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2.
Science ; 375(6585): 1080, 2022 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779303

ABSTRACT

Study finds human version of mouse immune regulators.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Animals , Humans , Mice , Receptors, KIR/analysis
4.
Front Immunol ; 13: 832533, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705491

ABSTRACT

Immunoproteomics has emerged as a versatile tool for analyzing the antibody repertoire in various disease contexts. Until recently, characterization of antibody molecules in biological fluids was limited to bulk serology, which identifies clinically relevant features of polyclonal antibody responses. The past decade, however, has seen the rise of mass-spectrometry-enabled proteomics methods that have allowed profiling of the antibody response at the molecular level, with the disease-specific serological repertoire elucidated in unprecedented detail. In this review, we present an up-to-date survey of insights into the disease-specific immunological repertoire by examining how quantitative proteomics-based approaches have shed light on the humoral immune response to infection and vaccination in pathogenic illnesses, the molecular basis of autoimmune disease, and the tumor-specific repertoire in cancer. We address limitations of this technology with a focus on emerging potential solutions and discuss the promise of high-resolution immunoproteomics in therapeutic discovery and novel vaccine design.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/analysis , Immunoproteins/analysis , Proteomics/methods , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Neoplasms/immunology , Vaccines/immunology
5.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 23, 2022 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703609

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immunocompromised (IC) patients are at higher risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, morbidity, and mortality compared to the general population. They should be prioritized for primary prevention through vaccination. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines in IC patients through a systematic review and meta-analysis approach. METHOD: PubMed-MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched for original articles reporting the immunogenicity of two doses of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in adult patients with IC condition between June 1, 2020 and September 1, 2021. Meta-analysis was performed using either random or fixed effect according to the heterogeneity of the studies. Subgroup analysis was performed to identify potential sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 26 studies on 3207 IC patients and 1726 healthy individuals were included. The risk of seroconversion in IC patients was 48% lower than those in controls (RR = 0.52 [0.42, 0.65]). IC patients with autoimmune conditions were 54%, and patients with malignancy were 42% more likely to have positive seroconversion than transplant recipients (P < 0.01). Subgroup meta-analysis based on the type of malignancy, revealed significantly higher proportion of positive seroconversion in solid organ compared to hematologic malignancies (RR = 0.88 [0.85, 0.92] vs. 0.61 [0.44, 0.86], P = 0.03). Subgroup meta-analysis based on type of transplantation (kidney vs. others) showed no statistically significant between-group difference of seroconversion (P = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS: IC patients, especially transplant recipients, developed lower immunogenicity with two-dose of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Among patients with IC, those with autoimmune conditions and solid organ malignancies are mostly benefited from COVID-19 vaccination. Findings from this meta-analysis could aid healthcare policymakers in making decisions regarding the importance of the booster dose or more strict personal protections in the IC patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , /immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Organ Transplantation , Vaccines, Synthetic/therapeutic use , /therapeutic use
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 734279, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686469

ABSTRACT

Newly emerging variants of coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) raise concerns about the spread of the disease, and with the rising case numbers, the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains a challenging medical emergency towards the end of the year 2021. Swiftly developed novel vaccines aid in the prevention of the spread, and it seems that a specific cure will not be at hand soon. The prognosis of COVID-19 in patients with autoimmune/autoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) is more severe when compared to the otherwise healthy population, and vaccination is essential. Evidence for both the efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccination in AIIRD under immunosuppression is accumulating, but the effect of Interleukin-1 on vaccination in general and in AIIRD patients is rarely addressed in the current literature. In light of the current literature, it seems that the level of agreement on the timing of COVID-19 vaccination is moderate in patients using IL-1 blockers, and expert opinions may vary. Generally, it may be recommended that patients under IL-1 blockade can be vaccinated without interrupting the anti-cytokine therapy, especially in patients with ongoing high disease activity to avoid disease relapses. However, in selected cases, after balancing for disease activity and risk of relapses, vaccination may be given seven days after the drug levels have returned to baseline, especially for IL-1 blocking agents with long half-lives such as canakinumab and rilonacept. This may help to ensure an ideal vaccine response in the face of the possibility that AIIRD patients may develop a more pronounced and severe COVID-19 disease course.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Interleukin-1beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/adverse effects , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/therapeutic use , Rheumatic Diseases/immunology , Vaccination
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 838082, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674340

