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1.
Crit Care Med ; 49(10): 1664-1673, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452743

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The rapid diagnosis of acute infections and sepsis remains a serious challenge. As a result of limitations in current diagnostics, guidelines recommend early antimicrobials for suspected sepsis patients to improve outcomes at a cost to antimicrobial stewardship. We aimed to develop and prospectively validate a new, 29-messenger RNA blood-based host-response classifier Inflammatix Bacterial Viral Non-Infected version 2 (IMX-BVN-2) to determine the likelihood of bacterial and viral infections. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Emergency Department, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. PATIENTS: Three hundred twelve adult patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute infections or sepsis with at least one vital sign change. INTERVENTIONS: None (observational study only). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Gene expression levels from extracted whole blood RNA was quantified on a NanoString nCounter SPRINT (NanoString Technologies, Seattle, WA). Two predicted probability scores for the presence of bacterial and viral infection were calculated using the IMX-BVN-2 neural network classifier, which was trained on an independent development set. The IMX-BVN-2 bacterial score showed an area under the receiver operating curve for adjudicated bacterial versus ruled out bacterial infection of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.85-0.95) compared with 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84-0.94) for procalcitonin with procalcitonin being used in the adjudication. The IMX-BVN-2 viral score area under the receiver operating curve for adjudicated versus ruled out viral infection was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.77-0.89). CONCLUSIONS: IMX-BVN-2 demonstrated accuracy for detecting both viral infections and bacterial infections. This shows the potential of host-response tests as a novel and practical approach for determining the causes of infections, which could improve patient outcomes while upholding antimicrobial stewardship.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , RNA, Messenger/analysis , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/physiopathology , Berlin , Biomarkers/analysis , Biomarkers/blood , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger/blood , ROC Curve , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/physiopathology
2.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 14186, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434143

ABSTRACT

Infections cause varying degrees of haemostatic dysfunction which can be detected by clot waveform analysis (CWA), a global haemostatic marker. CWA has been shown to predict poor outcomes in severe infections with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The effect of less severe bacterial and viral infections on CWA has not been established. We hypothesized that different infections influence CWA distinctively. Patients admitted with bacterial infections, dengue and upper respiratory tract viral infections were recruited if they had an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) measured on admission. APTT-based CWA was performed on Sysmex CS2100i automated analyser using Dade Actin FSL reagent. CWA parameters [(maximum velocity (min1), maximum acceleration (min2) and maximum deceleration (max2)] were compared against control patients. Infected patients (n = 101) had longer aPTT than controls (n = 112) (34.37 ± 7.72 s vs 27.80 ± 1.59 s, p < 0.001), with the mean (± SD) aPTT longest in dengue infection (n = 36) (37.99 ± 7.93 s), followed by bacterial infection (n = 52) (33.96 ± 7.33 s) and respiratory viral infection (n = 13) (29.98 ± 3.92 s). Compared to controls (min1; min2; max2) (5.53 ± 1.16%/s; 0.89 ± 0.19%/s2; 0.74 ± 0.16%/s2), bacterial infection has higher CWA results (6.92 ± 1.60%/s; 1.04 ± 0.28%/s2; 0.82 ± 0.24%/s2, all p < 0.05); dengue infection has significantly lower CWA values (3.93 ± 1.32%/s; 0.57 ± 0.17%/s2; 0.43 ± 0.14%/s2, all p < 0.001) whilst respiratory virus infection has similar results (6.19 ± 1.32%/s; 0.95 ± 0.21%/s2; 0.73 ± 0.18%/s2, all p > 0.05). CWA parameters demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein levels (min1: r = 0.54, min2: r = 0.44, max2: r = 0.34; all p < 0.01). Different infections affect CWA distinctively. CWA could provide information on the haemostatic milieu triggered by infection and further studies are needed to better define its application in this area.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/blood , Hemostasis , Partial Thromboplastin Time/methods , Virus Diseases/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Dengue/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin/blood , Respiratory Tract Infections/blood
3.
Emerg Med J ; 38(9): 685-691, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320447

