Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 74
Filter
1.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 587-594, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience significantly higher prevalence of other mental disorders, which amplifies their need for overall support. The outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) resulted in restrictions and limited access to different services with great challenge for families and children with ASD. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We used an electronic SurveyMonkey questionnaire to examine the experiences of 114 caregivers of children with ASD. We compared: (a) level of support by the child's school, changes in child behavior, and priority needs for families of ASD and ASD with comorbidities (ASD+) children, during pandemic, and (b) developmental history and diagnosis for ASD and ASD+ children before the pandemic. RESULTS: Our research shows significant behavioral difficulties in the population with ASD and ASD+ that arose in the field of altered living conditions and overall functioning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Statistically significant results comparing ASD to ASD+ children we found in area of getting additional help and support before the outbreak of the pandemic (47.1% vs 16.0%, p=0.002), as well as in worsening of sleep problems, statistically significant more common in children with ASD+ (ASD+ 47.7% vs. ASD 25.7%, p=0.046). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings can contribute to the faster development and implementation of protocols for dealing with situations such as pandemics, related to the vulnerable population of children with ASD and their caregivers.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Caregivers , Serbia/epidemiology , Comorbidity
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043703

ABSTRACT

The main goal of our research was to monitor changes in the mental health of Slovak families with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to families with neurotypical children during three waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. We focused on the prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress and different stressors of parents. In children, we explored maladaptive behavior and the availability of interventions for children with ASD. The data were collected using an extensive questionnaire including the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-42 questionnaire (DASS-42) and two subscales of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS-3). The research sample consisted of a total of 506 parents, 236 of whom have a child with ASD. Parents of children with ASD reported elevated anxiety during the first wave, while changes were found in parents of neurotypical children. During the second wave, the prevalence of anxiety, depression and stress experienced by parents in both groups increased, but significantly more in parents with ASD children. The internalizing maladaptive behavior of children with ASD also increased. During the third wave, no significant differences between the groups of parents were found in stress and anxiety, but parents of ASD children scored higher in depression. Externalized maladaptive behavior of neurotypical children increased, with minimal changes in children with ASD, which can be explained by the improved therapy availability for children with ASD, also observed in our study.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Slovakia/epidemiology
3.
Res Dev Disabil ; 131: 104333, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031667

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has represented a hazardous situation for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families. The difficulties, following the COVID-19-derived lockdown, have involved working from home or loss of employment, and the demands of looking after their children without the daily support of specialists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adaptive behaviour of young adult participants with ASD after the enforcement of lockdown measures in March 2020 in a specialised centre in central Italy, by administering the Italian form of the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales Second Edition (VABS-II), at baseline as well as 6 months and 1 year after the lockdown. Participants with ASD who were not able to access their normal, in-person care - they were only followed at a distance (i.e. telehealth) - declined dramatically in their adaptive behaviour during the first months after the lockdown for some VABS-II dimensions such as the socialisation and daily living domains. The effects of the lockdown on adaptive behaviour remained after 1 year. Our results emphasise the need for immediate, continuous and personal support for people with ASD during and after the restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, in order to ensure at least partial recovery of adaptive functioning.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Child , Young Adult , Humans , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Italy/epidemiology
4.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 572, 2022 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous publications suggested that lockdown is likely to impact daily living issues of individuals with intellectual disabilities. The authors notably suspected an intensification of behavioural, eating and sleep problems. METHODS: To test these hypotheses, we conducted an international online survey about the impact of COVID-19-associated first lockdown on people with genetic neurodevelopmental disorders. This survey was carried out using GenIDA, an international participatory database collecting medical information on genetic neurodevelopmental disorders. Patients' relatives took part in this online survey from 30/04/2020 to 09/06/2020. This survey adapted from GenIDA standard questionnaire requested information on diagnosis, lifestyle and was based on yes/no answers to questions regarding behaviour, diet, and sleep, in the 6-months period before lockdown and during lockdown. We also asked relatives to evaluate the intensity of these problems by severity level. Finally, relatives could freely comment in open fields on the medical and/or quality of life problems they had encountered during lockdown. RESULTS: In total 199 participants-144 children and 45 adults-with neurodevelopmental disorders (intellectual disability (79.4%) and/or autism spectrum disorder (21.6%)) of various genetic origins, with near-equal male/female (96/103) contribution and originating mainly from Europe and Northern America, were included. The average lockdown duration at time of the survey was 57 days. We did not find differences in the frequency of behavioural, eating and sleep problems before and during lockdown. Moreover, there was no apparent difference in the intensity of eating and sleep disorders between both periods. However, for persons with behavioural problems at both periods, relatives reported an increase in aggressivity, self-aggressivity, depressiveness, stereotypies, and restricted interests during lockdown, all of which might be interpreted as consequences of a lack of stimulation or a reaction to unexpected changes in daily habits. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support previous studies that suggest that the negative impact of lockdown does not depend on the intellectual disability per se but on the associated comorbidities such as behavioural disorders. This study addresses the need for prevention of behavioural disturbance in the vulnerable population with genetic neurodevelopmental disabilities.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Intellectual Disability , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Adult , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Intellectual Disability/complications , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Male , Quality of Life , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
5.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0270845, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993475