ABSTRACT

Recombinant antibodies such as nanobodies are progressively demonstrating to be a valid alternative to conventional monoclonal antibodies also for clinical applications. Furthermore, they do not solely represent a substitute for monoclonal antibodies but their unique features allow expanding the applications of biotherapeutics and changes the pattern of disease treatment. Nanobodies possess the double advantage of being small and simple to engineer. This combination has promoted extremely diversified approaches to design nanobody-based constructs suitable for particular applications. Both the format geometry possibilities and the functionalization strategies have been widely explored to provide macromolecules with better efficacy with respect to single nanobodies or their combination. Nanobody multimers and nanobody-derived reagents were developed to image and contrast several cancer diseases and have shown their effectiveness in animal models. Their capacity to block more independent signaling pathways simultaneously is considered a critical advantage to avoid tumor resistance, whereas the mass of these multimeric compounds still remains significantly smaller than that of an IgG, enabling deeper penetration in solid tumors. When applied to CAR-T cell therapy, nanobodies can effectively improve the specificity by targeting multiple epitopes and consequently reduce the side effects. This represents a great potential in treating malignant lymphomas, acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, multiple myeloma and solid tumors. Apart from cancer treatment, multispecific drugs and imaging reagents built with nanobody blocks have demonstrated their value also for detecting and tackling neurodegenerative, autoimmune, metabolic, and infectious diseases and as antidotes for toxins. In particular, multi-paratopic nanobody-based constructs have been developed recently as drugs for passive immunization against SARS-CoV-2 with the goal of impairing variant survival due to resistance to antibodies targeting single epitopes. Given the enormous research activity in the field, it can be expected that more and more multimeric nanobody molecules will undergo late clinical trials in the next future. Systematic Review Registration.


Subject(s)
Single-Domain Antibodies/chemistry , Single-Domain Antibodies/therapeutic use , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/therapy , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Humans , Immunomodulation , Molecular Imaging , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , Single-Domain Antibodies/immunology
8.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 72: 230-238, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603901

ABSTRACT

The study of monogenic autoimmune diseases has provided key insights into molecular mechanisms involved in development of autoimmunity and immune tolerance. It has also become clear that such inborn errors of immunity (IEIs) frequently present clinically not only with autoimmune diseases, but also frequently have increased susceptibility to infection. The genes associated with monogenic autoimmunity influence diverse functional pathways, and the resulting immune dysregulation also impacts the complex and coordinated immune response to pathogens, for example type I interferon and cytokine signaling, the complement pathway and proper differentiation of the immune response. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted how monogenic autoimmunity can increase risk for serious infection with the discovery of severe disease in patients with pre-existing antibodies to Type I IFNs. This review discusses recent insight into the relationship between monogenic autoimmunity and infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Communicable Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Communicable Diseases/genetics , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism
9.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580997

ABSTRACT

There is growing evidence that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can lead to a dysregulation of the immune system with the development of autoimmune phenomena. The consequence of this immune dysregulation ranges from the production of autoantibodies to the onset of rheumatic autoimmune disease. In this context, we conducted a systematic review to analyze the current data regarding the new-onset systemic and rheumatic autoimmune diseases in COVID-19 patients. A literature search in PubMed and Scopus databases from December 2019 to September 2021 identified 99 patients that fulfilled the specific diagnostic/classification criteria and/or nomenclature for each rheumatic autoimmune disease. The main diseases reported were vasculitis and arthritis. Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sarcoidosis were also reported in a limited number of patients, as well as isolated cases of systemic sclerosis and adult-onset Still's disease. These findings highlight the potential spectrum of systemic and rheumatic autoimmune diseases that could be precipitated by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Complementary studies are needed to discern the link between the SARS-CoV-2 and new onset-rheumatic diseases so that this knowledge can be used in early diagnosis and the most suitable management.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/diagnosis , Autoimmune Diseases/etiology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Humans
10.
J Autoimmun ; 125: 102743, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568811