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend maximal efforts to obtain blood and sputum cultures in patients with COVID-19, as bacterial coinfection is associated with worse outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of bacteriological tests, including blood and sputum cultures, and the association of multiple biomarkers and the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) with clinical and microbiological outcomes in patients with COVID-19 presenting to the emergency department (ED). METHODS: This is a substudy of a large observational cohort study (PredictED study). The PredictED included adult patients from whom a blood culture was drawn at the ED of Haga Teaching Hospital, The Netherlands. For this substudy, all patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR in March and April 2020 were included. The primary outcome was the incidence of bacterial coinfection. We used logistic regression analysis for associations of procalcitonin, C reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, lymphocyte count and PSI score with a severe disease course, defined as intensive care unit admission and/or 30-day mortality. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) quantified the discriminatory performance. RESULTS: We included 142 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. On presentation, the median duration of symptoms was 8 days. 41 (29%) patients had a severe disease course and 24 (17%) died within 30 days. The incidence of bacterial coinfection was 2/142 (1.4%). None of the blood cultures showed pathogen growth while 6.3% was contaminated. The AUCs for predicting severe disease were 0.76 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.84), 0.70 (0.61 to 0.79), 0.62 (0.51 to 0.74), 0.62 (0.51 to 0.72) and 0.72 (0.63 to 0.81) for procalcitonin, CRP, ferritin, lymphocyte count and PSI score, respectively. CONCLUSION: Blood cultures appear to have limited value while procalcitonin and the PSI appear to be promising tools in helping physicians identify patients at risk for severe disease course in COVID-19 at presentation to the ED.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacteriological Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacteriological Techniques/statistics & numerical data , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Ferritins/blood , Humans , Incidence , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Procalcitonin/blood , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 691879, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282387

ABSTRACT

Increasing human Adenovirus (HAdV) infections complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) even fatal outcome were reported in immunocompetent adolescent and adult patients. Here, we characterized the cytokine/chemokine expression profiles of immunocompetent patients complicated with ARDS during HAdV infection and identified biomarkers for disease severity/progression. Forty-eight cytokines/chemokines in the plasma samples from 19 HAdV-infected immunocompetent adolescent and adult patients (ten complicated with ARDS) were measured and analyzed in combination with clinical indices. Immunocompetent patients with ARDS caused by severe acute respiratory disease coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (panH1N1) or bacteria were included for comparative analyses. Similar indices of disease course/progression were found in immunocompetent patients with ARDS caused by HAdV, SARS-CoV-2 or panH1N infections, whereas the HAdV-infected group showed a higher prevalence of viremia, as well as increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK). Expression levels of 33 cytokines/chemokines were increased significantly in HAdV-infected patients with ARDS compared with that in healthy controls, and many of them were also significantly higher than those in SARS-CoV-2-infected and panH1N1-infected patients. Expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1ß, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), IL-6, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), IL-10, IL-1α and IL-2Ra was significantly higher in HAdV-infected patients with ARDS than that in those without ARDS, and negatively associated with the ratio of the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2). Analyses of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) showed that expression of IL-10, M-CSF, MIG, HGF, IL-1ß, IFN-γ and IL-2Ra could predict the progression of HAdV infection, with the highest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.944 obtained for IL-10. Of note, the AUC value for the combination of IL-10, IFN-γ, and M-CSF reached 1. In conclusion, the "cytokine storm" occurred during HAdV infection in immunocompetent patients, and expression of IL-10, M-CSF, MIG, HGF, IL-1ß, IFN-γ and IL-2Ra was closely associated with disease severity and could predict disease progression.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Adenovirus Infections, Human/complications , Adenovirus Infections, Human/pathology , Adenoviruses, Human , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/pathology , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Viremia/blood , Viremia/complications , Viremia/pathology , Young Adult
5.
Ann Clin Biochem ; 58(5): 520-527, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The variability of Covid-19 severity between patients has driven efforts to identify prognosticating laboratory markers that could aid clinical decision-making. Procalcitonin is classically used as a diagnostic marker in bacterial infections, but its role in predicting Covid-19 disease severity is emerging. We aimed to identify the association between procalcitonin and Covid-19 disease severity in a critical care setting and whether bacterial co-infection is implicated. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed Covid-19 patients with procalcitonin concentrations measured in a critical care setting at our institution between February and September 2020. Laboratory markers including peak procalcitonin values and a range of bacterial culture results were analysed. Outcomes were the requirement and duration of invasive mechanical ventilation as well as inpatient mortality. RESULTS: In total, 60 patients were included; 68% required invasive mechanical ventilation and 45% died as inpatient. Univariate analysis identified higher peak procalcitonin concentrations significantly associated with both the requirement for invasive mechanical ventilation (OR: 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-9.0, P = 0.02) and inpatient mortality (OR: 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.6, P = 0.03). Higher peak procalcitonin concentrations was an independent predictor of mortality on multivariate analysis (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1-12.4, P = 0.03). There was a significant positive correlation between increased peak procalcitonin concentrations and duration on invasive mechanical ventilation. No significant difference was found between peak procalcitonin concentrations of patients with positive and negative bacterial cultures. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated procalcitonin concentrations in Covid-19 patients are associated with respiratory failure requiring prolonged invasive mechanical ventilation and inpatient mortality. This association may be independent of bacterial co-infection.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/blood , Critical Care , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(9): 1983-1997, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263157

