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1.
Span J Psychol ; 24: e13, 2021 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096600

ABSTRACT

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the consequences of conspiracy theories and the COVID-19 pandemic raised this interest to another level. In this article, I will outline what we know about the consequences of conspiracy theories for individuals, groups, and society, arguing that they are certainly not harmless. In particular, research suggests that conspiracy theories are associated with political apathy, support for non-normative political action, climate denial, vaccine refusal, prejudice, crime, violence, disengagement in the workplace, and reluctance to adhere to COVID-19 recommendations. In this article, I will also discuss the challenges of dealing with the negative consequences of conspiracy theories, which present some opportunities for future research.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Health Behavior , Politics , Prejudice , Vaccination Refusal , Apathy , Attitude , Climate Change , Crime , Culture , Denial, Psychological , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Personnel Loyalty , SARS-CoV-2 , Violence
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066011

ABSTRACT

Mental health attitude has huge impacts on the improvement of mental health. In response to the ongoing damage the COVID-19 pandemic caused to the mental health of the Chinese people, this study aims to explore the factors associated with mental health attitude in China. To this end, we extract the key topics in mental health-related microblogs on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, using the structural topic modeling (STM) approach. An interaction term of sentiment polarity and time is put into the STM model to track the evolution of public sentiment towards the key topics over time. Through an in-depth analysis of 146,625 Weibo posts, this study captures 12 topics that are, in turn, classified into four factors as stigma (n = 54,559, 37.21%), mental health literacy (n = 32,199, 21.96%), public promotion (n = 30,747, 20.97%), and social support (n = 29,120, 19.86%). The results show that stigma is the primary factor inducing negative mental health attitudes in China as none of the topics related to this factor are considered positive. Mental health literacy, public promotion, and social support are the factors that could enhance positive attitudes towards mental health, since most of the topics related to these factors are identified as positive ones. The provision of tailored strategies for each of these factors could potentially improve the mental health attitudes of the Chinese people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Attitude , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
3.
Public Health ; 211: 144-148, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031640

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to assess the determinants of willingness to pay to enhance pandemic preparedness in Mauritius. STUDY DESIGN: A contingent valuation method is used to estimate willingness to pay to pay for enhancing pandemic preparedness using a sample of working people in Mauritius. METHODS: A two-phase decision process analysis is carried out to model the willingness to pay to enhance pandemic preparedness. The first phase is to analyse the respondents' decision of whether or not to pay for enhancing pandemic preparedness using a Probit model. The second phase is to estimate the determinants of the amount of money respondents are willing to pay using a Tobit model. RESULTS: Income earners are willing to pay an average of Rs. 1,900 (approximately USD 50) per annum to enhance pandemic preparedness. 'Perceived Response Efficacy', 'Awareness of the Need and Responsibility for Paying', 'Subjective Obligation to Pay' and the 'Theory of Planned Behaviour' are found to affect both stages of of the decision-making process. Knowledge on COVID-19 is found to have a positive impact on the decision to pay and health responsibility attitude is found to have a negative impact on the amount people are willing to pay. CONCLUSIONS: On average, the government can potentially expect to mobilise an additional Rs. 1,047,470,000 (USD 27,565,000) from taxpayers to spend on enhancing pandemic preparedness in Mauritius. To increase willingness to pay for enhanced pandemic preparedness, the government can focus on improving knowledge on a pandemic, perceived response efficacy and awareness on need and responsibility of paying.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Income , Mauritius , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 33(3): 1198-1214, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021449

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use surged during COVID-19, and a significant amount of recent research has relied solely on online surveys to assess patient perceptions. However, these surveys may be biased since they require an internet connection and digital literacy skills. We compare local perceptions of telemedicine visits in rural areas across two methods of data collection: online-only vs. paper surveys. We collected 100 paper and 108 online surveys in two rural counties with a total population of 10,000. The results show that significant differences exist in the demographics of people completing each type of survey and in the perceptions of telemedicine, with paper-based respondents generally demonstrating a higher degree of confidence in telemedicine. Ordered logistic regressions controlling for potentially influential underlying demographic characteristics (income, hours worked, and presence of children) show that paper-based respondents tend to have higher opinions of telemedicine, but that overall levels of comfort are similar across survey types.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Paper , Reproducibility of Results , Rural Population
6.
Health Expect ; 25(4): 1703-1716, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961579