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate humoral responses and safety of mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in systemic autoimmune and autoinflammatory rheumatic disease (SAARD) patients subjected or not to treatment modifications during vaccination. METHODS: A nationwide, multicenter study, including 605 SAARD patients and 116 controls, prospectively evaluated serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1-protein IgG antibody titers, side-effects, and disease activity, one month after complete vaccination, in terms of distinct treatment modification strategies (none, partial and extended modifications). Independent risk factors associated with hampered humoral responses were identified by data-driven multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Patients with extended treatment modifications responded to vaccines similarly to controls as well as SAARD patients without immunosuppressive therapy (97.56% vs 100%, p = 0.2468 and 97.56% vs 97.46%, p > 0.9999, respectively). In contrast, patients with partial or without therapeutic modifications responded in 87.50% and 84.50%, respectively. Furthermore, SAARD patients with extended treatment modifications developed higher anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels compared to those without or with partial modifications (median:7.90 vs 7.06 vs 7.1, p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0195, respectively). Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), rituximab (RTX) and methotrexate (MTX) negatively affected anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral responses. In 10.5% of vaccinated patients, mild clinical deterioration was noted; however, no differences in the incidence of deterioration were observed among the distinct treatment modification SAARD subgroups. Side-effects were generally comparable between SAARD patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: In SAARD patients, mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are effective and safe, both in terms of side-effects and disease flares. Treatment with MMF, RTX and/or MTX compromises anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses, which are restored upon extended treatment modifications without affecting disease activity.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases/immunology , Rheumatic Diseases/immunology , /adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Greece , Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases/drug therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Methotrexate/adverse effects , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/adverse effects , Mycophenolic Acid/therapeutic use , Prospective Studies , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rituximab/adverse effects , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
11.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(12): 2708-3145, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568038

ABSTRACT

The third edition of Flow Cytometry Guidelines provides the key aspects to consider when performing flow cytometry experiments and includes comprehensive sections describing phenotypes and functional assays of all major human and murine immune cell subsets. Notably, the Guidelines contain helpful tables highlighting phenotypes and key differences between human and murine cells. Another useful feature of this edition is the flow cytometry analysis of clinical samples with examples of flow cytometry applications in the context of autoimmune diseases, cancers as well as acute and chronic infectious diseases. Furthermore, there are sections detailing tips, tricks and pitfalls to avoid. All sections are written and peer-reviewed by leading flow cytometry experts and immunologists, making this edition an essential and state-of-the-art handbook for basic and clinical researchers.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Flow Cytometry , Infections/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Animals , Chronic Disease , Humans , Mice , Practice Guidelines as Topic
12.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538550

ABSTRACT

A cytokine storm is an abnormal discharge of soluble mediators following an inappropriate inflammatory response that leads to immunopathological events. Cytokine storms can occur after severe infections as well as in non-infectious situations where inflammatory cytokine responses are initiated, then exaggerated, but fail to return to homeostasis. Neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, and natural killer cells are among the innate leukocytes that contribute to the pathogenesis of cytokine storms. Neutrophils participate as mediators of inflammation and have roles in promoting homeostatic conditions following pathological inflammation. This review highlights the advances in understanding the mechanisms governing neutrophilic inflammation against viral and bacterial pathogens, in cancers, and in autoimmune diseases, and how neutrophils could influence the development of cytokine storm syndromes. Evidence for the destructive potential of neutrophils in their capacity to contribute to the onset of cytokine storm syndromes is presented across a multitude of clinical scenarios. Further, a variety of potential therapeutic strategies that target neutrophils are discussed in the context of suppressing multiple inflammatory conditions.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokines/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Animals , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/immunology
14.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 74(1): 33-37, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527417

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: B cell depletion is an established therapeutic principle in a wide range of autoimmune diseases. However, B cells are also critical for inducing protective immunity after infection and vaccination. We undertook this study to assess humoral and cellular immune responses after infection with or vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with B cell depletion and controls who are B cell-competent. METHODS: Antibody responses (tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and T cell responses (tested using interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay) against the SARS-CoV-2 spike S1 and nucleocapsid proteins were assessed in a limited number of previously infected (n = 6) and vaccinated (n = 8) autoimmune disease patients with B cell depletion, as well as previously infected (n = 30) and vaccinated (n = 30) healthy controls. RESULTS: As expected, B cell and T cell responses to the nucleocapsid protein were observed only after infection, while respective responses to SARS-CoV-2 spike S1 were found after both infection and vaccination. A SARS-CoV-2 antibody response was observed in all vaccinated controls (30 of 30 [100%]) but in none of the vaccinated patients with B cell depletion (0 of 8). In contrast, after SARS-CoV-2 infection, both the patients with B cell depletion (spike S1, 5 of 6 [83%]; nucleocapsid, 3 of 6 [50%]) and healthy controls (spike S1, 28 of 30 [93%]; nucleocapsid, 28 of 30 [93%]) developed antibodies. T cell responses against the spike S1 and nucleocapsid proteins were found in both infected and vaccinated patients with B cell depletion and in the controls. CONCLUSION: These data show that B cell depletion completely blocks humoral but not T cell SARS-CoV-2 vaccination response. Furthermore, limited humoral immune responses are found after SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with B cell depletion.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocyte Depletion/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology
15.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(1): 23-29, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516851