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 antibody assays are used for epidemiological studies and for the assessment of vaccine responses in highly vulnerable patients. So far, data on cross-reactivity of SARS-CoV-2 antibody assays is limited. Here, we compared four enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs; Vircell SARS-CoV-2 IgM/IgA and IgG, Euroimmun SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG) for detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in 207 patients with COVID-19, 178 patients with serological evidence of different bacterial infections, 107 patients with confirmed viral respiratory disease, and 80 controls from the pre-COVID-19 era. In COVID-19 patients, the assays showed highest sensitivity in week 3 (Vircell-IgM/A and Euroimmun-IgA: 78.9% each) and after week 7 (Vircell-IgG: 97.9%; Euroimmun-IgG: 92.1%). The antibody indices were higher in patients with fatal disease. In general, IgM/IgA assays had only limited or no benefit over IgG assays. In patients with non-SARS-CoV-2 respiratory infections, IgG assays were more specific than IgM/IgA assays, and bacterial infections were associated with more false-positive results than viral infections. The specificities in bacterial and viral infections were 68.0 and 81.3% (Vircell-IgM/IgA), 84.8 and 96.3% (Euroimmun-IgA), 97.8 and 86.0% (Vircell-IgG), and 97.8 and 99.1% (Euroimmun-IgG), respectively. Sera from patients positive for antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Legionella pneumophila yielded particularly high rates of unspecific false-positive results in the IgM/IgA assays, which was revealed by applying a highly specific flow-cytometric assay using HEK 293 T cells expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Positive results obtained with anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM/IgA ELISAs require careful interpretation, especially if there is evidence for prior bacterial respiratory infections.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Antibodies, Bacterial/blood , Bacterial Infections/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Respiratory Tract Infections/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
7.
EBioMedicine ; 67: 103352, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Precise differential diagnosis between acute viral and bacterial infections is important to enable appropriate therapy, avoid unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions and optimize the use of hospital resources. A systems view of host response to infections provides opportunities for discovering sensitive and robust molecular diagnostics. METHODS: We combine blood transcriptomes from six independent datasets (n = 756) with a knowledge-based human protein-protein interaction network, identifies subnetworks capturing host response to each infection class, and derives common response cores separately for viral and bacterial infections. We subject the subnetworks to a series of computational filters to identify a parsimonious gene panel and a standalone diagnostic score that can be applied to individual samples. We rigorously validate the panel and the diagnostic score in a wide range of publicly available datasets and in a newly developed Bangalore-Viral Bacterial (BL-VB) cohort. FINDING: We discover a 10-gene blood-based biomarker panel (Panel-VB) that demonstrates high predictive performance to distinguish viral from bacterial infections, with a weighted mean AUROC of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.96-0.99) in eleven independent datasets (n = 898). We devise a new stand-alone patient-wise score (VB10) based on the panel, which shows high diagnostic accuracy with a weighted mean AUROC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.91-0.98) in 2996 patient samples from 56 public datasets from 19 different countries. Further, we evaluate VB10 in a newly generated South Indian (BL-VB, n = 56) cohort and find 97% accuracy in the confirmed cases of viral and bacterial infections. We find that VB10 is (a) capable of accurately identifying the infection class in culture-negative indeterminate cases, (b) reflects recovery status, and (c) is applicable across different age groups, covering a wide spectrum of acute bacterial and viral infections, including uncharacterized pathogens. We tested our VB10 score on publicly available COVID-19 data and find that our score detected viral infection in patient samples. INTERPRETATION: Our results point to the promise of VB10 as a diagnostic test for precise diagnosis of acute infections and monitoring recovery status. We expect that it will provide clinical decision support for antibiotic prescriptions and thereby aid in antibiotic stewardship efforts. FUNDING: Grand Challenges India, Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC), Department of Biotechnology, Govt. of India.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , Computational Biology/methods , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Adult , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/genetics , Databases, Factual , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Observational Studies as Topic , Predictive Value of Tests , Protein Interaction Maps , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/genetics
8.
J Hosp Infect ; 110: 103-107, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198887

