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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 752557, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789371

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze and compare different clinical, laboratory, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics between pediatric and adult patients with first-attack myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease (MOGAD) and to explore predictive factors for severity at disease onset. Methods: Patients diagnosed with MOGAD at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from January 2013 to August 2021 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Age at disease onset, sex, comorbidities, laboratory tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores were collected and analyzed. The association between risk factors and initial EDSS scores at disease onset was analyzed using logistic regression models and Spearman correlation analyses. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the predictive ability of the uric acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels for the severity of neurological dysfunction at the onset of MOGAD. Results: Sixty-seven patients (female, n=34; male, n=33) with first-attack MOGAD were included in this study. The mean age at onset was 26.43 ± 18.22 years (range: 3-79 years). Among patients <18 years of age, the most common presenting symptoms were loss of vision (36.0%), and nausea and vomiting (24.0%), and the most common disease spectrum was acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) (40.0%). Among patients aged ≥18 years, the most common presenting symptoms were loss of vision (35.7%), paresthesia (33.3%), and paralysis (26.2%), and the most common disease spectrum was optic neuritis (35.7%). The most common lesions were cortical gray matter/paracortical white matter lesions in both pediatric and adult patients. Uric acid [odds ratio (OR)=1.014; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.006-1.022; P=0.000] and serum Hcy (OR=1.125; 95% CI=1.017-1.246; P=0.023) levels were significantly associated with the severity of neurological dysfunction at disease onset. Uric acid levels (r=0.2583; P=0.035) and Hcy levels (r=0.3971; P=0.0009) were positively correlated with initial EDSS scores. The areas under the ROC curve were 0.7775 (95% CI= 0.6617‒0.8933; P<0.001) and 0.6767 (95% CI=0.5433‒0.8102, P=0.014) for uric acid and Hcy levels, respectively. Conclusion: The clinical phenotype of MOGAD varies in patients of different ages. The most common disease spectrum was ADEM in patients aged<18 years, while optic neuritis was commonly found in patients aged ≥18 years. The uric acid and Hcy levels are risk factors for the severity of neurological dysfunction at disease onset in patients with first-attack MOGAD.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/epidemiology , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Age of Onset , Aged , Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis/diagnosis , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/diagnostic imaging , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/metabolism , Biomarkers , Central Nervous System/diagnostic imaging , Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins/analysis , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Homocysteine/blood , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Blind Method , Uric Acid/blood , Young Adult
2.
Ann Neurol ; 91(3): 342-352, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648414

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The study was undertaken to assess the impact of B cell depletion on humoral and cellular immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination in patients with various neuroimmunologic disorders on anti-CD20 therapy. This included an analysis of the T cell vaccine response to the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant. METHODS: We investigated prospectively humoral and cellular responses to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination in 82 patients with neuroimmunologic disorders on anti-CD20 therapy and 82 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. For quantification of antibodies, the Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2 viral spike (S) immunoassay against the receptor-binding domain (RBD) was used. IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays were performed to assess T cell responses against the SARS-CoV-2 Wuhan strain and the Delta variant. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies were found less frequently in patients (70% [57/82]) compared with controls (82/82 [100%], p < 0.001). In patients without detectable B cells (<1 B cell/mcl), seroconversion rates and antibody levels were lower compared to nondepleted (≥1 B cell/mcl) patients (p < 0.001). B cell levels ≥1 cell/mcl were sufficient to induce seroconversion in our cohort of anti-CD20 treated patients. In contrast to the antibody response, the T-cell response against the Wuhan strain and the Delta variant was more pronounced in frequency (p < 0.05) and magnitude (p < 0.01) in B-cell depleted compared to nondepleted patients. INTERPRETATION: Antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccinnation can be attained in patients on anti-CD20 therapy by the onset of B cell repopulation. In the absence of B cells, a strong T cell response is generated which may help to protect against severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in this high-risk population. ANN NEUROL 2022;91:342-352.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/blood , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/epidemiology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimmunomodulation/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
3.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(9): 4694-4715, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281328

ABSTRACT

The unremitting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) marked a year-long phase of public health adversaries and has severely compromised healthcare globally. Early evidence of COVID-19 noted its impact on the pulmonary and cardiovascular functions, while multiple studies in recent time shed light on its substantial neurological complications, though a comprehensive understanding of the cause(s), the mechanism(s), and their neuropathological outcomes is scarce. In the present review, we conferred evidence of neurological complications in COVID-19 patients and shed light on the SARS-CoV-2 infection routes including the hematogenous, direct/neuronal, lymphatic tissue or cerebrospinal fluid, or infiltration through infected immune cells, while the underlying mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 invasion to the central nervous system (CNS) was also discussed. In an up-to-date manner, we further reviewed the impact of COVID-19 in developing diverse neurologic manifestations associated with CNS, peripheral nervous system (PNS), skeletal muscle, and also pre-existing neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, we discussed the involvement of key factors including age, sex, comorbidity, and disease severity in exacerbating the neurologic manifestations in COVID-19 patients. An outlook of present therapeutic strategies and state of existing challenges in COVID-19 management was also accessed. Conclusively, the present report provides a comprehensive review of COVID-19-related neurological complications and emphasizes the need for their early clinical management in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Central Nervous System/virology , Child , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Immune System/virology , Inflammation , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/complications , Neurons/virology , Organ Specificity , Sex Factors , Viremia/chemically induced , Viremia/immunology , Virus Internalization
4.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(4): 918-928, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092494

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report initial results of a planned multicenter year-long prospective study examining the risk and impact of COVID-19 among persons with neuroinflammatory disorders (NID), particularly multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In April 2020, we deployed online questionnaires to individuals in their home environment to assess the prevalence and potential risk factors of suspected COVID-19 in persons with NID (PwNID) and change in their neurological care. RESULTS: Our cohort included 1115 participants (630 NID, 98% MS; 485 reference) as of 30 April 2020. 202 (18%) participants, residing in areas with high COVID-19 case prevalence, met the April 2020 CDC symptom criteria for suspected COVID-19, but only 4% of all participants received testing given testing shortages. Among all participants, those with suspected COVID-19 were younger, more racially diverse, and reported more depression and liver disease. PwNID had the same rate of suspected COVID-19 as the reference group. Early changes in disease management included telemedicine visits in 21% and treatment changes in 9% of PwNID. After adjusting for potential confounders, increasing neurological disability was associated with a greater likelihood of suspected COVID-19 (ORadj  = 1.45, 1.17-1.84). INTERPRETATIONS: Our study of real-time, patient-reported experience during the COVID-19 pandemic complements physician-reported MS case registries which capture an excess of severe cases. Overall, PwNID seem to have a risk of suspected COVID-19 similar to the reference population.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Self Report , Adult , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
5.
Crit Rev Immunol ; 40(6): 537-542, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050522

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 has made new treatments a goal for the scientific community. One of these treatments is Ivermectin. Here we discuss the hypothesis of dysbiosis caused by the use of Ivermectin and the possible impacts on neuroinflammatory diseases after the end of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Dysbiosis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disease Susceptibility , Dysbiosis/etiology , Humans , Ivermectin/adverse effects , Ivermectin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
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