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to be a cause of unprecedented global morbidity and mortality. Whilst COVID-19 vaccination has emerged as the only tangible solution to reducing poor clinical outcomes, vaccine hesitancy continues to be an obstacle to achieving high levels of vaccine uptake. This represents particular risk to patients with autoimmune diseases, a group already at increased risk of hospitalization and poor clinical outcomes related to COVID-19 infection. Whilst there is a paucity of long-term safety and efficacy data of COVID-19 vaccination in patients with autoimmune diseases, the current evidence strongly suggests that the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks of adverse effects and disease flares. Herein, we report the protocol of the COVID-19 Vaccination in Autoimmune Diseases (COVAD) study, an ongoing international collaborative study involving 29 countries and over 110 investigators.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/immunology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Vaccination
16.
Reumatol Clin (Engl Ed) ; 17(9): 491-493, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510266

ABSTRACT

SARS-COV-2 infection has spread worldwide since it originated in December 2019, in Wuhan, China. The pandemic has largely demonstrated the resilience of the world's health systems and is the greatest health emergency since World War II. There is no single therapeutic approach to the treatment of COVID-19 and the associated immune disorder. The lack of randomised clinical trials (RCTs) has led different countries to tackle the disease based on case series, or from results of observational studies with off-label drugs. We as rheumatologists in general, and specifically rheumatology fellows, have been on the front line of the pandemic, modifying our activities and altering our training itinerary. We have attended patients, we have learned about the management of the disease and from our previous experience with drugs for arthritis and giant cell arteritis, we have used these drugs to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Factors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Physician's Role , Rheumatologists , Autoimmune Diseases/complications , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Education, Medical, Graduate , Fellowships and Scholarships , Global Health , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/immunology , Rheumatologists/education , Rheumatologists/organization & administration , Rheumatology/education , Rheumatology/methods , Rheumatology/organization & administration , Spain/epidemiology
17.
J Autoimmun ; 125: 102744, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509938

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune systemic diseases (ASD) may show impaired immunogenicity to COVID-19 vaccines. Our prospective observational multicenter study aimed to evaluate the seroconversion after the vaccination cycle and at 6-12-month follow-up, as well the safety and efficacy of vaccines in preventing COVID-19. The study included 478 unselected ASD patients (mean age 59 ± 15 years), namely 101 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 38 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 265 systemic sclerosis (SSc), 61 cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV), and a miscellanea of 13 systemic vasculitis. The control group included 502 individuals from the general population (mean age 59 ± 14SD years). The immunogenicity of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines (BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273) was evaluated by measuring serum IgG-neutralizing antibody (NAb) (SARS-CoV-2 IgG II Quant antibody test kit; Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL) on samples obtained within 3 weeks after vaccination cycle. The short-term results of our prospective study revealed significantly lower NAb levels in ASD series compared to controls [286 (53-1203) vs 825 (451-1542) BAU/mL, p < 0.0001], as well as between single ASD subgroups and controls. More interestingly, higher percentage of non-responders to vaccine was recorded in ASD patients compared to controls [13.2% (63/478), vs 2.8% (14/502); p < 0.0001]. Increased prevalence of non-response to vaccine was also observed in different ASD subgroups, in patients with ASD-related interstitial lung disease (p = 0.009), and in those treated with glucocorticoids (p = 0.002), mycophenolate-mofetil (p < 0.0001), or rituximab (p < 0.0001). Comparable percentages of vaccine-related adverse effects were recorded among responder and non-responder ASD patients. Patients with weak/absent seroconversion, believed to be immune to SARS-CoV-2 infection, are at high risk to develop COVID-19. Early determination of serum NAb after vaccination cycle may allow to identify three main groups of ASD patients: responders, subjects with suboptimal response, non-responders. Patients with suboptimal response should be prioritized for a booster-dose of vaccine, while a different type of vaccine could be administered to non-responder individuals.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Autoimmune Diseases/blood , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , /immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Italy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Scleroderma, Systemic/immunology , Systemic Vasculitis/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccine Potency
18.
Scand J Immunol ; 94(5): e13101, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501497

