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1.
Gut Microbes ; 14(1): 2018900, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585291

ABSTRACT

Mounting evidence suggests that the gut-to-lung axis is critical during respiratory viral infections. We herein hypothesized that disruption of gut homeostasis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection may associate with early disease outcomes. To address this question, we took advantage of the Syrian hamster model. Our data confirmed that this model recapitulates some hallmark features of the human disease in the lungs. We further showed that SARS-CoV-2 infection associated with mild intestinal inflammation, relative alteration in intestinal barrier property and liver inflammation and altered lipid metabolism. These changes occurred concomitantly with an alteration of the gut microbiota composition over the course of infection, notably characterized by a higher relative abundance of deleterious bacterial taxa such as Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae. Conversely, several members of the Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae families, including bacteria known to produce the fermentative products short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), had a reduced relative proportion compared to non-infected controls. Accordingly, infection led to a transient decrease in systemic SCFA amounts. SCFA supplementation during infection had no effect on clinical and inflammatory parameters. Lastly, a strong correlation between some gut microbiota taxa and clinical and inflammation indices of SARS-CoV-2 infection severity was evidenced. Collectively, alteration of the gut microbiota correlates with disease severity in hamsters making this experimental model valuable for the design of interventional, gut microbiota-targeted, approaches for the control of COVID-19.Abbreviations: SARS-CoV-2, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; COVID-19, coronavirus disease 2019; SCFAs, short-chain fatty acids; dpi, day post-infection; RT-PCR, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; IL, interleukin. ACE2, angiotensin converting enzyme 2; TMPRSS2, transmembrane serine protease 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Mesocricetus , Animals , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cricetinae , Fatty Acids, Volatile/administration & dosage , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-13, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574011

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, is now pandemic. While most Covid-19 patients will experience mild symptoms, a small proportion will develop severe disease, which could be fatal. Clinically, Covid-19 patients manifest fever with dry cough, fatigue and dyspnoea, and in severe cases develop into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), sepsis and multi-organ failure. These severe patients are characterized by hyperinflammation with highly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-alpha as well as C-reactive protein, which are accompanied by decreased lymphocyte counts. Clinical evidence supports that gut microbiota dysregulation is common in Covid-19 and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Covid-19. In this narrative review, we summarize the roles of intestinal dysbiosis in Covid-19 pathogenesis and posit that the associated mechanisms are being mediated by gut bacterial metabolites. Based on this premise, we propose possible clinical implications. Various risk factors could be causal for severe Covid-19, and these include advanced age, concomitant chronic disease, SARS-CoV-2 infection of enterocytes, use of antibiotics and psychological distress. Gut dysbiosis is associated with risk factors and severe Covid-19 due to decreased commensal microbial metabolites, which cause reduced anti-inflammatory mechanisms and chronic low-grade inflammation. The preconditioned immune dysregulation enables SARS-CoV-2 infection to progress to an uncontrolled hyperinflammatory response. Thus, a pre-existing gut microbiota that is diverse and abundant could be beneficial for the prevention of severe Covid-19, and supplementation with commensal microbial metabolites may facilitate and augment the treatment of severe Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/metabolism , COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Animals , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Dysbiosis/genetics , Dysbiosis/immunology , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Dysbiosis/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24042, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574556

ABSTRACT

The microbiota of the nasopharyngeal tract (NT) play a role in host immunity against respiratory infectious diseases. However, scant information is available on interactions of SARS-CoV-2 with the nasopharyngeal microbiome. This study characterizes the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on human nasopharyngeal microbiomes and their relevant metabolic functions. Twenty-two (n = 22) nasopharyngeal swab samples (including COVID-19 patients = 8, recovered humans = 7, and healthy people = 7) were collected, and underwent to RNAseq-based metagenomic investigation. Our RNAseq data mapped to 2281 bacterial species (including 1477, 919 and 676 in healthy, COVID-19 and recovered metagenomes, respectively) indicating a distinct microbiome dysbiosis. The COVID-19 and recovered samples included 67% and 77% opportunistic bacterial species, respectively compared to healthy controls. Notably, 79% commensal bacterial species found in healthy controls were not detected in COVID-19 and recovered people. Similar dysbiosis was also found in viral and archaeal fraction of the nasopharyngeal microbiomes. We also detected several altered metabolic pathways and functional genes in the progression and pathophysiology of COVID-19. The nasopharyngeal microbiome dysbiosis and their genomic features determined by our RNAseq analyses shed light on early interactions of SARS-CoV-2 with the nasopharyngeal resident microbiota that might be helpful for developing microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for this novel pandemic disease.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , COVID-19/microbiology , Nasopharynx/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/pathogenicity , Case-Control Studies , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Metagenomics , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Symbiosis , Young Adult
4.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0005521, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467670