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic's disruptions to daily routines and services have proven especially challenging for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families. The current retrospective study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic's social environmental changes on parental ratings of personal and child concerns about family conflict, opportunities for social interaction, and loss of institutional support (school and therapy services). Analyses of responses from families with ASD in the US determined differences in concerns across three time points which were measured simultaneously: prior to COVID-19, at the start of COVID-19, and at the time of survey completion. From our sample of 246 school-aged children, parents retrospectively reported significantly increasing levels of concern for both themselves and their children over time, with parents' personal concern levels rated consistently higher than their ratings of their child's level of concern. Concerns about loss of institutional support were higher for parents of children reported as having co-occurring intellectual disability. Further, parents of younger children also reported more concerns about loss of services, as well as more social concerns. For parent ratings of child concerns, children who were reportedly aware of COVID-19 were determined to have higher levels of social concerns and concerns about loss of institutional support. Meanwhile, the child's age and gender did not impact their parent ratings of child concerns. The increased level of parental and child-perceived concerns over the course of the pandemic suggests a need for improved service delivery and support for these families. The high levels of concerns observed in the current study provide support for the need to assess families' priorities and tailor services to best meet families' needs. This will potentially increase the quality of life of family members, and improve ASD services across the lifespan, and improve outcomes.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies
6.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 43(8): 454-460, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985139

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether service losses during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic were associated with worsened parent mental health or child behavioral health among families of children with autism spectrum disorder and to identify factors associated with favorable parent appraisals of habilitative teletherapy (applied behavior analysis; speech, occupational, physical therapy) for their child. METHOD: This web-based survey study was conducted from May to July 2021 with parents whose children were receiving habilitative therapy for autism from an integrated health system. A total of 322 parents responded to the survey (20% response rate). The outcome variables were pandemic-related parent mental health, pandemic-related child behavioral health, and appraisal of habilitative teletherapy. Predictors were COVID-19-related services changes in health care or child care, COVID-19 history (COVID-19 stress, testing positive for COVID-19), and child autism factors (autistic behaviors, caregiving strain). RESULTS: Loss of regular child care was associated with higher odds of worsened parent mental health (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-4.8); higher levels of caregiving strain were associated with worsened child behavioral health (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.4-3.8). Higher levels of COVID-19 stress were associated with more favorable appraisals of telehealth (ß = 0.4, p < 0.01), whereas higher caregiving strain scores were associated with less favorable appraisals of telehealth (ß = -0.2, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: During COVID-19, caregiving factors were associated with worsened parent mental health and worsened child behavioral health, and telehealth is not preferred by all families. Policy interventions to support caregivers, such as affordable, high-quality child care and paid family leave, are a high priority.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy , Autistic Disorder/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Humans , Parents/psychology
7.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 43(8): 461-464, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985138