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) challenged globally with its morbidity and mortality. A small percentage of affected patients (20%) progress into the second stage of the disease clinically presenting with severe or fatal involvement of lung, heart and vascular system, all contributing to multiple-organ failure. The so-called 'cytokines storm' is considered the pathogenic basis of severe disease and it is a target for treatment with corticosteroids, immunotherapies and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). We provide an overview of the role of IVIg in the therapy of adult patients with COVID-19 disease. After discussing the possible underlying mechanisms of IVIg immunomodulation in COVID-19 disease, we review the studies in which IVIg was employed. Considering the latest evidence that show a link between new coronavirus and autoimmunity, we also discuss the use of IVIg in COVID-19 and anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination related autoimmune diseases and the post-COVID-19 syndrome. The benefit of high-dose IVIg is evident in almost all studies with a rapid response, a reduction in mortality and improved pulmonary function in critically ill COVID-19 patients. It seems that an early administration of IVIg is crucial for a successful outcome. Studies' limitations are represented by the small number of patients, the lack of control groups in some and the heterogeneity of included patients. IVIg treatment can reduce the stay in ICU and the demand for mechanical ventilation, thus contributing to attenuate the burden of the disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Autoimmune Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Autoimmune Diseases/etiology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Critical Illness , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Respiration, Artificial , Treatment Outcome
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 747143, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497080

ABSTRACT

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are the major determinant of peripheral immune tolerance. Many Treg subsets have been described, however thymus-derived and peripherally induced Tregs remain the most important subpopulations. In multiple sclerosis, a prototypical autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system, Treg dysfunction is a pathogenic hallmark. In contrast, induction of Treg proliferation and enhancement of their function are central immune evasion mechanisms of infectious pathogens. In accordance, Treg expansion is compartmentalized to tissues with high viral replication and prolonged in chronic infections. In friend retrovirus infection, Treg expansion is mainly based on excessive interleukin-2 production by infected effector T cells. Moreover, pathogens seem also to enhance Treg functions as shown in human immunodeficiency virus infection, where Tregs express higher levels of effector molecules such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4, CD39 and cAMP and show increased suppressive capacity. Thus, insights into the molecular mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens alter Treg functions might aid to find new therapeutic approaches to target central nervous system autoimmunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of pathogens for Treg function in the context of autoimmune neuroinflammation. We discuss the mechanistic implications for future therapies and provide an outlook for new research directions.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/microbiology , /microbiology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Animals , Humans , /immunology
20.
Front Immunol ; 12: 732992, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497075

ABSTRACT

Chronic inflammatory disorders (CID), such as autoimmune diseases, are characterized by overactivation of the immune system and loss of immune tolerance. T helper 17 (Th17) cells are strongly associated with the pathogenesis of multiple CID, including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In line with the increasingly recognized contribution of innate immune cells to the modulation of dendritic cell (DC) function and DC-driven adaptive immune responses, we recently showed that neutrophils are required for DC-driven Th17 cell differentiation from human naive T cells. Consequently, recruitment of neutrophils to inflamed tissues and lymph nodes likely creates a highly inflammatory loop through the induction of Th17 cells that should be intercepted to attenuate disease progression. Tolerogenic therapy via DCs, the central orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, is a promising strategy for the treatment of CID. Tolerogenic DCs could restore immune tolerance by driving the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the periphery. In this review, we discuss the effects of the tolerogenic adjuvants vitamin D3 (VD3), corticosteroids (CS), and retinoic acid (RA) on both DCs and neutrophils and their potential interplay. We briefly summarize how neutrophils shape DC-driven T-cell development in general. We propose that, for optimization of tolerogenic DC therapy for the treatment of CID, both DCs for tolerance induction and the neutrophil inflammatory loop should be targeted while preserving the potential Treg-enhancing effects of neutrophils.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/therapeutic use , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmunity/drug effects , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Immune Tolerance/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Neutrophils/drug effects , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism
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