ABSTRACT

Bacterial-viral interactions in saliva have been associated with morbidity and mortality for respiratory viruses such as influenza and SARS-CoV. However, such transkingdom relationships during SARS-CoV-2 infection are currently unknown. Here, we aimed to elucidate the relationship between saliva microbiota and SARS-CoV-2 in a cohort of newly hospitalized COVID-19 patients and controls. We used 16S rRNA sequencing to compare microbiome diversity and taxonomic composition between COVID-19 patients (n = 53) and controls (n = 59) and based on saliva SARS-CoV-2 viral load as measured using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The saliva microbiome did not differ markedly between COVID-19 patients and controls. However, we identified significant differential abundance of numerous taxa based on saliva SARS-CoV-2 viral load, including multiple species within Streptococcus and Prevotella. IMPORTANCE Alterations to the saliva microbiome based on SARS-CoV-2 viral load indicate potential biologically relevant bacterial-viral relationships which may affect clinical outcomes in COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , COVID-19/pathology , Microbial Interactions/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saliva/microbiology , Bacteria/genetics , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Female , Humans , Male , Microbiota/genetics , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/microbiology , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Viral Load
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463710

ABSTRACT

The present Special Issue focuses on the latest approaches to health and public health microbiology using multiomics [...].


Subject(s)
Bacteria/growth & development , Holistic Health/standards , Metabolome , Metagenome , Microbiota , Proteome , Public Health/standards , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Humans
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5026, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363491

ABSTRACT

Nationwide prospective surveillance of all-age patients with acute respiratory infections was conducted in China between 2009‒2019. Here we report the etiological and epidemiological features of the 231,107 eligible patients enrolled in this analysis. Children <5 years old and school-age children have the highest viral positivity rate (46.9%) and bacterial positivity rate (30.9%). Influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus are the three leading viral pathogens with proportions of 28.5%, 16.8% and 16.7%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the three leading bacterial pathogens (29.9%, 18.6% and 15.8%). Negative interactions between viruses and positive interactions between viral and bacterial pathogens are common. A Join-Point analysis reveals the age-specific positivity rate and how this varied for individual pathogens. These data indicate that differential priorities for diagnosis, prevention and control should be highlighted in terms of acute respiratory tract infection patients' demography, geographic locations and season of illness in China.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Young Adult
7.
J Microbiol ; 59(10): 941-948, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432635

ABSTRACT

Several follow-up studies have found that COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) patients had persistent symptoms after discharge. Gut microbiota play an important role in human health and immune responses. Therefore, this study investigated the gut microbiota of recovered COVID-19 patients and the correlations between gut microbiota and persistent symptoms after discharge. Stool samples were collected from 15 recovered healthcare workers (HCWs) with COVID-19 at three months after discharge, in addition, stool samples were collected from 14 healthy controls (HCs) to perform 16S rRNA gene sequencing between May and July 2020. Compared with HCs, recovered HCWs had reduced bacterial diversity at three months after discharge, with a significantly higher relative abundance of opportunistic pathogens, and a significantly lower relative abundance of beneficial bacteria. In addition, Escherichia unclassified was positively correlated with persistent symptoms at three months after discharge, including fatigue (r = 0.567, p = 0.028), chest tightness after activity (r = 0.687, p = 0.005), and myalgia (r = 0.523, p = 0.045). Intestinibacter bartlettii was positively correlated with anorexia (r = 0.629, p = 0.012) and fatigue (r = 0.545, p = 0.036). However, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was negatively correlated with chest tightness after activity (r = -0.591, p = 0.02), and Intestinimonas butyriciproducens was negatively correlated with cough (r = -0.635, p = 0.011). In conclusion, the gut microbiota of recovered HCWs with COVID-19 at three months after discharge was different from that of HCs, and altered gut microbiota was correlated with persistent symptoms after discharge, highlighting that gut microbiota may play an important role in the recovery of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/microbiology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/microbiology , Patient Discharge , Phylogeny , Survivors/statistics & numerical data
8.
Nat Microbiol ; 6(10): 1245-1258, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380902

