Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 54
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 155, 2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We defined the frequency of respiratory community-acquired bacterial co-infection in patients with COVID-19, i.e. patients with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR or a COVID-19 Reporting and Data System (CO-RADS) score ≥ 4, based on a complete clinical assessment, including prior antibiotic use, clinical characteristics, inflammatory markers, chest computed tomography (CT) results and microbiological test results. METHODS: Our retrospective study was conducted within a cohort of prospectively included patients admitted for COVID-19 in our tertiary medical centres between 1-3-2020 and 1-6-2020. A multidisciplinary study team developed a diagnostic protocol to retrospectively categorize patients as unlikely, possible or probable bacterial co-infection based on clinical, radiological and microbiological parameters in the first 72 h of admission. Within the three categories, we summarized patient characteristics and antibiotic consumption. RESULTS: Among 281 included COVID-19 patients, bacterial co-infection was classified as unlikely in 233 patients (82.9%), possible in 35 patients (12.4%) and probable in 3 patients (1.1%). Ten patients (3.6%) could not be classified due to inconclusive data. Within 72 h of hospital admission, 81% of the total study population and 78% of patients classified as unlikely bacterial co-infection received antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients are unlikely to have a respiratory community-acquired bacterial co-infection. This study underpins recommendations for restrictive use of antibacterial drugs in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Coinfection/drug therapy , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Toxins (Basel) ; 12(4)2020 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453289

ABSTRACT

Bacterial toxins play a key role in the pathogenesis of lung disease. Based on their structural and functional properties, they employ various strategies to modulate lung barrier function and to impair host defense in order to promote infection. Although in general, these toxins target common cellular signaling pathways and host compartments, toxin- and cell-specific effects have also been reported. Toxins can affect resident pulmonary cells involved in alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) and barrier function through impairing vectorial Na+ transport and through cytoskeletal collapse, as such, destroying cell-cell adhesions. The resulting loss of alveolar-capillary barrier integrity and fluid clearance capacity will induce capillary leak and foster edema formation, which will in turn impair gas exchange and endanger the survival of the host. Toxins modulate or neutralize protective host cell mechanisms of both the innate and adaptive immunity response during chronic infection. In particular, toxins can either recruit or kill central players of the lung's innate immune responses to pathogenic attacks, i.e., alveolar macrophages (AMs) and neutrophils. Pulmonary disorders resulting from these toxin actions include, e.g., acute lung injury (ALI), the acute respiratory syndrome (ARDS), and severe pneumonia. When acute infection converts to persistence, i.e., colonization and chronic infection, lung diseases, such as bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) can arise. The aim of this review is to discuss the impact of bacterial toxins in the lungs and the resulting outcomes for pathogenesis, their roles in promoting bacterial dissemination, and bacterial survival in disease progression.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/pathogenicity , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Toxins/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Bacteria/immunology , Bacteria/metabolism , Bacterial Infections/immunology , Bacterial Infections/metabolism , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Disease Progression , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/metabolism , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Signal Transduction
3.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5026, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363491