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is limited research exploring how smoking cessation treatment should be implemented into lung cancer screening in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to understand attitudes and preferences regarding the integration of smoking cessation support within lung cancer screening from the perspective of those eligible. METHODS: Thirty-one lung cancer screening eligible individuals aged 55-80 years with current or former smoking histories were recruited using community outreach and social media. Two focus groups (three participants each) and 25 individual telephone interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using the framework approach to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three themes were generated: (1) bringing lung cancer closer to home, where screening was viewed as providing an opportunity to motivate smoking cessation, depending on perceived personal risk and screening result; (2) a sensitive approach to cessation with the uptake of cessation support considered to be largely dependent on screening practitioners' communication style and expectations of stigma and (3) creating an equitable service that focuses on ease of access as a key determinant of uptake, where integrating cessation within the screening appointment may sustain increased quit motivation and prevent loss to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The integration of smoking cessation into lung cancer screening was viewed positively by those eligible to attend. Screening appointments providing personalized lung health information may increase cessation motivation. Services should proactively support participants with possible fatalistic views regarding risk and decreased cessation motivation upon receiving a good screening result. To increase engagement in cessation, services need to be person-centred. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: This study has included patient and public involvement throughout, including input regarding study design, research materials, recruitment strategies and research summaries.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , Early Detection of Cancer , Lung Neoplasms , Smoking Cessation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude , Early Detection of Cancer/psychology , Focus Groups , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/psychology , Middle Aged , Motivation , Qualitative Research , Smoking Cessation/psychology , United Kingdom
7.
ANS Adv Nurs Sci ; 44(3): 183-194, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961172

ABSTRACT

In this article, we apply Agamben's theory of biopower and other related concepts to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. We explore the similarities between the COVID-19 pandemic and the pandemic of racism. Concepts such as bios, zoe, homo sacer, and states of exception can be applied to understand inequities among marginalized communities in the COVID-19 pandemic. We recommend that nurses and health care workers use critical conscientization and structural competency to increase awareness and develop interventions to undo the injustices related to biopower faced by many in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Status Disparities , Racism/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Public Health , Racism/psychology , Social Environment , United States
8.
Public Health Rep ; 137(5): 832-840, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938155

ABSTRACT

Engaging communities is a key strategy to increase COVID-19 vaccination. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence Rapid Community Assessment Guide was developed for community partners to obtain insights about barriers to COVID-19 vaccine uptake and to engage community partners in designing interventions to build vaccine confidence. In spring 2021, 3 CDC teams were deployed to Alabama and Georgia to conduct a rapid community assessment in selected jurisdictions. Data collection included interviews, listening sessions, observations, and street intercept surveys. We identified 3 facilitators and barriers to vaccine uptake: (1) planning and coordination, (2) capacity and implementation, and (3) attitudes and beliefs. We found that the use of the rapid community assessment in Alabama and Georgia was feasible to implement, useful in eliciting unique community concerns and dispelling assumptions, and useful in informing intervention strategies. Our results underscore the importance of community engagement in COVID-19 mitigation strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Alabama/epidemiology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Community Participation , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans
9.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(9): 3351-3360, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856621

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to compare the oral health attitudes and behaviors of medical and dental students/interns during the Corona pandemic in Saudi Arabia using Hiroshima University Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the oral health attitudes and behaviors of dental and medical students/interns in Saudi Arabia using an online Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HUDBI). An English version of the questionnaires consisting of personal information and 20 HUDBI items were responded by the 638 (46.8%) dental and 726 (53.2%) medical students/interns. The mean score of oral health attitude and behavior of the study participants was calculated based on 12 point scale of the HUDBI items. The Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests compared the HUDBI scores across different groups. RESULTS: The study sample's overall mean HUDBI score was 6.44±1.80 (Median 7). Dental students/interns (825.60) demonstrated a significantly higher HUDBI mean score than medical students/interns (556.75) (p<0.001). Similarly, female students (712.25) than the male students (712.25 vs. 642, p=0.001), and those studying in private universities compared to government universities (741.56 vs. 673.52, p=0.028) showed significantly higher HUDBI mean scores. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, dental students/interns displayed a better oral health attitudes and behaviors than medical students/interns. Therefore, oral health promotion programs aimed at medical and dental students/interns are essential for improving oral health attitudes and behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Oral Health , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 830933, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834648

