Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 23
Filter
1.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(7): 8718-8727, 2022 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683917

ABSTRACT

Transparent antimicrobial coatings can maintain the aesthetic appeal of surfaces and the functionality of a touch-screen while adding the benefit of reducing disease transmission. We fabricated an antimicrobial coating of silver oxide particles in a silicate matrix on glass. The matrix was grown by a modified Stöber sol-gel process with vapor-phase water and ammonia. A coating on glass with 2.4 mg of Ag2O per mm2 caused a reduction of 99.3% of SARS-CoV-2 and >99.5% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared to the uncoated glass after 1 h. We envisage that screen protectors with transparent antimicrobial coatings will find particular application to communal touch-screens, such as in supermarkets and other check-out or check-in facilities where a number of individuals utilize the same touch-screen in a short interval.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Oxides/chemistry , Silver Compounds/chemistry , Ammonia/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Glass/chemistry , Humans , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/pathogenicity , Oxides/pharmacology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Silicates/chemistry , Silver Compounds/pharmacology , Water/chemistry
2.
Microb Genom ; 8(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662163

ABSTRACT

The eighth Applied Bioinformatics and Public Health Microbiology (ABPHM) conference showcased the recent acceleration of bioinformatic approaches used in public health settings. This included approaches for the surveillance of infectious diseases, understanding microbial evolution and diversity and pathogen interactions. Overall, the meeting highlighted the importance of data-driven approaches used by scientists during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computational Biology/methods , Microbiological Techniques/methods , Public Health/methods , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans
4.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 44(8): 587-598, 2021 Oct.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626213

ABSTRACT

Patients with certain immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have an increased risk of severe infectious diseases than the general population, which are mainly associated with the immunosuppressive treatments that they receive. These treatments act on the immune system through different mechanisms, causing different degrees of immunosuppression and a variable risk depending on whether the pathogen is a virus, bacteria or fungus. This article reviews the most relevant literature on the subject, which was selected and discussed by a panel of experts. The aim of this article is to review the risk of infections in patients with IBD and RA, and the potential preventive measures.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Biological Therapy/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/therapy , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , COVID-19/etiology , Hepatitis A/prevention & control , Hepatitis B/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pneumococcal Infections/prevention & control , Risk Factors , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/prevention & control , Vaccination Coverage , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
5.
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program ; 2021(1): 587-591, 2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566498

ABSTRACT

Infections are a major cause of morbidity and can result in mortality in long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Chronic graft-versus-host disease and delayed immune reconstitution are recognized risk factors. Different strategies must be utilized depending on the individual patient's situation but include prolonged antimicrobial prophylaxis and vaccination. Some important infections due to pathogens preventable by vaccination are pneumococci, influenza, varicella-zoster virus, and SARS-CoV-2. Despite the fact that such recommendations have been in place for decades, implementation of these recommendations has been reported to be poor.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mycoses/prevention & control , Vaccination , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Aged , Bacterial Infections/etiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Humans , Infections/etiology , Male , Mycoses/etiology , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects , Transplantation, Homologous/methods , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines/adverse effects , Vaccines/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/etiology
6.
Bull Cancer ; 108(12S): S90-S97, 2021 Dec.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559003

ABSTRACT

Infections occurring after CAR T-cells are a common complication. At the acute phase of treatment following CAR T-cell infusion, the exact incidence of infections is unknown given the overlapping symptoms with cytokine release syndrome. The risk factors for infection include the malignant underlying disease and its multiple treatments, and an immunosuppressive state induced by CAR-T cells themselves and the treatment of their complications. During the twelfth edition of practice harmonization workshops of the Francophone society of bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC), a working group focused its work on the management of post-CAR infectious complications. In this review we discuss anti-infection prophylaxis and vaccination of patients undergoing CAR T-cell therapy as well as a special chapter for the specific case of COVID-19. These recommendations apply to commercial CAR-T cells, in order to guide strategies for the management and prevention of infectious complications associated with this new therapeutic approach.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Mycoses/prevention & control , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Bone Marrow Transplantation , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Transplantation , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Immunization , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/adverse effects , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumocystis , Risk Factors
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(10): e2128615, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453504