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure is associated with increased mortality in COVID-19 patients. There are no validated lower airway biomarkers to predict clinical outcome. We investigated whether bacterial respiratory infections were associated with poor clinical outcome of COVID-19 in a prospective, observational cohort of 589 critically ill adults, all of whom required mechanical ventilation. For a subset of 142 patients who underwent bronchoscopy, we quantified SARS-CoV-2 viral load, analysed the lower respiratory tract microbiome using metagenomics and metatranscriptomics and profiled the host immune response. Acquisition of a hospital-acquired respiratory pathogen was not associated with fatal outcome. Poor clinical outcome was associated with lower airway enrichment with an oral commensal (Mycoplasma salivarium). Increased SARS-CoV-2 abundance, low anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody response and a distinct host transcriptome profile of the lower airways were most predictive of mortality. Our data provide evidence that secondary respiratory infections do not drive mortality in COVID-19 and clinical management strategies should prioritize reducing viral replication and maximizing host responses to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adaptive Immunity , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Load , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Male , Microbiota , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiratory System/immunology , Respiratory System/microbiology , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Load
9.
JCI Insight ; 6(20)2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360585

ABSTRACT

In the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, many individuals experience prolonged symptoms, termed long-lasting COVID-19 symptoms (long COVID). Long COVID is thought to be linked to immune dysregulation due to harmful inflammation, with the exact causes being unknown. Given the role of the microbiome in mediating inflammation, we aimed to examine the relationship between the oral microbiome and the duration of long COVID symptoms. Tongue swabs were collected from patients presenting with COVID-19 symptoms. Confirmed infections were followed until resolution of all symptoms. Bacterial composition was determined by metagenomic sequencing. We used random forest modeling to identify microbiota and clinical covariates that are associated with long COVID symptoms. Of the patients followed, 63% developed ongoing symptomatic COVID-19 and 37% went on to long COVID. Patients with prolonged symptoms had significantly higher abundances of microbiota that induced inflammation, such as members of the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, which, of note, are species that produce LPS. The oral microbiome of patients with long COVID was similar to that of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Altogether, our findings suggest an association with the oral microbiome and long COVID, revealing the possibility that dysfunction of the oral microbiome may have contributed to this draining disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dysbiosis , Inflammation , Microbiota , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Female , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
10.
mBio ; 12(4): e0177721, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360545

ABSTRACT

Viral infection of the respiratory tract can be associated with propagating effects on the airway microbiome, and microbiome dysbiosis may influence viral disease. Here, we investigated the respiratory tract microbiome in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its relationship to disease severity, systemic immunologic features, and outcomes. We examined 507 oropharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, and endotracheal samples from 83 hospitalized COVID-19 patients as well as non-COVID patients and healthy controls. Bacterial communities were interrogated using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the commensal DNA viruses Anelloviridae and Redondoviridae were quantified by qPCR. We found that COVID-19 patients had upper respiratory microbiome dysbiosis and greater change over time than critically ill patients without COVID-19. Oropharyngeal microbiome diversity at the first time point correlated inversely with disease severity during hospitalization. Microbiome composition was also associated with systemic immune parameters in blood, as measured by lymphocyte/neutrophil ratios and immune profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Intubated patients showed patient-specific lung microbiome communities that were frequently highly dynamic, with prominence of Staphylococcus. Anelloviridae and Redondoviridae showed more frequent colonization and higher titers in severe disease. Machine learning analysis demonstrated that integrated features of the microbiome at early sampling points had high power to discriminate ultimate level of COVID-19 severity. Thus, the respiratory tract microbiome and commensal viruses are disturbed in COVID-19 and correlate with systemic immune parameters, and early microbiome features discriminate disease severity. Future studies should address clinical consequences of airway dysbiosis in COVID-19, its possible use as biomarkers, and the role of bacterial and viral taxa identified here in COVID-19 pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE COVID-19, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection of the respiratory tract, results in highly variable outcomes ranging from minimal illness to death, but the reasons for this are not well understood. We investigated the respiratory tract bacterial microbiome and small commensal DNA viruses in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and found that each was markedly abnormal compared to that in healthy people and differed from that in critically ill patients without COVID-19. Early airway samples tracked with the level of COVID-19 illness reached during hospitalization, and the airway microbiome also correlated with immune parameters in blood. These findings raise questions about the mechanisms linking SARS-CoV-2 infection and other microbial inhabitants of the airway, including whether the microbiome might regulate severity of COVID-19 disease and/or whether early microbiome features might serve as biomarkers to discriminate disease severity.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , Nasopharynx/microbiology , Oropharynx/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anelloviridae/classification , Anelloviridae/genetics , Anelloviridae/isolation & purification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Microbiota , Middle Aged , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(3): 115416, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID19 is the novel respiratory illness caused by SARS-CoV-2. The presence of other potentially pathogenic microorganisms could worsen the prognosis of these patients. AIM: The study aims to describe coinfections in COVID-19 patients and contrast it between standard ward and critical care patients at Hospital Central de la Defensa Gómez Ulla (HCDGU). METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out of patients with COVID-19 confirmed with RTPCR admitted to the HCDGU from March 5, 2020 to May 7 of 2020. FINDINGS: Of a total of 703 patients with COVID-19, 75(10.7%) had other microbiologically confirmed infections: 9% (58/648) in standard ward patients and 31.5%(17/54) in critical care patients. In total 86 samples of the 75 patients presented some microorganism; clinically relevant bacteraemias, 50%, respiratory cultures, 32.6% and pneumococcal positive antigens, 17.4%. CONCLUSIONS: We found a low frequency of microorganism coinfection in COVID-19 patients, however in critical care these coinfections increased considerably.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/diagnosis , Inpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Bacteremia/complications , Bacteremia/microbiology , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
12.
Cell Rep ; 36(9): 109637, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356160