ABSTRACT

Nationwide prospective surveillance of all-age patients with acute respiratory infections was conducted in China between 2009‒2019. Here we report the etiological and epidemiological features of the 231,107 eligible patients enrolled in this analysis. Children <5 years old and school-age children have the highest viral positivity rate (46.9%) and bacterial positivity rate (30.9%). Influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus are the three leading viral pathogens with proportions of 28.5%, 16.8% and 16.7%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the three leading bacterial pathogens (29.9%, 18.6% and 15.8%). Negative interactions between viruses and positive interactions between viral and bacterial pathogens are common. A Join-Point analysis reveals the age-specific positivity rate and how this varied for individual pathogens. These data indicate that differential priorities for diagnosis, prevention and control should be highlighted in terms of acute respiratory tract infection patients' demography, geographic locations and season of illness in China.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Young Adult
4.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 69, 2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 causes COVID-19 illness which can progress to severe pneumonia. Empiric antibacterials are often employed though frequency of bacterial coinfection superinfection is debated and concerns raised about selection of bacterial antimicrobial resistance. We evaluated sputum bacterial and fungal growth from 165 intubated COVID-19 pneumonia patients. Objectives were to determine frequency of culture positivity, risk factors for and outcomes of positive cultures, and timing of antimicrobial resistance development. METHODS: Retrospective reviews were conducted of COVID-19 pneumonia patients requiring intubation admitted to a 1058-bed four community hospital system on the east coast United States, March 1 to May 1, 2020. Length of stay (LOS) was expressed as mean (standard deviation); 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was computed for overall mortality rate using the exact binomial method, and overall mortality was compared across each level of a potential risk factor using a Chi-Square Test of Independence. All tests were two-sided, and significance level was set to 0.05. RESULTS: Average patient age was 68.7 years and LOS 19.9 days. Eighty-three patients (50.3% of total) originated from home, 10 from group homes (6.1% of total), and 72 from nursing facilities (43.6% of total). Mortality was 62.4%, highest for nursing home residents (80.6%). Findings from 253 sputum cultures overall did not suggest acute bacterial or fungal infection in 73 (45%) of 165 individuals sampled within 24 h of intubation. Cultures ≥ 1 week following intubation did grow potential pathogens in 72 (64.9%) of 111 cases with 70.8% consistent with late pneumonia and 29.2% suggesting colonization. Twelve (10.8% of total) of these late post-intubation cultures revealed worsened antimicrobial resistance predominantly in Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, or Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS: In severe COVID-19 pneumonia, a radiographic ground glass interstitial pattern and lack of purulent sputum prior to/around the time of intubation correlated with no culture growth or recovery of normal oral flora ± yeast. Discontinuation of empiric antibacterials should be considered in these patients aided by other clinical findings, history of prior antimicrobials, laboratory testing, and overall clinical course. Continuing longterm hospitalisation and antibiotics are associated with sputum cultures reflective of hospital-acquired microbes and increasing antimicrobial resistance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable as this was a retrospective chart review study without interventional arm.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cross Infection/complications , Fungi/drug effects , Mycoses/complications , Pneumonia/therapy , Sputum/microbiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/drug therapy , Cross Infection/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Fungal , Female , Fungi/genetics , Fungi/isolation & purification , Hospitalization , Humans , Intubation , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/microbiology , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/mortality , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
Biochem Soc Trans ; 49(5): 2411-2429, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397910

ABSTRACT

The importance of vaccine-induced protection was repeatedly demonstrated over the last three decades and emphasized during the recent COVID-19 pandemic as the safest and most effective way of preventing infectious diseases. Vaccines have controlled, and in some cases, eradicated global viral and bacterial infections with high efficiency and at a relatively low cost. Carbohydrates form the capsular sugar coat that surrounds the outer surface of human pathogenic bacteria. Specific surface-exposed bacterial carbohydrates serve as potent vaccine targets that broadened our toolbox against bacterial infections. Since first approved for commercial use, antibacterial carbohydrate-based vaccines mostly rely on inherently complex and heterogenous naturally derived polysaccharides, challenging to obtain in a pure, safe, and cost-effective manner. The introduction of synthetic fragments identical with bacterial capsular polysaccharides provided well-defined and homogenous structures that resolved many challenges of purified polysaccharides. The success of semisynthetic glycoconjugate vaccines against bacterial infections, now in different phases of clinical trials, opened up new possibilities and encouraged further development towards fully synthetic antibacterial vaccine solutions. In this mini-review, we describe the recent achievements in semi- and fully synthetic carbohydrate vaccines against a range of human pathogenic bacteria, focusing on preclinical and clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/immunology , Bacteria/immunology , Bacterial Infections/immunology , Carbohydrates/immunology , Glycoconjugates/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Carbohydrate Sequence , Carbohydrates/chemistry , Glycoconjugates/chemistry , Glycoconjugates/therapeutic use , Humans , Vaccines, Synthetic/chemistry , Vaccines, Synthetic/therapeutic use
6.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol ; 60(2): 259-270, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384600

ABSTRACT

Ultraviolet blood irradiation (UBI) was used with success in the 1930s and 1940s for a variety of diseases. Despite the success, the lack of understanding of the detailed mechanisms of actions, and the achievements of antibiotics, phased off the use of UBI from the 1950s. The emergence of novel viral infections, from HIV/AIDS to Ebola, from SARS and MERS, and SARS-CoV-2, bring back the attention to this therapeutical opportunity. UBI has a complex virucidal activity, mostly acting on the immune system response. It has effects on lymphocytes (T-cells and B-cells), macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and lipids. The Knott technique was applied for bacterial infections such as tuberculosis to viral infections such as hepatitis or influenza. The more complex extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is also being applied to hematological cancers such as T-cell lymphomas. Further studies of UBI may help to create a useful device that may find applications for novel viruses that are resistant to known antivirals or vaccines, or also bacteria that are resistant to known antibiotics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Photopheresis/methods , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Ultraviolet Rays , Bacteria/radiation effects , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/radiation effects , Humans , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/radiation effects , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/radiation effects , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/radiation effects , Signal Transduction/immunology , Signal Transduction/radiation effects , Treatment Outcome
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16069, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356580