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Decrease in sunlight exposure during periods of social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic increased the risk of severe manifestations of vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in a particular "high-risk" population. Our objective was to highlight the importance of vitamin D screening in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and restrictive eating. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe 3 adolescent male patients with ASD who developed severe manifestations of VDD and hypocalcemia in late 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. All spent less time outdoors than in prior years because of isolation at home during the pandemic. Presenting symptoms included seizures and atraumatic fractures. All 3 were found to have hypocalcemia and severe VDD. Limited sun exposure because of isolation indoors during the COVID-19 pandemic was a likely contributing factor to the severity of VDD. All 3 were treated with intravenous calcium acutely, followed by oral calcium and vitamin D. Laboratory tests performed post-treatment showed biochemical resolution of hypocalcemia and VDD. CONCLUSION: These cases highlight the importance of screening "at-risk" youth for VDD. Clinicians should be cognizant that children and adolescents with ASD and restricted eating can have severe manifestations of hypocalcemia and VDD. Decreased sun exposure because of isolating indoors during the COVID-19 pandemic increased their risk for this.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Hypocalcemia , Vitamin D Deficiency , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Calcium , Child , Humans , Hypocalcemia/complications , Hypocalcemia/etiology , Male , Pandemics , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/etiology
8.
Res Dev Disabil ; 129: 104307, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic presents a great challenge for governments, health care professionals and the general population. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might be especially vulnerable to restrictions imposed by the crisis. AIM: The objective of the study was to examine the impact of the SARSCoV- 2 pandemic on children with ASD and their families. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We conducted an online survey two months after the beginning of lock-down (18th of May to 5th of July 2020) in Germany and Austria. We investigated behavioral and emotional changes of children related to the lock-down alongside parental stress and intrafamilial burden OUTCOME AND RESULTS: Of the 216 participating families with an autistic child (mean age: 12.23 years), nearly 50% reported aggravation of autistic symptoms and heightened parental stress. Families reported discontinuation of therapy, more intrafamilial conflicts and increase of psychopharmacological medication of the child. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Our report on short-term detrimental effects of the pandemic calls for thorough investigation of long-term sequalae for children and families.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , Autistic Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969264

ABSTRACT

Due to their individual developmental and learning needs, adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) benefit from a variety of educational, medical, and therapeutic services. During the COVID-19 pandemic, these services were discontinued or significantly reduced, which may have resulted in increased difficulties in coping with various areas of life. The purpose of this study was to explore how the pandemic affected the psychosocial and educational functioning of students with ASD. A qualitative, problem-focused interview method was used. The obtained material was subjected to interpretive phenomenological analysis. The study involved 10 secondary school students diagnosed with ASD. The assessment of the effects of the pandemic on the functioning of people with ASD is inconclusive. The respondents noted both negative and positive effects of lockdown. On the positive side, they were able to spend time with their family, isolate themselves from difficult social relationships and feel better. Among the negative effects, adolescents point to difficulties in emotional functioning-increased levels of stress and anxiety, as well as increased feelings of loneliness and difficulties with online education. The study showed the varied experiences of young people with autism during the pandemic, highlighting the significant need to support some of them in terms of their emotional, social and educational functioning.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Psychosocial Functioning , Students/psychology
10.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 43(5): 262-272, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961179

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to present clinician and caregiver perspectives regarding telehealth neurodevelopmental evaluation delivered at the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, we sought to describe telehealth neurodevelopmental evaluations, examine associations between child characteristics and diagnostic factors, determine the impact of technology and family barriers, and report on clinician and caregiver satisfaction with telehealth evaluation. METHODS: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, in-person clinical services at a large children's hospital neurodevelopmental clinic were transitioned to telehealth. Data are presented for 254 remote evaluations of children (18-212 months; referral concern: 51% autism spectrum disorder [ASD], 24% developmental delay/intellectual disability, 25% other neurodevelopmental concern) conducted from May to July 2020. Data were gathered from electronic health records as well as clinician and caregiver surveys. RESULTS: A clinical diagnosis was provided in 72% of telehealth evaluations. Clinicians rated diagnostic certainty as "completely" or "somewhat" certain in 74% of evaluations. Certainty ratings were higher for evaluations in which a diagnosis of ASD was provided. Although technology and family challenges were reported, clinicians rarely identified these as disruptive to the evaluation process. Clinicians reported satisfaction with various aspects of delivering telehealth. Caregivers endorsed high satisfaction with receipt of telehealth and reduced travel burden. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly transformed service delivery for individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities and provided an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the deployment of telehealth evaluation to meet the need for ongoing diagnostic care. Our findings suggest that telehealth holds significant promise for neurodevelopmental assessment both within the context of a global pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child , Humans , Pandemics
11.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 865, 2022 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Screen media use in early childhood has largely increased in recent years, even more so during the COVID-19 epidemic, and there is much discussion regarding its influence on neurodevelopment, including Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). METHODS: We examined the relationship between use of TV, computer, tablet and smartphone at age 2 years and risk of ASD assessed in telephone-based questionnaires among 12,950 children participating in the nationally representative ELFE ('Etude Longitudinale Française sur les Enfants') birth cohort study in France. RESULTS: In inverse-probability weighted (IPW) multinomial regression analyses, children's weekly or daily screen media use was associated with an increased likelihood of an intermediate risk of ASD (IPW-controlled OR for weekly use:1.07, 95% CI 1.02-1.12; IPW-controlled OR for daily use:1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08) but inversely associated with a high risk (IPW-controlled OR for weekly use: 0.60, 95% CI 0.50-0.73; IPW-controlled OR for daily use: 0.75, 95% CI 0.62-0.91), as ascertained by the M-CHAT. This was confirmed when studying TV as well as computer/tablet exposure separately. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our nationally-representative study conducted among a large sample of 2-year-old children, indicates a complex relationship between screen exposure and ASD risk.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Computers , Humans , Smartphone
12.
Child Care Health Dev ; 48(6): 906-910, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916096