ABSTRACT

Research conducted on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pathogenesis and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) generally focuses on the systemic host response, especially that generated by severely ill patients, with few studies investigating the impact of acute SARS-CoV-2 at the site of infection. We show that the nasal microbiome of SARS-CoV-2-positive patients (CoV+, n = 68) at the time of diagnosis is unique when compared to CoV- healthcare workers (n = 45) and CoV- outpatients (n = 21). This shift is marked by an increased abundance of bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is also positively associated with viral RNA load. Additionally, we observe a robust host transcriptional response in the nasal epithelia of CoV+ patients, indicative of an antiviral innate immune response and neuronal damage. These data suggest that the inflammatory response caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with an increased abundance of bacterial pathogens in the nasal cavity that could contribute to increased incidence of secondary bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19 , Microbiota , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Male , Middle Aged , Nose/microbiology , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Seq , Transcriptome , Viral Load , Young Adult
13.
Bioorg Chem ; 114: 105153, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324044

ABSTRACT

A series of novel substituted phenyl 1, 3-thiazolidin-4-one sulfonyl derivatives 5 (a-t) were synthesized and screened for their in-vitro anti-microbial and anti-viral activity. The result of the anti-microbial assay demonstrated compounds 5d, 5f, 5g, 5h, 5i, 5j showed prominent inhibitory activity against all the tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, while compounds 5g, 5j, 5o, 5p, 5q showed significant activity against the entire set of fungal strains as compared to standard drug Ampicillin and Clotrimazole, respectively. The antimicrobial study revealed that compounds having electron-withdrawing groups showed significant antimicrobial potency. The most active antibacterial compound 5j showed potent inhibition of S. aureus DNA Gyrase enzyme as a possible mechanism of action for antimicrobial activity. Moreover, the antiviral testing of selected compounds showed considerable activity against Herpes simplex virus-1(KOS), Herpes simplex virus-2 (G), Herpes simplex virus-1(TK- KOS ACVr), Vaccinia virus, Human Coronavirus (229E), Reovirus-1, Sindbis virus, Coxsackie virus B4, Yellow Fever virus and Influenza A, B virus. Compounds 5h exhibited low anti-viral activity against HIV-1(strain IIIB) and HIV-2 (strain ROD). The study clearly outlined that synthesized compounds endowed with good antimicrobial property together with considerable antiviral activity.


Subject(s)
Phenols/chemical synthesis , Sulfonamides/chemical synthesis , Toluene/analogs & derivatives , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemical synthesis , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/drug effects , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Phenols/chemistry , Phenols/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/chemistry , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Toluene/chemical synthesis , Toluene/chemistry , Toluene/pharmacology , Vero Cells , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
14.
NPJ Biofilms Microbiomes ; 7(1): 61, 2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322476