ABSTRACT

Point-of-care testing is cost-effective, rapid, and could assist in avoiding hospital visits during a pandemic. However, they present some significant risks that current technologies cannot fully address. Skin flora contamination and insufficient specimen volume are two major limitations preventing self-collection microbiological testing outside of hospital settings. We are developing a hybrid testing procedure to bridge the laboratory test with patient-side specimen collection and transportation for molecular microbial classification of causative bacterial infection and early identification of microbial susceptibility profiles directly from whole blood or urine specimens collected patient-side by health care workers such as phlebotomists in nursing homes or family clinics. This feasibility study presents our initial development efforts, in which we tested various transportation conditions (tubes, temperature, duration) for direct-from-specimen viable pathogen detection to determine the ideal conditions that allowed for differentiation between contaminant and causative bacteria in urine specimens and optimal growth for low-concentration blood specimens after transportation. For direct-from-urine assays, the viable pathogen at the clinical cutoff of 105 CFU/mL was detected after transportation with molecular assays while contaminants (≤ 104 CFU/mL) were not. For direct-from-blood assays, contrived blood samples as low as 0.8 CFU/mL were reported positive after transportation without the need for blood culture.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/growth & development , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Specimen Handling/methods , Transportation/methods , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Nursing Homes , Point-of-Care Testing , Skin/microbiology
8.
Cell Rep ; 36(9): 109637, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356160

ABSTRACT

Research conducted on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pathogenesis and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) generally focuses on the systemic host response, especially that generated by severely ill patients, with few studies investigating the impact of acute SARS-CoV-2 at the site of infection. We show that the nasal microbiome of SARS-CoV-2-positive patients (CoV+, n = 68) at the time of diagnosis is unique when compared to CoV- healthcare workers (n = 45) and CoV- outpatients (n = 21). This shift is marked by an increased abundance of bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is also positively associated with viral RNA load. Additionally, we observe a robust host transcriptional response in the nasal epithelia of CoV+ patients, indicative of an antiviral innate immune response and neuronal damage. These data suggest that the inflammatory response caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with an increased abundance of bacterial pathogens in the nasal cavity that could contribute to increased incidence of secondary bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19 , Microbiota , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Male , Middle Aged , Nose/microbiology , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Seq , Transcriptome , Viral Load , Young Adult
9.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 51, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346234

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns of bacterial pathogens in COVID-19 patients and to compare the results with control groups from the pre-pandemic and pandemic era. METHODS: Microbiological database records of all the COVID-19 diagnosed patients in the Ege University Hospital between March 15, 2020, and June 15, 2020, evaluated retrospectively. Patients who acquired secondary bacterial infections (SBIs) and bacterial co-infections were analyzed. Etiology and AMR data of the bacterial infections were collected. Results were also compared to control groups from pre-pandemic and pandemic era data. RESULTS: In total, 4859 positive culture results from 3532 patients were analyzed. Fifty-two (3.59%) patients had 78 SBIs and 38 (2.62%) patients had 45 bacterial co-infections among 1447 COVID-19 patients. 22/85 (25.88%) patients died who had bacterial infections. The respiratory culture-positive sample rate was 39.02% among all culture-positive samples in the COVID-19 group. There was a significant decrease in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacterales (8.94%) compared to samples from the pre-pandemic (20.76%) and pandemic era (20.74%) (p = 0.001 for both comparisons). Interestingly, Acinetobacter baumannii was the main pathogen in the respiratory infections of COVID-19 patients (9.76%) and the rate was significantly higher than pre-pandemic (3.49%, p < 0.002) and pandemic era control groups (3.11%, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Due to the low frequency of SBIs reported during the ongoing pandemic, a more careful and targeted antimicrobial prescription should be taken. While patients with COVID-19 had lower levels of ESBL-producing Enterobacterales, the frequency of multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii is higher.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
Emerg Med J ; 38(9): 685-691, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320447