ABSTRACT

It can be a diagnostic challenge to identify patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in whom antibiotics can be safely withheld. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a guideline implemented at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust that recommends withholding antibiotics in patients with low serum procalcitonin (PCT), defined as ≤0.25 ng/mL. Results showed reduced antibiotic consumption in patients with PCT ≤0.25 ng/mL with no increase in mortality, alongside a reduction in subsequent carbapenem prescriptions during admission. The results support the effectiveness of this guideline, and further research is recommended to identify the optimal cut-off value for PCT in this setting.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/standards , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/standards , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Procalcitonin/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Bacterial Infections/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Cohort Studies , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
9.
Curr Res Transl Med ; 69(2): 103289, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179993

ABSTRACT

Elevated PCT level in COVID-19 was associated with higher risk of severe disease and higher risk of overall mortality. An increased PCT level of PCT in COVID-19 patients especially in severe cases would be assumed as bacterial coinfection. Could PCT level increase in SARS-CoV-2 infection without bacterial coinfection? Several SARS-CoV-2 proteins activate STAT3-dependent transcriptional pathways particularly in monocytes, that could lead to increased PCT production. STAT3α isoform could cause increased ACE2 expression, resulting more SARS-CoV-2 infected cells and further production of PCT.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/complications , Humans , Immunity/physiology , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Procalcitonin/metabolism , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction/immunology
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 634181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177976

ABSTRACT

Bacterial respiratory tract infections are the hallmark of primary antibody deficiencies (PADs). Because they are also among the most common infections in healthy individuals, PADs are usually overlooked in these patients. Careful evaluation of the history, including frequency, chronicity, and presence of other infections, would help suspect PADs. This review will focus on infections in relatively common PADs, discussing diagnostic challenges, and some management strategies to prevent infections.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulins/deficiency , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Agammaglobulinemia/blood , Agammaglobulinemia/immunology , Agammaglobulinemia/therapy , Animals , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/blood , Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/blood , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins/blood , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/blood , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/therapy , Prognosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/blood , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
11.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 59(3): 599-607, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067439

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a dysregulated immune state. While research has focused on the hyperinflammation, little research has been performed on the compensatory anti-inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory cytokine response to COVID-19, by assessing interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-10/lymphocyte count ratio and their association with outcomes. METHODS: Adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were recruited. The primary endpoint was maximum COVID-19 severity within 30 days of index ED visit. RESULTS: A total of 52 COVID-19 patients were enrolled. IL-10 and IL-10/lymphocyte count were significantly higher in patients with severe disease (p<0.05), as well as in those who developed severe acute kidney injury (AKI) and new positive bacterial cultures (all p≤0.01). In multivariable analysis, a one-unit increase in IL-10 and IL-10/lymphocyte count were associated with 42% (p=0.031) and 32% (p=0.013) increased odds, respectively, of severe COVID-19. When standardized to a one-unit standard deviations scale, an increase in the IL-10 was a stronger predictor of maximum 30-day severity and severe AKI than increases in IL-6 or IL-8. CONCLUSIONS: The hyperinflammatory response to COVID-19 is accompanied by a simultaneous anti-inflammatory response, which is associated with poor outcomes and may increase the risk of new positive bacterial cultures. IL-10 and IL-10/lymphocyte count at ED presentation were independent predictors of COVID-19 severity. Moreover, elevated IL-10 was more strongly associated with outcomes than pro-inflammatory IL-6 or IL-8. The anti-inflammatory response in COVID-19 requires further investigation to enable more precise immunomodulatory therapy against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis
12.
Cytometry A ; 99(5): 435-445, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046850