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic is fueling digital health transformation-accelerating innovations of digital health services, surveillance, and interventions, whereas hastening social contagion of deliberate infodemic. The USA and many other countries are experiencing a resurgent wave of the COVID-19 pandemic with vaccination rate slowdown, making policymaking fraught with challenges. Political leaders and scientists have publicly warned of a "pandemic of the unvaccinated," reinforcing their calls for citizens to get jabs. However, some scientists accused elites of stigmatizing the unvaccinated people and undermining the moral pillars of public health. Following the PRISMA-ScR guidelines, we first reviewed the nuances of stakeholders involved in the ongoing debates and revealed the potential consequences of divisive pronouncements to provide perspectives to reframe extensible discussions. Then, we employed the convergent cross mapping (CCM) model to reveal the uncharted knock-on effects of the contentious tsunami in a stakeholders-oriented policymaking framework, coupled with rich metadata from the GDELT project and Google Trends. Our experimental findings suggest that current news coverage may shape the mindsets of the vaccines against the unvaccinated, thereby exacerbating the risk of dualistic antagonism in algorithmically infused societies. Finally, we briefly summarized how open debates are conducive to increasing vaccination rates and bolstering the outcomes of impending policies for pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Mass Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Opinion
11.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264633, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793512

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In low-income countries, vaccination campaigns are lagging, and evidence on vaccine acceptance, a crucial public health planning input, remains scant. This is the first study that reports willingness to take COVID-19 vaccines and its socio-demographic correlates in Ethiopia, Africa's second most populous country. METHODS: The analysis is based on a nationally representative survey data of 2,317 households conducted in the informal economy in November 2020. It employs two logistic regression models where the two outcome variables are (i) a household head's willingness to take a COVID-19 vaccine or not, and (ii) if yes if they would also hypothetically pay (an unspecified amount) for it or not. Predictors include age, gender, education, marital status, income category, health insurance coverage, sickness due to COVID-19, chronic illness, trust in government, prior participation in voluntary activities, urban residence. RESULTS: Willingness to take the vaccine was high (88%) and significantly associated with COVID-19 cases in the family, trust in government and pro-social behavior. All other predictors such as gender, education, income, health insurance, chronic illness, urban residence did not significantly predict vaccine willingness at the 5% level. Among those willing to take the vaccine, 33% also answered that they would hypothetically pay (an unspecified amount) for it, an answer that is significantly associated with trust in government, health insurance coverage and income. CONCLUSION: The results highlight both opportunities and challenges. There is little evidence of vaccine hesitancy in Ethiopia among household heads operating in the informal economy. The role played by trust in government and pro-social behavior in motivating this outcome suggests that policy makers need to consider these factors in the planning of COVID-19 vaccine campaigns in order to foster vaccine uptake. At the same time, as the willingness to hypothetically pay for a COVID-19 vaccine seems to be small, fairly-priced vaccines along with financial support are also needed to ensure further uptake of COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunization Programs , Income/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Participation/psychology , Patient Participation/statistics & numerical data , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination , /statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265807, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759962

ABSTRACT

Lifestyle physical activity following spinal cord injury (SCI) is critical for functional independence, mental wellness, and social participation, yet nearly 50% of individuals with SCI report no regular exercise. The objective of this study was to better understand factors leading to this participation gap by capturing the physical activity perspectives of individuals living with SCI. We completed small group interviews with nine individuals living with SCI across the United States. Iterative thematic analysis systematically revealed meaningful core concepts related to physical activity engagement with SCI. Emergent themes revealed challenges to lifestyle physical activity behavior including gaps in physical activity education, isolation during psychological adjustment, and knowledge limitations in community exercise settings. A secondary theme related to the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, highlighting additional environmental constraints affecting participation. Our findings suggest that most physical activity education is delivered during inpatient rehabilitation and is related to physical function. Lifetime physical activity strategies are achieved through self-education and peer networking. Personal motivators for physical activity include secondary condition prevention, while social and emotional barriers prevent regular adherence. These findings can inform the development and delivery of physical activity programs to maximize physical activity engagement in individuals living with chronic SCI.