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend maximal efforts to obtain blood and sputum cultures in patients with COVID-19, as bacterial coinfection is associated with worse outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of bacteriological tests, including blood and sputum cultures, and the association of multiple biomarkers and the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) with clinical and microbiological outcomes in patients with COVID-19 presenting to the emergency department (ED). METHODS: This is a substudy of a large observational cohort study (PredictED study). The PredictED included adult patients from whom a blood culture was drawn at the ED of Haga Teaching Hospital, The Netherlands. For this substudy, all patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR in March and April 2020 were included. The primary outcome was the incidence of bacterial coinfection. We used logistic regression analysis for associations of procalcitonin, C reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, lymphocyte count and PSI score with a severe disease course, defined as intensive care unit admission and/or 30-day mortality. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) quantified the discriminatory performance. RESULTS: We included 142 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. On presentation, the median duration of symptoms was 8 days. 41 (29%) patients had a severe disease course and 24 (17%) died within 30 days. The incidence of bacterial coinfection was 2/142 (1.4%). None of the blood cultures showed pathogen growth while 6.3% was contaminated. The AUCs for predicting severe disease were 0.76 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.84), 0.70 (0.61 to 0.79), 0.62 (0.51 to 0.74), 0.62 (0.51 to 0.72) and 0.72 (0.63 to 0.81) for procalcitonin, CRP, ferritin, lymphocyte count and PSI score, respectively. CONCLUSION: Blood cultures appear to have limited value while procalcitonin and the PSI appear to be promising tools in helping physicians identify patients at risk for severe disease course in COVID-19 at presentation to the ED.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacteriological Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacteriological Techniques/statistics & numerical data , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Ferritins/blood , Humans , Incidence , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Procalcitonin/blood , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
11.
BMC Pulm Med ; 20(1): 233, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257932

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lower respiratory tract infection (LRIs) is very common both in terms of community-acquired infection and hospital-acquired infection. Sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) are the most important specimens obtained from patients with LRI. The choice of antibiotic with which to treat LRI usually depends on the antimicrobial sensitivity of bacteria isolated from sputum and BALF. However, differences in the antimicrobial sensitivity of pathogens isolated from sputum and BALF have not been evaluated. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to analyze the differences between sputum and BALF samples in terms of pathogen isolation and antimicrobial sensitivity in hospitalized patients with LRI. RESULTS: Between 2013 and 2015, quality evaluation of sputum samples was not conducted before performing sputum culture; however, between 2016 and 2018, quality evaluation of sputum samples was conducted first, and only quality-assured samples were cultured. The numbers of sputum and BALF in 2013-2015 were 15,549 and 1671, while those in 2016-2018 were 12,055 and 3735, respectively. The results of pathogen culture showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Hemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were in the top ten pathogens isolated from sputum and BALF. An antimicrobial susceptibility test showed that the susceptibility of BALF isolates to most antibiotics was higher compared with the susceptibility of sputum isolates, especially after quality control of sputum samples (2016-2018). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that caution is needed in making therapeutic choices for patients with LRI when using antimicrobial sensitivity results from sputum isolates as opposed to BALF isolates.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Respiratory System/microbiology , Sputum/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Escherichia coli/isolation & purification , Female , Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Negative Bacteria/isolation & purification , Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Positive Bacteria/isolation & purification , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification
12.
Arch Toxicol ; 95(7): 2235-2253, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239455

ABSTRACT

Metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that affects about a quarter of the world population. MAFLD encompasses different disease stadia ranging from isolated liver steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although MAFLD is considered as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, multiple concomitant disease-potentiating factors can accelerate disease progression. Among these risk factors are diet, lifestyle, genetic traits, intake of steatogenic drugs, male gender and particular infections. Although infections often outweigh the development of fatty liver disease, pre-existing MAFLD could be triggered to progress towards more severe disease stadia. These combined disease cases might be underreported because of the high prevalence of both MAFLD and infectious diseases that can promote or exacerbate fatty liver disease development. In this review, we portray the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the most relevant viral, bacterial and parasitic infections influence the progression of fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis. We focus in particular on how infectious diseases, including coronavirus disease-19, hepatitis C, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, peptic ulcer and periodontitis, exacerbate MAFLD. We specifically underscore the synergistic effects of these infections with other MAFLD-promoting factors.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , Parasitic Diseases/complications , Symptom Flare Up , Virus Diseases/complications , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/complications , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/complications , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/complications , Humans , Liver/physiopathology , Metabolic Syndrome , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/microbiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/parasitology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Parasitic Diseases/parasitology , Peptic Ulcer , Periodontitis , Risk Factors , Virus Diseases/virology
13.
Cells ; 10(5)2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223958