ABSTRACT

Importance: The number of clinics marketing stem cell products for joint diseases, chronic pain, and most recently, COVID-19, has increased despite warnings from the US Food and Drug Administration that stem cell products for these and other indications have not been proven safe or effective. Objective: To examine bacterial infections in 20 patients who received umbilical cord blood-derived products marketed as stem cell treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case series is a national public health investigation including case-finding, medical record review and abstraction, and laboratory investigation, including sterility testing of products and whole-genome sequencing of patient and product isolates. Participants included patients who developed bacterial infections following administration of umbilical cord blood-derived products marketed as stem cell treatment during August 2017 to September 2018. Data analysis was performed from March 2019 to September 2021. Exposures: Umbilical cord blood-derived products marketed as stem cell treatment. Main Outcomes and Measures: Data were collected on patient infections and exposures. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention performed sterility testing on undistributed and distributed vials of product marketed as stem cell treatment and performed whole-genome sequencing to compare patient and product bacterial isolates. Results: Culture-confirmed bacterial infections were identified in 20 patients (median [range] age, 63 [2-89] years; 13 male patients [65%]) from 8 US states who sought stem cell treatment for conditions including pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and injury; all but 1 required hospitalization. The most frequently isolated bacteria from patients with infections were common enteric species, including Escherichia coli (14 patients) and Enterobacter cloacae (7 patients). Of unopened, undistributed products sampled for testing, 65% (22 of 34 vials) were contaminated with at least 1 of 16 bacterial species, mostly enteric. A patient isolate from Arizona matched isolates obtained from products administered to patients in Florida, and patient isolates from Texas matched undistributed product sent from the company in California. Conclusions and Relevance: Unapproved stem cell products can expose patients to serious risks without proven benefit. Sequencing results suggest a common source of extensive contamination, likely occurring during the processing of cord blood into product. Patients and health care practitioners who are considering the use of unapproved products marketed as stem cell treatment should be aware of their unproven benefits and potential risks, including serious infections.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/etiology , Blood Safety/statistics & numerical data , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Disease Outbreaks , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Blood Safety/standards , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Child , Child, Preschool , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Marketing , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Public Health Surveillance , United States/epidemiology , United States Food and Drug Administration , Young Adult
8.
Infect Dis Clin North Am ; 35(3): 789-802, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340083

ABSTRACT

A great clinical microbiology laboratory supporting a great infection prevention program requires focusing on the following services: rapid and accurate identification of pathogens associated with health care-associated infections; asymptomatic surveillance for health care-acquired pathogens before infections arise; routine use of broad and flexible antimicrobial susceptibility testing to direct optimal therapy; implementation of epidemiologic tracking tools to identify outbreaks; development of clear result communication with interpretative comments for clinicians. These goals are best realized in a collaborative relationship with the infection prevention program so that both can benefit from the shared priorities of providing the best patient care.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Laboratories, Hospital , Bacterial Infections/transmission , Humans , Laboratories/organization & administration
9.
Biochem Soc Trans ; 49(5): 2411-2429, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397910

ABSTRACT

The importance of vaccine-induced protection was repeatedly demonstrated over the last three decades and emphasized during the recent COVID-19 pandemic as the safest and most effective way of preventing infectious diseases. Vaccines have controlled, and in some cases, eradicated global viral and bacterial infections with high efficiency and at a relatively low cost. Carbohydrates form the capsular sugar coat that surrounds the outer surface of human pathogenic bacteria. Specific surface-exposed bacterial carbohydrates serve as potent vaccine targets that broadened our toolbox against bacterial infections. Since first approved for commercial use, antibacterial carbohydrate-based vaccines mostly rely on inherently complex and heterogenous naturally derived polysaccharides, challenging to obtain in a pure, safe, and cost-effective manner. The introduction of synthetic fragments identical with bacterial capsular polysaccharides provided well-defined and homogenous structures that resolved many challenges of purified polysaccharides. The success of semisynthetic glycoconjugate vaccines against bacterial infections, now in different phases of clinical trials, opened up new possibilities and encouraged further development towards fully synthetic antibacterial vaccine solutions. In this mini-review, we describe the recent achievements in semi- and fully synthetic carbohydrate vaccines against a range of human pathogenic bacteria, focusing on preclinical and clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/immunology , Bacteria/immunology , Bacterial Infections/immunology , Carbohydrates/immunology , Glycoconjugates/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Carbohydrate Sequence , Carbohydrates/chemistry , Glycoconjugates/chemistry , Glycoconjugates/therapeutic use , Humans , Vaccines, Synthetic/chemistry , Vaccines, Synthetic/therapeutic use
10.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0250854, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388910

