the gender and any variables of the model, it has been found that experience is positively correlated with the variables of TAM.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Education, Distance , Language , Models, Educational , Students/psychology , Technology , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , Self Efficacy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
17.
JAMA Cardiol ; 5(10): 1089-1090, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963360
18.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 39(4): 399-405, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883005

ABSTRACT

When COVID-19 was recognized as a global pandemic and offices, clinics, and academic centers closed in the spring of 2020, many librarians found themselves answering reference questions, teaching, meeting, facilitating access to information resources, and organizing resources remotely. In the transition from traditional offices and workspaces to work from home, librarians and their administrations faced many challenges and adapted to a variety of new technologies. Video-conferencing and phone-forwarding tools were being used in new ways or for the first time. Instead of addressing technology that librarians adopted or adapted in greater numbers during the global pandemic, this column will examine an attitude of care and approach to technology called "compassionate computing" that helped ease the transition to work from home during an unprecedented time.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Empathy , Librarians/psychology , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Library Services/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
20.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(1): 3-13, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760421

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with several short- and long-term negative impacts on the well-being of older adults. Physical distancing recommendations to reduce transmission of the SARS-CoV2-19 virus increase the risk of social isolation and loneliness, which are associated with negative outcomes including anxiety, depression, cognitive decline, and mortality. Taken together, social isolation and additional psychological impacts of the pandemic (e.g., worry, grief) underscore the importance of intervention efforts to older adults. This narrative review draws upon a wide range of evidence to provide a comprehensive overview of appropriate remotely-delivered interventions for older adults that target loneliness and psychological symptoms. These include interventions delivered by a range of individuals (i.e., community members to mental health professionals), and interventions that vary by implementation (e.g., self-guided therapy, remotely-delivered interventions via telephone or video call). Recommendations to overcome barriers to implementation and delivery are provided, with consideration given to the different living situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Psychological Distress , Social Isolation/psychology , Telecommunications , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Assisted Living Facilities , Attitude to Computers , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Depression/etiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Independent Living , Loneliness/psychology , Nursing Homes , Physical Distancing , Privacy , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media
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