ABSTRACT

The human oral and gut commensal microbes play vital roles in the development and maintenance of immune homeostasis, while its association with susceptibility and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection is barely understood. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the oral and intestinal flora before and after the clearance of SARS-CoV-2 in 53 COVID-19 patients, and then examined their microbiome alterations in comparison to 76 healthy individuals. A total of 140 throat swab samples and 81 fecal samples from these COVID-19 patients during hospitalization, and 44 throat swab samples and 32 fecal samples from sex and age-matched healthy individuals were collected and then subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing and viral load inspection. We found that SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with alterations of the microbiome community in patients as indicated by both alpha and beta diversity indexes. Several bacterial taxa were identified related to SARS-CoV-2 infection, wherein elevated Granulicatella and Rothia mucilaginosa were found in both oral and gut microbiome. The SARS-CoV-2 viral load in those samples was also calculated to identify potential dynamics between COVID-19 and the microbiome. These findings provide a meaningful baseline for microbes in the digestive tract of COVID-19 patients and will shed light on new dimensions for disease pathophysiology, potential microbial biomarkers, and treatment strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Mouth/microbiology , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1515-1518, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313723

ABSTRACT

We show a shift in the prevalence of respiratory viral pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our data support the efficiency of non-pharmaceutical interventions on virus circulation except for rhinoviruses. The consequences of an altered circulation on subsequent winter seasons remain unclear and support the importance of systematic virological surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/virology , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Community-Acquired Infections/virology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/isolation & purification , Young Adult
16.
OMICS ; 25(8): 484-494, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307504

ABSTRACT

Pandemics and environmental crises evident from the first two decades of the 21st century call for methods innovation in biosurveillance and early detection of risk signals in planetary ecosystems. In crises conditions, conventional methods in public health, biosecurity, and environmental surveillance do not work well. In addition, the standard laboratory amenities and procedures may become unavailable, irrelevant, or simply not feasible, for example, owing to disruptions in logistics and process supply chains. The COVID-19 pandemic has been a wakeup call in this sense to reintroduce point-of-need diagnostics with an eye to limited resource settings and biosurveillance solutions. We report here a methodology innovation, a fast, scalable, and alkaline DNA extraction pipeline for emergency microbiomics biosurveillance. We believe that the presented methodology is well poised for effective, resilient, and anticipatory responses to future pandemics and ecological crises while contributing to microbiome science and point-of-need diagnostics in nonelective emergency contexts. The alkaline DNA extraction pipeline can usefully expand the throughput in emergencies by deployment or to allow backup in case of instrumentation failure in vital facilities. The need for distributed public health genomics surveillance is increasingly evident in the 21st century. This study makes a contribution to these ends broadly, and for future pandemic preparedness in particular. We call for innovation in biosurveillance methods that remain important existentially on a planet under pressure from unchecked human growth and breach of the boundaries between human and nonhuman animal habitats.


Subject(s)
Biosurveillance/methods , DNA/isolation & purification , Microbiological Techniques , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Animals , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Fungi/classification , Fungi/genetics , Fungi/isolation & purification , Genetic Techniques/economics , Humans , Microbiological Techniques/economics , Plants/microbiology
17.
Microb Ecol ; 82(2): 365-376, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293356

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has had major impact on human health worldwide. Whilst national and international COVID-19 lockdown and travel restriction measures have had widespread negative impact on economies and mental health, they may have beneficial effect on the environment, reducing air and water pollution. Mass bathing events (MBE) also known as Kumbh Mela are known to cause perturbations of the ecosystem affecting resilient bacterial populations within water of rivers in India. Lockdowns and travel restrictions provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of minimum anthropogenic activity on the river water ecosystem and changes in bacterial populations including antibiotic-resistant strains. We performed a spatiotemporal meta-analysis of bacterial communities of the Godavari River, India. Targeted metagenomics revealed a 0.87-fold increase in the bacterial diversity during the restricted activity of lockdown. A significant increase in the resilient phyla, viz. Proteobacteria (70.6%), Bacteroidetes (22.5%), Verrucomicrobia (1.8%), Actinobacteria (1.2%) and Cyanobacteria (1.1%), was observed. There was minimal incorporation of allochthonous bacterial communities of human origin. Functional profiling using imputed metagenomics showed reduction in infection and drug resistance genes by - 0.71-fold and - 0.64-fold, respectively. These observations may collectively indicate the positive implications of COVID-19 lockdown measures which restrict MBE, allowing restoration of the river ecosystem and minimise the associated public health risk.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Communicable Disease Control/legislation & jurisprudence , Ecosystem , Rivers/microbiology , Bacteria/classification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Environmental Monitoring , Hinduism , Human Activities , India/epidemiology , Principal Component Analysis
18.
Gut Microbes ; 13(1): 1-15, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281828