ABSTRACT

The use of personal protective equipment (PPE) has been considered the most effective way to avoid the contamination of healthcare workers by different microorganisms, including SARS-CoV-2. A spray disinfection technology (chamber) was developed, and its efficacy in instant decontamination of previously contaminated surfaces was evaluated in two exposure times. Seven test microorganisms were prepared and inoculated on the surface of seven types of PPE (respirator mask, face shield, shoe, glove, cap, safety glasses and lab coat). The tests were performed on previously contaminated PPE using a manikin with a motion device for exposure to the chamber with biocidal agent (sodium hypochlorite) for 10 and 30s. In 96.93% of the experimental conditions analyzed, the percentage reduction was >99% (the number of viable cells found on the surface ranged from 4.3x106 to <10 CFU/mL). The samples of E. faecalis collected from the glove showed the lowest percentages reduction, with 86.000 and 86.500% for exposure times of 10 and 30 s, respectively. The log10 reduction values varied between 0.85 log10 (E. faecalis at 30 s in glove surface) and 9.69 log10 (E. coli at 10 and 30 s in lab coat surface). In general, E. coli, S. aureus, C. freundii, P. mirabilis, C. albicans and C. parapsilosis showed susceptibility to the biocidal agent under the tested conditions, with >99% reduction after 10 and 30s, while E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa showed a lower susceptibility. The 30s exposure time was more effective for the inactivation of the tested microorganisms. The results show that the spray disinfection technology has the potential for instant decontamination of PPE, which can contribute to an additional barrier for infection control of healthcare workers in the hospital environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Decontamination , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Protective Clothing , Respiratory Protective Devices , SARS-CoV-2 , Bacteria , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Bacterial Infections/transmission , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Decontamination/instrumentation , Decontamination/methods , Humans
11.
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis ; 1867(12): 166264, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385051

ABSTRACT

The molecular evolution of life on earth along with changing environmental, conditions has rendered mankind susceptible to endemic and pandemic emerging infectious diseases. The effects of certain systemic viral and bacterial infections on morbidity and mortality are considered as examples of recent emerging infections. Here we will focus on three examples of infections that are important in pregnancy and early childhood: SARS-CoV-2 virus, Zika virus, and Mycoplasma species. The basic structural characteristics of these infectious agents will be examined, along with their general pathogenic mechanisms. Coronavirus infections, such as caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, likely evolved from zoonotic bat viruses to infect humans and cause a pandemic that has been the biggest challenge for humanity since the Spanish Flu pandemic of the early 20th century. In contrast, Zika Virus infections represent an expanding infectious threat in the context of global climate change. The relationship of these infections to pregnancy, the vertical transmission and neurological sequels make these viruses highly relevant to the topics of this special issue. Finally, mycoplasmal infections have been present before mankind evolved, but they were rarely identified as human pathogens until recently, and they are now recognized as important coinfections that are able to modify the course and prognosis of various infectious diseases and other chronic illnesses. The infectious processes caused by these intracellular microorganisms are examined as well as some general aspects of their pathogeneses, clinical presentations, and diagnoses. We will finally consider examples of treatments that have been used to reduce morbidity and mortality of these infections and discuss briefly the current status of vaccines, in particular, against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. It is important to understand some of the basic features of these emerging infectious diseases and the pathogens involved in order to better appreciate the contributions of this special issue on how infectious diseases can affect human pregnancy, fetuses and neonates.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Communicable Diseases/transmission , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Bacterial Infections/history , Bacterial Infections/transmission , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Diseases/virology , Female , History, 19th Century , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/history , Mycoplasma/pathogenicity , Mycoplasma Infections/metabolism , Mycoplasma Infections/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/history , Virus Diseases/transmission , Zika Virus/pathogenicity , Zika Virus Infection/metabolism , Zika Virus Infection/prevention & control
12.
Elife ; 102021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308531