Subject(s)
Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Adult , Aged , Attitude to Health , Emotional Adjustment , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Spinal Cord Injuries/psychology , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy
13.
Epidemiol Infect ; 150: e54, 2022 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1721344

ABSTRACT

The motivations that govern the adoption of digital contact tracing (DCT) tools are complex and not well understood. Hence, we assessed the factors influencing the acceptance and adoption of Singapore's national DCT tool - TraceTogether - during the COVID-19 pandemic. We surveyed 3943 visitors of Tan Tock Seng Hospital from July 2020 to February 2021 and stratified the analyses into three cohorts. Each cohort was stratified based on the time when significant policy interventions were introduced to increase the adoption of TraceTogether. Binary logistic regression was preceded by principal components analysis to reduce the Likert items. Respondents who 'perceived TraceTogether as useful and necessary' had higher likelihood of accepting it but those with 'Concerns about personal data collected by TraceTogether' had lower likelihood of accepting and adopting the tool. The injunctive and descriptive social norms were also positively associated with both the acceptance and adoption of the tool. Liberal individualism was mixed in the population and negatively associated with the acceptance and adoption of TraceTogether. Policy measures to increase the uptake of a national DCT bridged the digital divide and accelerated its adoption. However, good public communications are crucial to address the barriers of acceptance to improve voluntary uptake widespread adoption.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , Contact Tracing/instrumentation , Digital Technology/instrumentation , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Social Norms , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
PLoS Med ; 19(3): e1003907, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714705

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the United Kingdom government imposed public health policies in England to reduce social contacts in hopes of curbing virus transmission. We conducted a repeated cross-sectional study to measure contact patterns weekly from March 2020 to March 2021 to estimate the impact of these policies, covering 3 national lockdowns interspersed by periods of less restrictive policies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The repeated cross-sectional survey data were collected using online surveys of representative samples of the UK population by age and gender. Survey participants were recruited by the online market research company Ipsos MORI through internet-based banner and social media ads and email campaigns. The participant data used for this analysis are restricted to those who reported living in England. We calculated the mean daily contacts reported using a (clustered) bootstrap and fitted a censored negative binomial model to estimate age-stratified contact matrices and estimate proportional changes to the basic reproduction number under controlled conditions using the change in contacts as a scaling factor. To put the findings in perspective, we discuss contact rates recorded throughout the year in terms of previously recorded rates from the POLYMOD study social contact study. The survey recorded 101,350 observations from 19,914 participants who reported 466,710 contacts over 53 weeks. We observed changes in social contact patterns in England over time and by participants' age, personal risk factors, and perception of risk. The mean reported contacts for adults 18 to 59 years old ranged between 2.39 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.20 to 2.60) contacts and 4.93 (95% CI 4.65 to 5.19) contacts during the study period. The mean contacts for school-age children (5 to 17 years old) ranged from 3.07 (95% CI 2.89 to 3.27) to 15.11 (95% CI 13.87 to 16.41). This demonstrates a sustained decrease in social contacts compared to a mean of 11.08 (95% CI 10.54 to 11.57) contacts per participant in all age groups combined as measured by the POLYMOD social contact study in 2005 to 2006. Contacts measured during periods of lockdowns were lower than in periods of eased social restrictions. The use of face coverings outside the home has remained high since the government mandated use in some settings in July 2020. The main limitations of this analysis are the potential for selection bias, as participants are recruited through internet-based campaigns, and recall bias, in which participants may under- or overreport the number of contacts they have made. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we observed that recorded contacts reduced dramatically compared to prepandemic levels (as measured in the POLYMOD study), with changes in reported contacts correlated with government interventions throughout the pandemic. Despite easing of restrictions in the summer of 2020, the mean number of reported contacts only returned to about half of that observed prepandemic at its highest recorded level. The CoMix survey provides a unique repeated cross-sectional data set for a full year in England, from the first day of the first lockdown, for use in statistical analyses and mathematical modelling of COVID-19 and other diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Social Interaction , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , England , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Psychological , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Ann Ig ; 34(6): 650-655, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675178