ABSTRACT

Sphingolipids are important structural membrane components and, together with cholesterol, are often organized in lipid rafts, where they act as signaling molecules in many cellular functions. They play crucial roles in regulating pathobiological processes, such as cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. The bioactive metabolites ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and sphingosine have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of several microbes. In contrast to ceramide, which often promotes bacterial and viral infections (for instance, by mediating adhesion and internalization), sphingosine, which is released from ceramide by the activity of ceramidases, kills many bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. In particular, sphingosine is an important natural component of the defense against bacterial pathogens in the respiratory tract. Pathologically reduced sphingosine levels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells are normalized by inhalation of sphingosine, and coating plastic implants with sphingosine prevents bacterial infections. Pretreatment of cells with exogenous sphingosine also prevents the viral spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) from interacting with host cell receptors and inhibits the propagation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in macrophages. Recent examinations reveal that the bactericidal effect of sphingosine might be due to bacterial membrane permeabilization and the subsequent death of the bacteria.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/immunology , Mycoses/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Sphingosine/metabolism , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/metabolism , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Cell Wall/drug effects , Ceramides/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Herpesvirus 1, Human/immunology , Humans , Lysophospholipids/metabolism , Membrane Microdomains/immunology , Membrane Microdomains/metabolism , Mycoses/drug therapy , Mycoses/metabolism , Mycoses/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sphingolipids/metabolism , Sphingosine/analogs & derivatives , Sphingosine/pharmacology , Sphingosine/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology
14.
Trends Microbiol ; 29(10): 930-941, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211155

ABSTRACT

Bacterial coinfections increase the severity of respiratory viral infections and were frequent causes of mortality in influenza pandemics but have not been well characterized in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this review was to identify the frequency and microbial etiologies of bacterial coinfections that are present upon admission to the hospital and that occur during hospitalization for COVID-19. We found that bacterial coinfections were present in <4% of patients upon admission and the yield of routine diagnostic tests for pneumonia was low. When bacterial coinfections did occur, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae were the most common pathogens and atypical bacteria were rare. Although uncommon upon admission, bacterial infections frequently occurred in patients with prolonged hospitalization, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp., and S. aureus were common pathogens. Antibacterial therapy and diagnostic testing for bacterial infections are unnecessary upon admission in most patients hospitalized with COVID-19, but clinicians should be vigilant for nosocomial bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Physiological Phenomena , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
15.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(2): 145-167, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207907

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: Point-of-care testing (POCT) is inherently spatial, that is, performed where needed, and intrinsically temporal, because it accelerates decision-making. POCT efficiency and effectiveness have the potential to facilitate antimicrobial resistance (AMR) detection, decrease risks of coinfections for critically ill patients with coronavirus infectious disease 2019 (COVID-19), and improve the cost-effectiveness of health care. OBJECTIVES.­: To assess AMR identification by using POCT, describe the United States AMR Diagnostic Challenge, and improve global standards of care for infectious diseases. DATA SOURCES.­: PubMed, World Wide Web, and other sources were searched for papers focusing on AMR and POCT. EndNote X9.1 (Clarivate Analytics) consolidated abstracts, URLs, and PDFs representing approximately 500 articles were assessed for relevance. Panelist insights at Tri•Con 2020 in San Francisco and finalist POC technologies competing for a US $20,000,000 AMR prize are summarized. CONCLUSIONS.­: Coinfections represent high risks for COVID-19 patients. POCT potentially will help target specific pathogens, refine choices for antimicrobial drugs, and prevent excess morbidity and mortality. POC assays that identify patterns of pathogen resistance can help tell us how infected individuals spread AMR, where geospatial hotspots are located, when delays cause death, and how to deploy preventative resources. Shared AMR data "clouds" could help reduce critical care burden during pandemics and optimize therapeutic options, similar to use of antibiograms in individual hospitals. Multidisciplinary health care personnel should learn the principles and practice of POCT, so they can meet needs with rapid diagnostic testing. The stakes are high. Antimicrobial resistance is projected to cause millions of deaths annually and cumulative financial loses in the trillions by 2050.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Resistance, Fungal , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/methods , Point-of-Care Systems , Awards and Prizes , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Coinfection/diagnosis , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/standards , Mycoses/diagnosis , Mycoses/microbiology , Point-of-Care Systems/standards , Spatial Analysis , United States/epidemiology
17.
J Med Microbiol ; 70(4)2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189541