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccination is one of the most effective public health interventions. We investigate the impact of vaccination activities for Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, human papillomavirus, Japanese encephalitis, measles, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A, rotavirus, rubella, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and yellow fever over the years 2000-2030 across 112 countries. Methods: Twenty-one mathematical models estimated disease burden using standardised demographic and immunisation data. Impact was attributed to the year of vaccination through vaccine-activity-stratified impact ratios. Results: We estimate 97 (95%CrI[80, 120]) million deaths would be averted due to vaccination activities over 2000-2030, with 50 (95%CrI[41, 62]) million deaths averted by activities between 2000 and 2019. For children under-5 born between 2000 and 2030, we estimate 52 (95%CrI[41, 69]) million more deaths would occur over their lifetimes without vaccination against these diseases. Conclusions: This study represents the largest assessment of vaccine impact before COVID-19-related disruptions and provides motivation for sustaining and improving global vaccination coverage in the future. Funding: VIMC is jointly funded by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) (BMGF grant number: OPP1157270 / INV-009125). Funding from Gavi is channelled via VIMC to the Consortium's modelling groups (VIMC-funded institutions represented in this paper: Imperial College London, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Public Health England, Johns Hopkins University, The Pennsylvania State University, Center for Disease Analysis Foundation, Kaiser Permanente Washington, University of Cambridge, University of Notre Dame, Harvard University, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Emory University, National University of Singapore). Funding from BMGF was used for salaries of the Consortium secretariat (authors represented here: TBH, MJ, XL, SE-L, JT, KW, NMF, KAMG); and channelled via VIMC for travel and subsistence costs of all Consortium members (all authors). We also acknowledge funding from the UK Medical Research Council and Department for International Development, which supported aspects of VIMC's work (MRC grant number: MR/R015600/1).JHH acknowledges funding from National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship; Richard and Peggy Notebaert Premier Fellowship from the University of Notre Dame. BAL acknowledges funding from NIH/NIGMS (grant number R01 GM124280) and NIH/NIAID (grant number R01 AI112970). The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) receives funding support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.This paper was compiled by all coauthors, including two coauthors from Gavi. Other funders had no role in study design, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the report. All authors had full access to all the data in the study and had final responsibility for the decision to submit for publication.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Bacterial Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Global Health , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2 , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Humans
13.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 23(4): 208-211, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200569

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This mini review includes two case descriptions. It introduces the use of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) solutions in the prevention and cure of viral and bacterial infections. Application for the protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), rotavirus, and influenza viruses, as well as for the eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, caries, various enteric bacteria and other pathogens, and toxins have been developed. This approach is a fast, reliable, safe, and tested method for producing molecular shield and protection against emerging pathogens and epidemics. In the current pandemic situation caused by coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), this method of passive immunization could be applied for rapid protection against modifiable agents. The specific IgY antibodies start to accumulate into egg yolks about 3 weeks after the immunization of the chicken. The product can be collected safely, as the antigen is not found in the eggs. This method for microbial safety uses natural means and commonly used food substances, which have been tested and could be produced for both blocking epidemics and applying personalized medicine.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Egg Yolk/immunology , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunoglobulins/immunology , Animals , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Chickens , Humans , Immunity, Mucosal/immunology , Infant, Newborn , Virus Diseases/prevention & control
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 634181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177976

ABSTRACT

Bacterial respiratory tract infections are the hallmark of primary antibody deficiencies (PADs). Because they are also among the most common infections in healthy individuals, PADs are usually overlooked in these patients. Careful evaluation of the history, including frequency, chronicity, and presence of other infections, would help suspect PADs. This review will focus on infections in relatively common PADs, discussing diagnostic challenges, and some management strategies to prevent infections.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulins/deficiency , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Agammaglobulinemia/blood , Agammaglobulinemia/immunology , Agammaglobulinemia/therapy , Animals , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/blood , Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/blood , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins/blood , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/blood , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/therapy , Prognosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/blood , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(3)2021 01 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045425

