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1.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 8548, 2023 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245182

ABSTRACT

This retrospective study evaluated temporal and regional trends of patient admissions to hospitals, intensive care units (ICU), and intermediate care units (IMCU) as well as outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic in Austria. We analysed anonymous data from patients admitted to Austrian hospitals with COVID-19 between January 1st, 2020 and December 31st, 2021. We performed descriptive analyses and logistic regression analyses for in-hospital mortality, IMCU or ICU admission, and in-hospital mortality following ICU admission. 68,193 patients were included, 8304 (12.3%) were primarily admitted to ICU, 3592 (5.3%) to IMCU. Hospital mortality was 17.3%; risk factors were male sex (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.60-1.75, p < 0.001) and high age (OR 7.86, 95% CI 7.07-8.74, p < 0.001 for 90+ vs. 60-64 years). Mortality was higher in the first half of 2020 (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04-1.27, p = 0.01) and the second half of 2021 (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.17, p < 0.001) compared to the second half of 2020 and differed regionally. ICU or IMCU admission was most likely between 55 and 74 years, and less likely in younger and older age groups. We find mortality in Austrian COVID-19-patients to be almost linearly associated with age, ICU admission to be less likely in older individuals, and outcomes to differ between regions and over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Aged , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Austria/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Intensive Care Units , Hospitals , Hospital Mortality
2.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7896, 2023 05 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323386

ABSTRACT

The causative agent of the ongoing Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has acquired a considerable amount of mutations, leading to changes in clinical manifestations and increased transmission. Recent studies based on animal disease models and data from the general population were reporting a higher pathogenicity of the BA.2 sublineage compared to BA.1. The aim of this study was to provide real world data on patients with the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron BA.1 and BA.2 subvariants treated at our center, highlighting similarities and differences in the clinical disease course. We retrospectively collected and analyzed the data of adult patients admitted with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection at the Department for Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Klinik Favoriten, Vienna, Austria. Patient characteristics including age, underlying diseases, vaccination status and outcome were compared between patients with the BA.1 and BA.2 subvariants. Between January 2022 and May 2022 we included 168 patients infected with Omicron BA.1 and 100 patients with BA.2. Patients admitted with BA.2 were significantly older, more often fully immunized and required less dexamethasone than patients with BA.1. No substantial differences were identified between patients infected with BA.1 and BA.2 regarding BMI, laboratory findings, need for supplemental oxygen, mortality and other evaluated comorbidities excepting active malignancies. The significantly larger percentage of fully immunized patients admitted with BA.2 is pointing to an increased transmissibility of this subvariant, while the comparable outcome of a somewhat older and sicker patient population might be indicative of reduced virulence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Animals , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Austria
3.
Eur J Haematol ; 110(1): 67-76, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-COV-2 (Covid-19) pandemic has impacted the management of patients with hematologic disorders. In some entities, an increased risk for Covid-19 infections was reported, whereas others including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) had a lower mortality. We have analyzed the prevalence of Covid-19 infections in patients with mastocytosis during the Covid-19 pandemic in comparison to data from CML patients and the general Austrian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The prevalence of infections and PCR-proven Covid-19 infections was analyzed in 92 patients with mastocytosis. As controls, we used 113 patients with CML and the expected prevalence of Covid-19 in the general Austrian population. RESULTS: In 25% of the patients with mastocytosis (23/92) signs and symptoms of infection, including fever (n = 11), dry cough (n = 10), sore throat (n = 12), pneumonia (n = 1), and dyspnea (n = 3) were recorded. Two (8.7%) of these symptomatic patients had a PCR-proven Covid-19 infection. Thus, the prevalence of Covid-19 infections in mastocytosis was 2.2%. The number of comorbidities, subtype of mastocytosis, regular exercise, smoking habits, age, or duration of disease at the time of interview did not differ significantly between patients with and without Covid-19 infections. In the CML cohort, 23.9% (27/113) of patients reported signs and symptoms of infection (fever, n = 8; dry cough, n = 17; sore throat, n = 11; dyspnea, n = 5). Six (22.2%) of the symptomatic patients had a PCR-proven Covid-19 infection. The prevalence of Covid-19 in all CML patients was 5.3%. The observed number of Covid-19 infections neither in mastocytosis nor in CML patients differed significantly from the expected number of Covid-19 infections in the Austrian population. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show no significant difference in the prevalence of Covid-19 infections among patients with mastocytosis, CML, and the general Austrian population and thus, in mastocytosis, the risk of a Covid-19 infection was not increased compared to the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive , Leukemia, Myeloid , Mastocytosis , Pharyngitis , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Incidence , Cough , Austria/epidemiology , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive/complications , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive/epidemiology , Fever , Dyspnea
4.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 93(3): 1017-1031, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314039