ABSTRACT

Introduction. During previous viral pandemics, reported co-infection rates and implicated pathogens have varied. In the 1918 influenza pandemic, a large proportion of severe illness and death was complicated by bacterial co-infection, predominantly Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.Gap statement. A better understanding of the incidence of co-infection in patients with COVID-19 infection and the pathogens involved is necessary for effective antimicrobial stewardship.Aim. To describe the incidence and nature of co-infection in critically ill adults with COVID-19 infection in England.Methodology. A retrospective cohort study of adults with COVID-19 admitted to seven intensive care units (ICUs) in England up to 18 May 2020, was performed. Patients with completed ICU stays were included. The proportion and type of organisms were determined at <48 and >48 h following hospital admission, corresponding to community and hospital-acquired co-infections.Results. Of 254 patients studied (median age 59 years (IQR 49-69); 64.6 % male), 139 clinically significant organisms were identified from 83 (32.7 %) patients. Bacterial co-infections/ co-colonisation were identified within 48 h of admission in 14 (5.5 %) patients; the commonest pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (four patients) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (two patients). The proportion of pathogens detected increased with duration of ICU stay, consisting largely of Gram-negative bacteria, particularly Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The co-infection/ co-colonisation rate >48 h after admission was 27/1000 person-days (95 % CI 21.3-34.1). Patients with co-infections/ co-colonisation were more likely to die in ICU (crude OR 1.78,95 % CI 1.03-3.08, P=0.04) compared to those without co-infections/ co-colonisation.Conclusion. We found limited evidence for community-acquired bacterial co-infection in hospitalised adults with COVID-19, but a high rate of Gram-negative infection acquired during ICU stay.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Critical Illness , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/microbiology , England/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 634181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177976

ABSTRACT

Bacterial respiratory tract infections are the hallmark of primary antibody deficiencies (PADs). Because they are also among the most common infections in healthy individuals, PADs are usually overlooked in these patients. Careful evaluation of the history, including frequency, chronicity, and presence of other infections, would help suspect PADs. This review will focus on infections in relatively common PADs, discussing diagnostic challenges, and some management strategies to prevent infections.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulins/deficiency , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Agammaglobulinemia/blood , Agammaglobulinemia/immunology , Agammaglobulinemia/therapy , Animals , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/blood , Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/blood , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins/blood , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/blood , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/therapy , Prognosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/blood , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
19.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(10): 2227-2234, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139366

ABSTRACT

Because the diagnosis of co/superinfection in COVID-19 patients is challenging, empirical antibiotic therapy is frequently initiated until microbiological analysis results. We evaluated the performance and the impact of the BioFire® FilmArray® Pneumonia plus Panel on 112 respiratory samples from 67 COVID-19 ICU patients suspected of co/superinfections. Globally, the sensitivity and specificity of the test were 89.3% and 99.1%, respectively. Positive tests led to antibiotic initiation or adaptation in 15% of episodes and de-escalation in 4%. When negative, 28% of episodes remained antibiotic-free (14% no initiation, 14% withdrawal). Rapid multiplex PCRs can help to improve antibiotic stewardship by administering appropriate antibiotics earlier and avoiding unnecessary prescriptions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Aged , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
20.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(4): e159-e161, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132631

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection is characterized by fever, elevated inflammatory markers, and multisystem organ involvement. Presentations are variable but often include gastrointestinal symptoms. We describe 5 children with fever and gastrointestinal symptoms initially concerning for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children who were ultimately diagnosed with bacterial enteritis, highlighting the diagnostic challenges presented by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Enteritis/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Biomarkers , Child , Child, Preschool , Diagnosis, Differential , Diagnostic Errors , Enteritis/microbiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Symptom Assessment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...