ABSTRACT

To investigate the relationship between intestinal microbiota and SARS-CoV-2-mediated pathogenicity in a United States, majority African American cohort. We prospectively collected fecal samples from 50 SARS-CoV-2 infected patients, 9 SARS-CoV-2 recovered patients, and 34 uninfected subjects seen by the hospital with unrelated respiratory medical conditions (controls). 16S rRNA sequencing and qPCR analysis was performed on fecal DNA/RNA. The fecal microbial composition was found to be significantly different between SARS-CoV-2 patients and controls (PERMANOVA FDR-P = .004), independent of antibiotic exposure. Peptoniphilus, Corynebacterium and Campylobacter were identified as the three most significantly enriched genera in COVID-19 patients compared to controls. Actively infected patients were also found to have a different gut microbiota than recovered patients (PERMANOVA FDR-P = .003), and the most enriched genus in infected patients was Campylobacter, with Agathobacter and Faecalibacterium being enriched in the recovered patients. No difference in microbial community structure between recovered patients and uninfected controls was observed, nor a difference in alpha diversity between the three groups. 24 of the 50 COVID-19 patients (48%) tested positive via RT-qPCR for fecal SARS-CoV-2 RNA. A significant difference in gut microbial composition between SARS-CoV-2 positive and negative samples was observed, with Klebsiella and Agathobacter being enriched in the positive cohort. No significant associations between microbiome composition and disease severity was found. The intestinal microbiota is sensitive to the presence of SARS-CoV-2, with increased relative abundance of genera (Campylobacter, Klebsiella) associated with gastrointestinal (GI) disease. Further studies are needed to investigate the functional impact of SARS-CoV-2 on GI health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Feces/microbiology , Feces/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
19.
Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) ; 26(6): 135-148, 2021 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281062

ABSTRACT

The human body is colonized from the birth by a large number of microorganisms. This will constitute a real "functional microbial organ" that is fundamental for homeostasis and therefore for health in humans. Those microorganisms. The microbial populations that colonize humans creating a specific ecosystem they have been collectively referred to as "human microbiota" or "human normal microflora". The microbiota play an important pathophysiological role in the various locations of the human body. This article focuses on one of the most important, that is the enteric microbiota. The composition (quantitative and qualitative) of microbes is analyzed in relation to age and environment during the course of human life. It also highlights eubiosis and dysbiosis as key terms for its role in health and disease. Finally, it analyzes its bi-directional relationship with the microbiota of the lungs, skin and that of the brain, and consequently for the whole central and peripheral nervous system for the maintenance of health in the human body.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Health Status , Homeostasis/physiology , Bacteria/classification , Brain/physiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Tract/physiology , Humans , Lung/physiology , Population Dynamics
20.
Nature ; 594(7862): 234-239, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269388

ABSTRACT

Loss of gut microbial diversity1-6 in industrial populations is associated with chronic diseases7, underscoring the importance of studying our ancestral gut microbiome. However, relatively little is known about the composition of pre-industrial gut microbiomes. Here we performed a large-scale de novo assembly of microbial genomes from palaeofaeces. From eight authenticated human palaeofaeces samples (1,000-2,000 years old) with well-preserved DNA from southwestern USA and Mexico, we reconstructed 498 medium- and high-quality microbial genomes. Among the 181 genomes with the strongest evidence of being ancient and of human gut origin, 39% represent previously undescribed species-level genome bins. Tip dating suggests an approximate diversification timeline for the key human symbiont Methanobrevibacter smithii. In comparison to 789 present-day human gut microbiome samples from eight countries, the palaeofaeces samples are more similar to non-industrialized than industrialized human gut microbiomes. Functional profiling of the palaeofaeces samples reveals a markedly lower abundance of antibiotic-resistance and mucin-degrading genes, as well as enrichment of mobile genetic elements relative to industrial gut microbiomes. This study facilitates the discovery and characterization of previously undescribed gut microorganisms from ancient microbiomes and the investigation of the evolutionary history of the human gut microbiota through genome reconstruction from palaeofaeces.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Biodiversity , Biological Evolution , Feces/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Genome, Bacterial/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Chronic Disease , Developed Countries , Developing Countries , Diet, Western , History, Ancient , Humans , Industrial Development/trends , Methanobrevibacter/classification , Methanobrevibacter/genetics , Methanobrevibacter/isolation & purification , Mexico , Sedentary Behavior , Southwestern United States , Species Specificity , Symbiosis
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