ABSTRACT

The identification of a bacterial, viral, or even noninfectious cause is essential in the management of febrile syndrome in the emergency department (ED), especially in epidemic contexts such as flu or CoVID-19. The aim was to assess discriminative performances of two biomarkers, CD64 on neutrophils (nCD64) and CD169 on monocytes (mCD169), using a new flow cytometry procedure, in patients presenting with fever to the ED during epidemics. Eighty five adult patients presenting with potential infection were included during the 2019 flu season in the ED of La Timone Hospital. They were divided into four diagnostic outcomes according to their clinical records: no-infection, bacterial infection, viral infection and co-infection. Seventy six patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were also compared to 48 healthy volunteers. For the first cohort, 38 (45%) patients were diagnosed with bacterial infections, 11 (13%) with viral infections and 29 (34%) with co-infections. mCD169 was elevated in patients with viral infections, with a majority of Flu A virus or Respiratory Syncytial Virus, while nCD64 was elevated in subjects with bacterial infections, with a majority of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. nCD64 and mCD169 showed 90% and 80% sensitivity, and 78% and 91% specificity, respectively, for identifying patients with bacterial or viral infections. When studied in a second cohort, mCD169 was elevated in 95% of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections and remained at normal level in 100% of healthy volunteers. nCD64 and mCD169 have potential for accurately distinguishing bacterial and acute viral infections. Combined in an easy and rapid flow cytometry procedure, they constitute a potential improvement for infection management in the ED, and could even help for triage of patients during emerging epidemics.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Emergency Service, Hospital , Flow Cytometry , Monocytes/immunology , Receptors, IgG/blood , Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 1/blood , Adult , Aged , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/immunology , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/microbiology , Monocytes/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results
13.
Front Immunol ; 11: 598404, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983710

ABSTRACT

Background: Bacterial sepsis has been used as a prototype to understand the pathogenesis of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition, some management programs for critically ill COVID-19 patients are also based on experience with bacterial sepsis. However, some differences may exist between these two types of sepsis. Methods: This retrospective study investigated whether there are differences in the immune system status of these two types of sepsis. A total of 64 bacterial sepsis patients and 43 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) sepsis were included in this study. Demographic data were obtained from medical records. Laboratory results within 24 h after the diagnosis of sepsis were provided by the clinical laboratory. Results: The results of blood routine (neutrophil, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts), infection biomarkers (C-reactive protein, ferritin, and procalcitonin levels), lymphocyte subset counts (total T lymphocyte, CD4+ T cell, CD8+ T cell, B cell, and NK cell counts), and lymphocyte subset functions (the proportions of PMA/ionomycin-stimulated IFN-γ positive cells in CD4+, CD8+ T cells, and NK cells) were similar in bacterial sepsis patients and SARS-CoV-2 sepsis patients. Cytokine storm was milder, and immunoglobulin and complement protein levels were higher in SARS-CoV-2 sepsis patients. Conclusions: There are both similarities and differences in the immune system status of bacterial sepsis and SARS-CoV-2 sepsis. Our findings do not support blocking the cytokine storm or supplementing immunoglobulins in SARS-CoV-2 sepsis, at least in the early stages of the disease. Treatments for overactivation of the complement system and lymphocyte depletion may be worth exploring further.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Lymphocyte Subsets , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis , Adult , Aged , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/immunology
14.
Clin Chim Acta ; 513: 13-16, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Sepsis is a leading cause of maternal death, and developing diagnostic tests for infection is increasingly important to reduce maternal mortality. The existing inflammatory markers, like C-reactive protein, are not specific for infection, which introduces diagnostic uncertainty. Procalcitonin (PCT) is used to accurately diagnose bacterial sepsis and differentiate it from other conditions, which is now particularly important given the vulnerability to COVID-19 in pregnancy. There are few studies of PCT in pregnancy as the reference interval for pregnant women is unknown. This study aimed to define the pregnancy-specific reference interval for PCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 323 healthy pregnant women, with longitudinal sampling in each trimester. RESULTS: The upper reference limit for PCT was 0.05 ng/mL and did not vary materially between any observed group of gestational age, body mass index, maternal age, mean arterial blood pressure or fetal sex. CONCLUSION: Our study has shown that levels of PCT are similar in pregnant and non-pregnant populations despite the physiological changes of normal pregnancy. Therefore, pregnancy should not preclude the use of PCT in pregnant women with suspected sepsis, or for guiding antibiotic therapy in women with a diagnosed bacterial infection at any stage of pregnancy.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Procalcitonin/blood , Adult , Bacterial Infections/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Trimesters , Procalcitonin/standards , Reference Values , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
15.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 59(2): 433-440, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962382