ABSTRACT

Abstract: On February 9, 2021, the Italian Ministry of Health made the "Covid-19 vaccine AstraZeneca" (now "Vaxzevria") available for use in the anti-COVID-19 vaccination campaign. However, in early March, the media reported that five people died a few days after receiving the vaccine. The reaction among both those already vaccinated and the vaccine candidates was one of near panic. The subsequent events have had long-lasting consequences, as 10-20% of vaccine candidates have since refused vaccination with the AstraZeneca vac-cine, so in addition to the delay in vaccination, ~200,000 doses of it were not administered. The goal of the vaccination campaign in Italy, when operating at full capacity, was to administer 500,000 doses per day, for a total of 3,500,000 doses per week. In this large amount of people, it is statistically certain that a certain number of subjects will develop non-vaccine related health problems or even die from causes unrelated to having been vaccinated. At this time in history, press reports must be inspired by a strong sense of responsibility and awareness of the potential consequences of misinformation; this is particularly true, especially because also the social media get inevitably involved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Mass Media , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Immunization Programs , Public Health , Vaccination
17.
Nat Hum Behav ; 6(2): 236-243, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671566

ABSTRACT

Widespread misperceptions about COVID-19 and the novel coronavirus threaten to exacerbate the severity of the pandemic. We conducted preregistered survey experiments in the United States, Great Britain and Canada examining the effectiveness of fact-checks that seek to correct these false or unsupported beliefs. Across three countries with differing levels of political conflict over the pandemic response, we demonstrate that fact-checks reduce targeted misperceptions, especially among the groups who are most vulnerable to these claims, and have minimal spillover effects on the accuracy of related beliefs. However, these reductions in COVID-19 misperception beliefs do not persist over time in panel data even after repeated exposure. These results suggest that fact-checks can successfully change the COVID-19 beliefs of the people who would benefit from them most but that their effects are ephemeral.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Culture , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Perception/psychology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Canada/epidemiology , Ethnopsychology , Female , Humans , Male , Psychology, Social/methods , Psychology, Social/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/ethics , Social Media , United Kingdom/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
18.
Nat Hum Behav ; 5(11): 1528-1534, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598409

ABSTRACT

While scholarly attention to date has focused almost entirely on individual-level drivers of vaccine confidence, we show that macro-level factors play an important role in understanding individual propensity to be confident about vaccination. We analyse data from the 2018 Wellcome Global Monitor survey covering over 120,000 respondents in 126 countries to assess how societal-level trust in science is related to vaccine confidence. In countries with a high aggregate level of trust in science, people are more likely to be confident about vaccination, over and above their individual-level scientific trust. Additionally, we show that societal consensus around trust in science moderates these individual-level and country-level relationships. In countries with a high level of consensus regarding the trustworthiness of science and scientists, the positive correlation between trust in science and vaccine confidence is stronger than it is in comparable countries where the level of social consensus is weaker.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , Consensus , Science , Trust , Vaccines/therapeutic use , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust/psychology , /psychology
20.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(49): e339, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is affecting people at any age and there is limited information about the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on quality of life (QoL) in adolescents with asthma. In the present study, it was aimed to assess the attitudes of adolescents with asthma toward the COVID-19 pandemic and determine the effects of the pandemic on their QoL. METHODS: In total, 125 adolescents with asthma and 98 healthy adolescents participated in the present study. The questionnaire form consisted of three parts. In the first part, all the participants were asked whether they complied with the protective measures against COVID-19. The second part included questions for measuring the participants' level of concern about COVID-19, while the third part consisted of EUROHIS-QOL 8. RESULTS: The patient and control groups were similar in terms of the female/male ratio (55/70 and 48/50, respectively) and mean participant age (14.6 ± 2 and 15.1 ± 1.65 years, respectively) (P = 0.459 and P = 0.062, respectively). The prevalence of COVID-19 in the patients (n = 2, 1.6%) was lower than that in the controls (n = 6, 6.1%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.142). The total EUROHIS-QOL score was significantly lower in the patients (31.2 ± 6.7) than in the controls (33.7 ± 4.4) (P < 0.001). The total QoL scores of asthmatic adolescents without other allergic disease (31.4 ± 6.7) was also lower than those of the controls (33.7 ± 4.4) (P = 0.009). Treatment disruption was significantly more common in patients who received subcutaneous immunotherapy (n = 20, 48.8%) than in those who did not (n = 8, 9.5%) (P < 0.001). Moreover, the patients had lower EUROHIS-QOL scores in the overall QoL, general health, finance, and home domains. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that the mean QoL score of asthmatic adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic is lower than in the healthy population. Disruption in their treatment was most common in patients with asthma who were receiving subcutaneous immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , Asthma/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Asthma/complications , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life , Quarantine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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