ABSTRACT

Multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms are emerging as some of the main healthcare problems worldwide. During the COVID-19 pandemic, several Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) measures have been adopted to reduce nosocomial microorganism transmission. We performed a case-control study to identify if the incidence of MDR bacterial infections while using pandemic-related preventive measures is lower than in previous years. From 2017 to 2020, we monitored hospital discharges over a four-month period (P #) (1 March to 30 June) in St. Andrea Hospital, Rome. In total, we reported 1617 discharges. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to identify significant differences. A value of p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A significant reduction in the incidence of total MDR bacterial infections was observed during the pandemic compared to in prepandemic years (p < 0.05). We also found a significantly higher incidence of MDR bacterial infections in COVID-19 departments compared with other medical departments (29% and 19%, respectively), with extended-spectrum ß-lactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae as the pathogens presenting the highest increase. This study demonstrates that maintaining a high level of preventive measures could help tackle an important health problem such as that of the spread of MDR bacteria.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Case-Control Studies , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Rome
16.
ACS Appl Bio Mater ; 4(5): 3937-3961, 2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1026805

ABSTRACT

Bacterial infection is a universal threat to public health, which not only causes many serious diseases but also exacerbates the condition of the patients of cancer, pandemic diseases, e.g., COVID-19, and so on. Antibiotic therapy has been used to be an effective way for common bacterial disinfection. However, due to the misuse and abuse of antibiotics, more and more antibiotic-resistant bacteria have emerged as fatal threats to human beings. At present, more than 700,000 patients die every year with bacterial infections because of the lack of effective treatment. It is frustrating that the pace of development of antibiotics lags far behind that of bacterial resistance, with an estimation of 10 million deaths per year from bacterial infections after 2050. Facing such a rigorous challenge, approaches for bacterial disinfection are urgently demanded. The recently developed near-infrared (NIR) light-irradiation-based bacterial disinfection is highly promising to shatter bacterial resistance by employing NIR light-responsive materials as mediums to generate antibacterial factors such as heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and so on. This treatment approach is proved to be a potent candidate to accurately realize spatiotemporal control, while effectively eradicating multidrug-resistant bacteria and inhibiting antibiotic resistance. Herein, we summarize the latest progress of NIR light-based bacterial disinfection. Ultimately, current challenges and perspectives in this field are discussed.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/radiation effects , Disinfection/methods , Infrared Rays , Nanomedicine/trends , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Photochemotherapy , Photothermal Therapy
17.
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program ; 2020(1): 328-335, 2020 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024352

ABSTRACT

An estimated 1 million people in the United States have functional or anatomic asplenia or hyposplenia. Infectious complications due to encapsulated organisms such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae can lead to fulminant sepsis and death, particularly in young children, in the period shortly after splenectomy, and in immunocompromised patients. Patients with asplenia are also at risk for less common infections due to Capnocytophaga, Babesia, and malaria. Antibiotic prophylaxis, vaccines, and patient and family education are the mainstays of prevention in these at-risk patients. Recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis typically target high-risk periods, such as 1 to 3 years after splenectomy, children ≤5 years of age, or patients with concomitant immunocompromise. However, the risk for sepsis is lifelong, with infections occurring as late as 40 years after splenectomy. Currently available vaccines recommended for patients with asplenia include pneumococcal vaccines (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine followed by the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine), meningococcal vaccines (meningococcal conjugate vaccines for serogroups A, C, Y and W-135 and serogroup B meningococcal vaccines), H. influenzae type b vaccines, and inactivated influenza vaccines. Ongoing booster doses are also recommended for pneumococcal and meningococcal vaccines to maintain protection. Despite the availability of prevention tools, adherence is often a challenge. Dedicated teams or clinics focused on patient education and monitoring have demonstrated substantial improvements in vaccine coverage rates for individuals with asplenia and reduced risk of infection. Future efforts to monitor the quality of care in patients with asplenia may be important to bridge the know-do gap in this high-risk population.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Infection Control , Infections/etiology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/complications , Spleen/abnormalities , Vaccination , Adult , Bacterial Capsules , Bacterial Infections/chemically induced , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Child , Haemophilus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Meningococcal Vaccines/therapeutic use , Pneumococcal Vaccines/therapeutic use , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/pathology , Spleen/pathology , Splenectomy/adverse effects
18.
Nano Lett ; 21(4): 1576-1583, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960293

ABSTRACT

Recently, bioaerosols, including the 2019 novel coronavirus, pose a serious threat to global public health. Herein, we introduce a visible-light-activated (VLA) antimicrobial air filter functionalized with titanium dioxide (TiO2)-crystal violet (CV) nanocomposites facilitating abandoned visible light from sunlight or indoor lights. The TiO2-CV based VLA antimicrobial air filters exhibit a potent inactivation rate of ∼99.98% and filtration efficiency of ∼99.9% against various bioaerosols. Under visible-light, the CV is involved in overall inactivation by inducing reactive oxygen species production both directly (CV itself) and indirectly (in combination with TiO2). Moreover, the susceptibility of the CV to humidity was significantly improved by forming a hydrophobic molecular layer on the TiO2 surface, highlighting its potential applicability in real environments such as exhaled or humid air. We believe this work can open a new avenue for designing and realizing practical antimicrobial technology using ubiquitous visible-light energy against the threat of infectious bioaerosols.


Subject(s)
Air Microbiology , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/chemistry , Disinfection/methods , Gentian Violet/chemistry , Nanocomposites/chemistry , Titanium/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacteria/radiation effects , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfection/instrumentation , Filtration/instrumentation , Filtration/methods , Gentian Violet/pharmacology , Humans , Light , Nanocomposites/ultrastructure , Titanium/pharmacology , Water/chemistry
19.
J Acoust Soc Am ; 148(4): 2322, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901221