ABSTRACT

AIM: This observational and repeated measures study assesses the impact of the first, most restrictive, COVID-19 lockdown in France on children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families. METHOD: During the first COVID-19 lockdown, families of ASD children enrolled in the day-care centre of the child and adolescent psychiatry department of the Tours University Hospital were contacted weekly. A total of 95 parents took part in this study between the 18th of March and the 8th of May 2020. Advice and personalized support materials were provided by professionals involved in children's care. Questions regarding clinical outcomes were addressed to parents, and their assessments were reported on a 5-point Likert scale. Two time points were considered: the first 3 weeks and the three last weeks of the lockdown period. RESULTS: No difference was highlighted between clinical scores collected at the beginning and at the end of the lockdown. No effect of intellectual disability, accommodation type (house or apartment) or parental status was observed. The reasons for the relatively minor impact of the COVID-19 lockdown observed in this study are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Individualized and regular support provided by caregivers, familiar with ASD children's clinical specificities, in the context of a trusted relationship with parents may have contributed to the stability of this population. This 'tailor-made' approach should be promoted, in order to help support families of ASD children in this challenging period.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caregivers , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Parents
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911317

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization has identified nervous system diseases as one of the biggest public health problems, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Considering the extensive benefits of physical activity (PA), the literature on the PA research of ASD has increased each year, but there is a lack of bibliometric analyses in this field. To investigate the research achievements worldwide, this paper adopts bibliometrics to analyze the trend in the academic literature on the PA research of ASD published from 1980 to 2021. The documents were retrieved from the Web of Science database, and the search strategy was to combine the keywords related to "physical activity" and "autism spectrum disorder" by using the Boolean operator tools "OR" and "AND" in the title. A total of 359 English documents were retrieved. Microsoft Excel, Data Wrapper, VOSviewer, and Biblioshiny were used for the visual analysis. We found that the number of published documents increased the fastest from 2017 to 2021, which may be due to the promulgation of the Global Action Plan for Physical Activity 2018-2030 and the influence of COVID-19 on the world. The United States and the University of California systems are in the leading position in this field. Cooperation among countries with different levels of development will help to jointly promote the PA research progress on ASD. The focus themes include "individual effect", "social support" and "activity dose". The analysis of the frontier topic points out that researchers are paying increasing attention to how to improve the health and physical fitness of this group through PA. This research clearly puts forward a comprehensive overview, theme focus, and future trends in this field, which may be helpful to guide future research.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Bibliometrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Humans , United States
14.
Autism Res ; 15(8): 1560-1564, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877560

ABSTRACT

Due to uncertainties associated with the COVID-19 public health crisis, several clinical trials had to be withdrawn or postponed. Our investigation aimed to assess the rate of discontinuation of clinical trials focusing on Autism Spectrum Disorder. Of the 197 registered trials included in our systematic review, 15 (7.6%) were discontinued, with nearly half of these explicitly citing COVID-19 as their reason for discontinuation. Pharmacological trials were six times more likely to be discontinued during the pandemic than non-pharmacological studies. The difference between the likelihood of discontinuation was statistically significant (OR: 6.13; 95% CI: 1.22-30.71). There was no evidence of association between funding source and reasons for discontinuation. Limitations, along with implications for future trials are discussed. LAY SUMMARY: We investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the discontinuation rate of autism clinical trials. We found that drug trials were six times more likely to be discontinued during the pandemic compared to behavioral, diagnostic, and nutritional trials. The overall discontinuation rate was notably lower in autism clinical trials than in other areas of medical research. We recommend an examination of the methodology of the continued autism trials to assess their applicability in other fields.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autistic Disorder/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855585