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with high mortality and negative consequences for patients with Alzheimer's disease or dementia and their caregivers. Memory clinics play an important role in enabling early dementia diagnosis and providing support for patients and their caregivers. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions on patients of a memory clinic and their caregivers between March 2020 and March 2021. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, single-center, questionnaire-based, observational study to assess consequences and perception of the COVID-19 pandemic on emotion, cognitive function, social living, areas of care, and information retrieval. RESULTS: Results of 255 participants' (mean age 76.78, SD 8.9; 12% cognitively intact, 33% mild cognitive impairment, 55% dementia) and 203 caregivers' COVID-19 questionnaires (valid response rate 71%) could be included in the study. Participants reported a prevalence of psychological symptoms associated with the pandemic between 3-20%. Caregivers living outside compared to those living with the participant reported higher rates of new onset or worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms in participants since pandemic onset. Patients with dementia showed the lowest use of digital communication before (15.7%) and after (17.1%) pandemic onset in the diagnostic groups. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic frequently led to social isolation and reduced cognitive stimulation due to restrictions in elderly persons with cognitive deficits resulting in negative effects on emotional and social levels. We hypothesize that the implementation and sensitization with digital communication in clinical routine could provide a useful tool to counteract these negative effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Humans , Aged , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/psychology , Pandemics , Austria , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Perception
5.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 301: 89-95, 2023 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313088

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic brought forth rapid responses and changes in the acceptance of digital health interventions. Digital solutions appear increasingly promising, yet little is known about the peculiarities in the psychiatric context, contrary to other medical branches. The project MeHealth aimed at disclosing specific needs and reservations of patients and professionals in the psychiatric field. Apprehensions towards technology were found to be held on both sides. Cooperating with a psychiatric hospital in Austria, through a transdisciplinary research approach including focus groups and workshops, a framework for an integrated Digital Mental Health Tool was established. The findings leading to the framework show a strong need for patient-empowerment, enhancement of trust in technology and the need for multi-stakeholder cooperation. Digital tools should be designed to enhance the continuity of care and information exchange on behalf of the patient. Learnings were gained, which prove recommendable for future R&D projects on digitalization in the delicate field of psychiatry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Research Report , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Austria
6.
Trends Neurosci Educ ; 31: 100203, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2311087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2020, school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic forced students all over the world to promptly alter their learning routines from in-person to distance learning. However, so far, only a limited number of studies from a few countries investigated whether school closures affected students' performance within intelligent tutoring system-such as intelligent tutoring systems. METHOD: In this study, we investigated the effect of school closures in Austria by evaluating data (n = 168 students) derived from an intelligent tutoring system for learning mathematics, which students used before and during the first period of school closures. RESULTS: We found that students' performance increased in mathematics in the intelligent tutoring system during the period of school closures compared to the same period in previous years. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that intelligent tutoring systems were a valuable tool for continuing education and maintaining student learning during school closures in Austria.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , Austria , Pandemics , Schools
7.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0285078, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contextual factors are essential for understanding long-term adjustment to the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, the present study investigated changes in mental health outcomes and subjective pandemic-related experiences over time and across countries. The main objective was to explore how psychological responses vary in relation to individual and environmental factors. METHODS: The sample consisted of N = 1070 participants from the general population of Austria, Croatia, Georgia, Greece, and Portugal. We applied a longitudinal mixed-methods approach, with baseline assessment in summer and autumn 2020 (T1) and follow-up assessment 12 months later (T2). Qualitative content analysis by Mayring was used to analyse open-ended questions about stressful events, positive and negative aspects of the pandemic, and recommendations on how to cope. Mental health outcomes were assessed with the Adjustment Disorder-New Module 8 (ADNM-8), the Primary Care PTSD Screen for DSM-5 (PC-PTSD-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2), and the 5-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5). The analyses were performed with SPSS Statistics Version 26 and MAXQDA 2022. RESULTS: The mental health outcomes significantly differed over time and across countries, with e.g. Greek participants showing decrease in adjustment disorder symptoms (p = .007) between T1 and T2. Compared with other countries, we found better mental health outcomes in the Austrian and the Croatian sample at both timepoints (p < .05). Regarding qualitative data, some themes were equally represented at both timepoints (e.g. Restrictions and changes in daily life), while others were more prominent at T1 (e.g. Work and finances) or T2 (e.g. Vaccination issues). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that people's reactions to the pandemic are largely shaped by the shifting context of the pandemic, country-specific factors, and individual characteristics and circumstances. Resource-oriented interventions focusing on psychological flexibility might promote resilience and mental health amidst the COVID-19 pandemic and other global crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Europe/epidemiology , Austria/epidemiology
8.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306131
9.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305701
10.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305581
11.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296887
12.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296538
13.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294681
14.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294096
15.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303002
16.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302465
17.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300514
18.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300304
19.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299455
20.
HIV Med ; 24 Suppl 1: 3-97, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299174
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