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Procalcitonin (PCT) has been proposed for differentiating viral vs. bacterial infections. In COVID-19, some preliminary results have shown that PCT testing could act as a predictor of bacterial co-infection and be a useful marker for assessment of disease severity. Methods: We studied 83 COVID-19 hospitalized patients in whom PCT was specifically ordered by attending physicians. PCT results were evaluated according to the ability to accurately predict bacterial co-infections and death in comparison with other known biomarkers of infection and with major laboratory predictors of COVID-19 severity. Results: Thirty-three (39.8%) patients suffered an in-hospital bacterial co-infection and 44 (53.0%) patients died. In predicting bacterial co-infection, PCT showed a relatively low accuracy (area under receiver-operating characteristic [ROC] curve [AUC]: 0.757; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.651-0.845), with a strength for detecting the outcome not significantly different from that of white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP). In predicting patient death, PCT showed an AUC of 0.815 (CI: 0.714-0.892), not better than those of other more common laboratory tests, such as blood lymphocyte percentage (AUC: 0.874, p=0.19), serum lactate dehydrogenase (AUC: 0.860, p=0.47), blood neutrophil count (AUC: 0.845, p=0.59), and serum albumin (AUC: 0.839, p=0.73). Conclusions: Procalcitonin (PCT) testing, even when appropriately ordered, did not provide a significant added value in COVID-19 patients when compared with more consolidated biomarkers of infection and poor clinical outcome. The major application of PCT in COVID-19 is its ability, associated with a negative predictive value >90%, to exclude a bacterial co-infection when a rule-out cut-off (<0.25 µg/L) is applied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Procalcitonin/blood , Aged , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacterial Infections/mortality , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , ROC Curve , Regression Analysis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Blood Purif ; 50(1): 28-34, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624949

ABSTRACT

In April 2020, the US Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization for certain medical devices to be used in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (CO-VID-19). This included extracorporeal blood purification devices. This narrative review will give a brief overview regarding some of the extracorporeal devices that could be used to treat COVID-19 patients, including the Seraph® 100 Microbind® Affinity Blood Filter, produced by ExThera Medical (Martinez, CA, USA), first licensed in the European Economic Area in 2019. The Seraph® 100 contains ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene beads with end point-attached heparin and is approved for the reduction of pathogens from the bloodstream either as a single agent or as an adjunct to conventional anti-infective agents. Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and toxins have been shown to bind to the immobilized heparin in a similar way to the interaction with heparan sulfate on the cell surface. This binding is nonreversible and as such, the pathogens are removed from the bloodstream. In this review, we describe the pathophysiological basis and rationale for using heparin for pathogen removal from the blood as well as exploring the technology behind the adaptation of heparin to deprive it of its systemic anticoagulant activity. In addition, we summarize the in vitro data as well as the available preclinical testing and published clinical reports. Finally, we discuss the enormous potential of this technology in an era of increasing antibiotic resistance and high mortality associated with sepsis and consider the application of this as a possible treatment option for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/chemistry , Bacterial Infections/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Hemoperfusion/methods , Heparin/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/blood , Binding Sites , COVID-19/blood , Humans
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