ABSTRACT

Disruption in routine may be related to experiencing negative emotional states and to aggressive behaviors in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The lockdown because of COVID-19 contributed to the disruption of individuals' routines, including the sleep-wake cycle. The current study tested a relationship between the adherence to the sleep-wake routine and aggressive behaviors via the mediation role of negative emotional states (i.e., anxiety and anger). Forty-three parents of adults with ASD completed a web-based questionnaire about their life condition during the first lockdown (April-May 2020). Preliminary analyses showed a worsening in the adults' aggressive behaviors during the lockdown in comparison to before it (Z = -3.130; p = 0.002). In the mediation models, the relationship between the adherence to the sleep-wake routines and aggressive behaviors was significant. The models showed the hypothesized mediated relationships among the adherence to the sleep-wake routines, negative emotional states, and aggressive behaviors (Model 1: F (1, 41) = 10.478, p < 0.001; Model 2: F(1, 41) = 9.826, p = 0.003). The findings confirmed the potential protective role of the adherence to the sleep-wake routines for the emotional and behavioral adjustment of adults with autism. Theoretical and practical contributions of the study were discussed; indeed, our results may inform parent-coaching as well as intervention programs for individuals with ASD given that adequate sleep hygiene may contribute to improvements in internalizing/externalizing behaviors.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
16.
Res Dev Disabil ; 125: 104232, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852008

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unprecedented challenges introduced by the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may be amplified for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families. AIMS: The current study aimed to describe the experiences of children with ASD and their families during the pandemic and to identify the needs of this community during emergency situations. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Participants were 122 parents of 122 children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years; one parent per family participated) with ASD living in Arizona, USA who participated in the first time point (July/August 2020) of a larger longitudinal survey study. A qualitative approach based in grounded theory methodology was used to analyze six open-ended survey questions. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: The resulting conceptual model included a core category, Longing for Stability, and four main categories: Public Health Measures Yielding New Challenges and Unexpected Gains, Experiencing Abrupt Changes across Developmental Domains, Changing Family Dynamics, and Protective Factors. CONCLUSIONS: Findings add to limited research examining whether, and how, emergency events uniquely impact the ASD community, identifying potential methods by which services can be proactively adapted to best support the needs of children with ASD.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents
17.
J Autism Dev Disord ; 52(12): 5099-5113, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844418

ABSTRACT

The present study examines provider and caregiver satisfaction with telehealth evaluation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children during the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. A telehealth model of ASD evaluation was implemented with 308 children ages 14 to 78 months between May 2020 to June 2021. Data were gathered from electronic health records, autism-specific telehealth diagnostic tools, and post-evaluation surveys. Overall, the majority of providers and caregivers were satisfied with telehealth ASD evaluation. Multiple variables were associated with ratings of satisfaction, differing by providers and caregivers. Findings have important implications for the feasibility and acceptability of telehealth ASD evaluations, in addition to key factors to consider in optimizing and sustaining telehealth evaluations beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , Infant , Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy , Pandemics , Caregivers , SARS-CoV-2 , Personal Satisfaction
18.
Acad Pediatr ; 22(8): 1384-1389, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797340

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and screening equity among eligible children presenting for well-child care in a large primary care pediatric network, we compared rates of ASD screening completion and positivity during the pandemic to the year prior, stratified by sociodemographic factors. METHODS: Patients who presented for in-person well-child care at 16 to 26 months between March 1, 2020 and February 28, 2021 (COVID-19 cohort, n = 24,549) were compared to those who presented between March 1, 2019 and February 29, 2020 (pre-COVID-19 cohort, n = 26,779). Demographics and rates of completion and positivity of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers with Follow-up (M-CHAT/F) were calculated from the electronic health record and compared by cohort using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Total eligible visits decreased by 8.3% between cohorts, with a greater decline in Black and publicly insured children. In the pre-COVID-19 cohort, 89.0% of eligible children were screened at least once, compared to 86.4% during the pandemic (P < 0.001). Significant declines in screening completion were observed across all sociodemographic groups except among Asian children, with the sharpest declines among non-Hispanic White children. Sociodemographic differences were not observed in screen-positive rates by cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Well-child visits and ASD screenings declined across groups, but with different patterns by race and ethnicity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings regarding screen-completion rates should not be interpreted as a decline in screening disparities, given differences in who presented for care. Strategies for catch-up screening for all children should be considered.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Humans , Child , Infant , Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Pandemics , Mass Screening , Primary Health Care
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL