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1.
Surg Obes Relat Dis ; 18(6): 803-811, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has transformed surgical care, yet little is known regarding implications for bariatric surgery. OBJECTIVE: We sought to characterize the effect of COVID-19 on bariatric surgery delivery and outcomes. SETTING: The Metabolic and Bariatric Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) collects data from 885 centers in North America. METHODS: The MBSAQIP database was evaluated with 2 cohorts described: the COVID-19 and the pre-COVID-19, with patients receiving surgery in 2020 and 2015-2019, respectively. Yearly operative trends were characterized, and bivariate analysis compared demographics and postoperative outcomes. Multivariable modeling evaluated 30-day readmission, reintervention, and reoperation rates and factors associated with undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. RESULTS: We evaluated 834,647 patients, with 155,830 undergoing bariatric surgery during the 2020 pandemic year. A 12.1% reduction in total cases (177,208 in 2019 versus 155,830 in 2020; P < .001) and 13.8% reduction in cases per center occurred (204.2 cases per center in 2019 versus 176.1 cases per center in 2020; P < .001). Patients receiving bariatric surgery during the pandemic were younger and had fewer co-morbidities. Use of sleeve gastrectomy increased (74.5% versus 72.5%; P < .001), and surgery during COVID-19 was associated with reduced Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure selection (odds ratio = .83; 95% CI: .82-.84; P < .001). Length of stay decreased significantly (1.4 ± 1.4 days versus 1.6 ± 1.4 days; P < .001), yet postoperative outcomes were similar. After adjusting for co-morbidities, patients during COVID-19 had decreased 30-day odds of readmission and reintervention and a small increase in odds of reoperation. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically changed bariatric surgery delivery. Further studies evaluating the long-term effects of these changes are warranted.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Gastric Bypass , Laparoscopy , Obesity, Morbid , Bariatric Surgery/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastrectomy/methods , Gastric Bypass/methods , Humans , Laparoscopy/methods , North America/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
2.
Obes Surg ; 32(6): 1884-1894, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing bariatric surgery have high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, which may increase their vulnerability to COVID-19-related mental health distress. Exacerbation of mental health distress and disordered eating could have significant negative effects on long-term weight management and quality of life for these patients if untreated. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of a telephone-based cognitive behavioral therapy (Tele-CBT) intervention in improving depressive, anxiety, and disordered eating symptoms during COVID-19. METHODS: Participants were recruited as part of a larger randomized controlled trial study (clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT03315247) between March 2020 and March 2021 and randomized 1:1 to receive Tele-CBT or standard bariatric care. Outcomes of Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Emotional Eating Scale (EES), and Binge Eating Scale (BES) were measured at baseline, immediately post-intervention, and 3 months post-intervention. Linear mixed models were used to test the effect of intervention group, time, and group-by-time interaction for each outcome. RESULTS: Eighty-one patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Mean (SD) age of participants was 47.68 (9.36) years and 80.2% were female. There were significant group-by-time interactions for all outcomes and significant differences between groups across time. There were significant decreases in mean GAD-7 (p = 0.001), PHQ-9 (p < 0.001), EES-Total (p = 0.001), EES-Anger (p = 0.003), EES-Anxiety (p < 0.001), EES-Depression (p < 0.001), and BES (p = 0.002) scores for the Tele-CBT group at post-intervention and follow-up when compared to baseline and the control group. CONCLUSION: Tele-CBT is a feasible and effective treatment for improving psychological distress and disordered eating among post-operative bariatric surgery patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Obesity, Morbid , Bariatric Surgery/methods , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Telephone , Treatment Outcome
6.
Surg Obes Relat Dis ; 17(1): 208-214, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity is a risk factor for poor clinical outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between prior metabolic surgery and the severity of COVID-19 in patients with severe obesity. SETTING: Cleveland Clinic Health System in the United States. METHODS: Among 4365 patients who tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) between March 8, 2020 and July 22, 2020 in the Cleveland Clinic Health System, 33 patients were identified who had a prior history of metabolic surgery. The surgical patients were propensity matched 1:10 to nonsurgical patients to assemble a cohort of control patients (n = 330) with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 40 kg/m2 at the time of SARS-CoV-2 testing. The primary endpoint was the rate of hospital admission. The exploratory endpoints included admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), need for mechanical ventilation and dialysis during index hospitalization, and mortality. After propensity score matching, outcomes were compared in univariate and multivariate regression models. RESULTS: The average BMI of the surgical group was 49.1 ± 8.8 kg/m2 before metabolic surgery and was down to 37.2 ± 7.1 at the time of SARS-CoV-2 testing, compared with the control group's BMI of 46.7 ± 6.4 kg/m2. In the univariate analysis, 6 (18.2%) patients in the metabolic surgery group and 139 (42.1%) patients in the control group were admitted to the hospital (P = .013). In the multivariate analysis, a prior history of metabolic surgery was associated with a lower hospital admission rate compared with control patients with obesity (odds ratio, 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.88; P = .028). While none of the 4 exploratory outcomes occurred in the metabolic surgery group, 43 (13.0%) patients in the control group required ICU admission (P = .021), 22 (6.7%) required mechanical ventilation, 5 (1.5%) required dialysis, and 8 (2.4%) patients died. CONCLUSION: Prior metabolic surgery with subsequent weight loss and improvement of metabolic abnormalities was associated with lower rates of hospital and ICU admission in patients with obesity who became infected with SARS-CoV-2. Confirmation of these findings will require larger studies.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery/methods , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Obesity/surgery , Pandemics , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Ohio/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Updates Surg ; 72(2): 259-268, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-574895

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its related disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has been rapidly spreading all over the world and is responsible for the current pandemic. The current pandemic has found the Italian national health system unprepared to provide an appropriate and prompt response, heavily affecting surgical activities. Based on the limited data available in the literature and personal experiences, the Società Italiana di Chirurgia dell'OBesità e Malattie Metaboliche (SICOB) provides recommendations regarding the triage of bariatric surgical procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic defining a dedicated path for surgery in morbidly obese patients with known or suspected COVID-19 who may require emergency operations. Finally, the current paper delineates a strategy to resume outpatient visits and elective bariatric surgery once the acute phase of the pandemic is over. Models developed during the COVID-19 crisis should be integrated into hospital practices for future use in similar scenarios. Surgeons are presented with a golden opportunity to embrace systemic change and to drive their professional future.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Coronavirus Infections , Elective Surgical Procedures , Obesity/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quarantine , Bariatric Surgery/methods , Bariatric Surgery/standards , COVID-19 , Decision Trees , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Time Factors
8.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 8(7): 640-648, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197827

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is wreaking havoc on society, especially health-care systems, including disrupting bariatric and metabolic surgery. The current limitations on accessibility to non-urgent care undermine postoperative monitoring of patients who have undergone such operations. Furthermore, like most elective surgery, new bariatric and metabolic procedures are being postponed worldwide during the pandemic. When the outbreak abates, a backlog of people seeking these operations will exist. Hence, surgical candidates face prolonged delays of beneficial treatment. Because of the progressive nature of obesity and diabetes, delaying surgery increases risks for morbidity and mortality, thus requiring strategies to mitigate harm. The risk of harm, however, varies among patients, depending on the type and severity of their comorbidities. A triaging strategy is therefore needed. The traditional weight-centric patient-selection criteria do not favour cases based on actual clinical needs. In this Personal View, experts from the Diabetes Surgery Summit consensus conference series provide guidance for the management of patients while surgery is delayed and for postoperative surveillance. We also offer a strategy to prioritise bariatric and metabolic surgery candidates on the basis of the diseases that are most likely to be ameliorated postoperatively. Although our system will be particularly germane in the immediate future, it also provides a framework for long-term clinically meaningful prioritisation.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Obesity/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Postoperative Care/methods , Bariatric Surgery/trends , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postoperative Care/trends , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
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