ABSTRACT

Respiratory droplets emitted during speech can transmit oral bacteria and infectious viruses to others, including COVID-19. Loud speech can generate significantly higher numbers of potentially infectious respiratory droplets. This study assessed the effect of speech volume on respiratory emission of oral bacteria as an indicator of potential pathogen transmission risk. Loud speech (average 83 dBA, peak 94 dBA) caused significantly higher emission of oral bacteria (p = 0.004 compared to no speech) within 1 ft from the speaker. N99 respirators and simple cloth masks both significantly reduced emission of oral bacteria. This study demonstrates that loud speech without face coverings increases emission of respiratory droplets that carry oral bacteria and may also carry other pathogens such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Air Microbiology , Bacteria/pathogenicity , Bacterial Infections/transmission , Inhalation Exposure , Mouth/microbiology , Respiration , Speech Acoustics , Aerosols , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Inhalation Exposure/prevention & control , Masks , Personal Protective Equipment , Respiratory Protective Devices
20.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 10: CD013686, 2020 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-847761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many dental procedures produce aerosols (droplets, droplet nuclei and splatter) that harbour various pathogenic micro-organisms and may pose a risk for the spread of infections between dentist and patient. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to greater concern about this risk. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of methods used during dental treatment procedures to minimize aerosol production and reduce or neutralize contamination in aerosols. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases on 17 September 2020: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (in the Cochrane Library, 2020, Issue 8), MEDLINE Ovid (from 1946); Embase Ovid (from 1980); the WHO COVID-19 Global literature on coronavirus disease; the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov); and the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) on aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs) performed by dental healthcare providers that evaluated methods to reduce contaminated aerosols in dental clinics (excluding preprocedural mouthrinses). The primary outcomes were incidence of infection in dental staff or patients, and reduction in volume and level of contaminated aerosols in the operative environment. The secondary outcomes were cost, accessibility and feasibility. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors screened search results, extracted data from the included studies, assessed the risk of bias in the studies, and judged the certainty of the available evidence. We used mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect estimate for continuous outcomes, and random-effects meta-analysis to combine data. We assessed heterogeneity. MAIN RESULTS: We included 16 studies with 425 participants aged 5 to 69 years. Eight studies had high risk of bias; eight had unclear risk of bias. No studies measured infection. All studies measured bacterial contamination using the surrogate outcome of colony-forming units (CFU). Two studies measured contamination per volume of air sampled at different distances from the patient's mouth, and 14 studies sampled particles on agar plates at specific distances from the patient's mouth. The results presented below should be interpreted with caution as the evidence is very low certainty due to heterogeneity, risk of bias, small sample sizes and wide confidence intervals. Moreover, we do not know the 'minimal clinically important difference' in CFU. High-volume evacuator Use of a high-volume evacuator (HVE) may reduce bacterial contamination in aerosols less than one foot (~ 30 cm) from a patient's mouth (MD -47.41, 95% CI -92.76 to -2.06; 3 RCTs, 122 participants (two studies had split-mouth design); very high heterogeneity I² = 95%), but not at longer distances (MD -1.00, -2.56 to 0.56; 1 RCT, 80 participants). One split-mouth RCT (six participants) found that HVE may not be more effective than conventional dental suction (saliva ejector or low-volume evacuator) at 40 cm (MD CFU -2.30, 95% CI -5.32 to 0.72) or 150 cm (MD -2.20, 95% CI -14.01 to 9.61). Dental isolation combination system One RCT (50 participants) found that there may be no difference in CFU between a combination system (Isolite) and a saliva ejector (low-volume evacuator) during AGPs (MD -0.31, 95% CI -0.82 to 0.20) or after AGPs (MD -0.35, -0.99 to 0.29). However, an 'n of 1' design study showed that the combination system may reduce CFU compared with rubber dam plus HVE (MD -125.20, 95% CI -174.02 to -76.38) or HVE (MD -109.30, 95% CI -153.01 to -65.59). Rubber dam One split-mouth RCT (10 participants) receiving dental treatment, found that there may be a reduction in CFU with rubber dam at one-metre (MD -16.20, 95% CI -19.36 to -13.04) and two-metre distance (MD -11.70, 95% CI -15.82 to -7.58). One RCT of 47 dental students found use of rubber dam may make no difference in CFU at the forehead (MD 0.98, 95% CI -0.73 to 2.70) and occipital region of the operator (MD 0.77, 95% CI -0.46 to 2.00). One split-mouth RCT (21 participants) found that rubber dam plus HVE may reduce CFU more than cotton roll plus HVE on the patient's chest (MD -251.00, 95% CI -267.95 to -234.05) and dental unit light (MD -12.70, 95% CI -12.85 to -12.55). Air cleaning systems One split-mouth CCT (two participants) used a local stand-alone air cleaning system (ACS), which may reduce aerosol contamination during cavity preparation (MD -66.70 CFU, 95% CI -120.15 to -13.25 per cubic metre) or ultrasonic scaling (MD -32.40, 95% CI - 51.55 to -13.25). Another CCT (50 participants) found that laminar flow in the dental clinic combined with a HEPA filter may reduce contamination approximately 76 cm from the floor (MD -483.56 CFU, 95% CI -550.02 to -417.10 per cubic feet per minute per patient) and 20 cm to 30 cm from the patient's mouth (MD -319.14 CFU, 95% CI - 385.60 to -252.68). Disinfectants ‒ antimicrobial coolants Two RCTs evaluated use of antimicrobial coolants during ultrasonic scaling. Compared with distilled water, coolant containing chlorhexidine (CHX), cinnamon extract coolant or povidone iodine may reduce CFU: CHX (MD -124.00, 95% CI -135.78 to -112.22; 20 participants), povidone iodine (MD -656.45, 95% CI -672.74 to -640.16; 40 participants), cinnamon (MD -644.55, 95% CI -668.70 to -620.40; 40 participants). CHX coolant may reduce CFU more than povidone iodine (MD -59.30, 95% CI -64.16 to -54.44; 20 participants), but not more than cinnamon extract (MD -11.90, 95% CI -35.88 to 12.08; 40 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found no studies that evaluated disease transmission via aerosols in a dental setting; and no evidence about viral contamination in aerosols. All of the included studies measured bacterial contamination using colony-forming units. There appeared to be some benefit from the interventions evaluated but the available evidence is very low certainty so we are unable to draw reliable conclusions. We did not find any studies on methods such as ventilation, ionization, ozonisation, UV light and fogging. Studies are needed that measure contamination in aerosols, size distribution of aerosols and infection transmission risk for respiratory diseases such as COVID-19 in dental patients and staff.


Subject(s)
Air Microbiology , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control, Dental/methods , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aerosols , Aged , Air Filters , Child , Child, Preschool , Colony Count, Microbial/methods , Dentistry , Disinfectants , Humans , Infection Control, Dental/economics , Infection Control, Dental/instrumentation , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Rubber Dams , Suction , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL