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1.
mBio ; 12(5): e0237121, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440804

ABSTRACT

In 2019, a new pandemic virus belonging to the betacoronavirus family emerged, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This new coronavirus appeared in Wuhan, China, and is responsible for severe respiratory pneumonia in humans, namely, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Having infected almost 200 million people worldwide and caused more than 4.1 million deaths as of today, this new disease has raised a significant number of questions about its molecular mechanism of replication and, in particular, how infectious viral particles are produced. Although viral entry is well characterized, the full assembly steps of SARS-CoV-2 have still not been fully described. Coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, have four main structural proteins, namely, the spike glycoprotein (S), the membrane glycoprotein (M), the envelope protein (E), and the nucleocapsid protein (N). All these proteins have key roles in the process of coronavirus assembly and budding. In this review, we gathered the current knowledge about betacoronavirus structural proteins involved in viral particle assembly, membrane curvature and scission, and then egress in order to suggest and question a coherent model for SARS-CoV-2 particle production and release.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Assembly/physiology
2.
J Clin Invest ; 130(11): 6151-6157, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435146

ABSTRACT

Emerging data indicate that complement and neutrophils contribute to the maladaptive immune response that fuels hyperinflammation and thrombotic microangiopathy, thereby increasing coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) mortality. Here, we investigated how complement interacts with the platelet/neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)/thrombin axis, using COVID-19 specimens, cell-based inhibition studies, and NET/human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) cocultures. Increased plasma levels of NETs, tissue factor (TF) activity, and sC5b-9 were detected in patients. Neutrophils of patients yielded high TF expression and released NETs carrying active TF. Treatment of control neutrophils with COVID-19 platelet-rich plasma generated TF-bearing NETs that induced thrombotic activity of HAECs. Thrombin or NETosis inhibition or C5aR1 blockade attenuated platelet-mediated NET-driven thrombogenicity. COVID-19 serum induced complement activation in vitro, consistent with high complement activity in clinical samples. Complement C3 inhibition with compstatin Cp40 disrupted TF expression in neutrophils. In conclusion, we provide a mechanistic basis for a pivotal role of complement and NETs in COVID-19 immunothrombosis. This study supports strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that exploit complement or NETosis inhibition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Complement Membrane Attack Complex , Coronavirus Infections , Extracellular Traps , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Thromboplastin , Thrombosis , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Complement Activation/drug effects , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/immunology , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Peptides, Cyclic/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/blood , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombin/immunology , Thrombin/metabolism , Thromboplastin/immunology , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology
3.
Fertil Steril ; 114(2): 223-232, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385570

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the susceptibility of the endometrium to infection by-and thereby potential damage from-SARS-CoV-2. DESIGN: Analysis of SARS-Cov-2 infection-related gene expression from endometrial transcriptomic data sets. SETTING: Infertility research department affiliated with a public hospital. PATIENT(S): Gene expression data from five studies in 112 patients with normal endometrium collected throughout the menstrual cycle. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Gene expression and correlation between viral infectivity genes and age throughout the menstrual cycle. RESULT(S): Gene expression was high for TMPRSS4, CTSL, CTSB, FURIN, MX1, and BSG; medium for TMPRSS2; and low for ACE2. ACE2, TMPRSS4, CTSB, CTSL, and MX1 expression increased toward the window of implantation. TMPRSS4 expression was positively correlated with ACE2, CTSB, CTSL, MX1, and FURIN during several cycle phases; TMPRSS2 was not statistically significantly altered across the cycle. ACE2, TMPRSS4, CTSB, CTSL, BSG, and MX1 expression increased with age, especially in early phases of the cycle. CONCLUSION(S): Endometrial tissue is likely safe from SARS-CoV-2 cell entry based on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression, but susceptibility increases with age. Further, TMPRSS4, along with BSG-mediated viral entry into cells, could imply a susceptible environment for SARS-CoV-2 entry via different mechanisms. Additional studies are warranted to determine the true risk of endometrial infection by SARS-CoV-2 and implications for fertility treatments.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Endometrium/metabolism , Endometrium/virology , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Adult , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Female , Humans , Menstrual Cycle , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/biosynthesis , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
4.
Sci Adv ; 6(28): eabb8097, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388430

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of respiratory illness caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus associated with multiple organ failures is spreading rapidly because of its contagious human-to-human transmission and inadequate globalhealth care systems. Pharmaceutical repurposing, an effective drug development technique using existing drugs, could shorten development time and reduce costs compared to those of de novo drug discovery. We carried out virtual screening of antiviral compounds targeting the spike glycoprotein (S), main protease (Mpro), and the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD)-angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) complex of SARS-CoV-2. PC786, an antiviral polymerase inhibitor, showed enhanced binding affinity to all the targets. Furthermore, the postfusion conformation of the trimeric S protein RBD with ACE2 revealed conformational changes associated with PC786 drug binding. Exploiting immunoinformatics to identify T cell and B cell epitopes could guide future experimental studies with a higher probability of discovering appropriate vaccine candidates with fewer experiments and higher reliability.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cysteine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Drug Design , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Benzamides , Benzazepines , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/immunology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/drug effects , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/drug effects , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/immunology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Spiro Compounds/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/immunology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
5.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 18149, 2020 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387454

ABSTRACT

Antigens displayed on self-assembling nanoparticles can stimulate strong immune responses and have been playing an increasingly prominent role in structure-based vaccines. However, the development of such immunogens is often complicated by inefficiencies in their production. To alleviate this issue, we developed a plug-and-play platform using the spontaneous isopeptide-bond formation of the SpyTag:SpyCatcher system to display trimeric antigens on self-assembling nanoparticles, including the 60-subunit Aquifex aeolicus lumazine synthase (LuS) and the 24-subunit Helicobacter pylori ferritin. LuS and ferritin coupled to SpyTag expressed well in a mammalian expression system when an N-linked glycan was added to the nanoparticle surface. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion (F) glycoprotein trimer-stabilized in the prefusion conformation and fused with SpyCatcher-could be efficiently conjugated to LuS-SpyTag or ferritin-SpyTag, enabling multivalent display of F trimers with prefusion antigenicity. Similarly, F-glycoprotein trimers from human parainfluenza virus-type 3 and spike-glycoprotein trimers from SARS-CoV-2 could be displayed on LuS nanoparticles with decent yield and antigenicity. Notably, murine vaccination with 0.08 µg of SARS-CoV-2 spike-LuS nanoparticle elicited similar neutralizing responses as 2.0 µg of spike, which was ~ 25-fold higher on a weight-per-weight basis. The versatile platform described here thus allows for multivalent plug-and-play presentation on self-assembling nanoparticles of trimeric viral antigens, with SARS-CoV-2 spike-LuS nanoparticles inducing particularly potent neutralizing responses.


Subject(s)
Antigens/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antigens/genetics , Antigens/metabolism , Aquifex , Bacteria/enzymology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Ferritins/genetics , Helicobacter pylori/metabolism , Humans , Mice , Multienzyme Complexes/genetics , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Protein Multimerization , Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Surface Properties
6.
Nature ; 583(7818): 834-838, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387423

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel coronavirus with high nucleotide identity to SARS-CoV and to SARS-related coronaviruses that have been detected in horseshoe bats, has spread across the world and had a global effect on healthcare systems and economies1,2. A suitable small animal model is needed to support the development of vaccines and therapies. Here we report the pathogenesis and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in golden (Syrian) hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated the presence of viral antigens in nasal mucosa, bronchial epithelial cells and areas of lung consolidation on days 2 and 5 after inoculation with SARS-CoV-2, followed by rapid viral clearance and pneumocyte hyperplasia at 7 days after inoculation. We also found viral antigens in epithelial cells of the duodenum, and detected viral RNA in faeces. Notably, SARS-CoV-2 was transmitted efficiently from inoculated hamsters to naive hamsters by direct contact and via aerosols. Transmission via fomites in soiled cages was not as efficient. Although viral RNA was continuously detected in the nasal washes of inoculated hamsters for 14 days, the communicable period was short and correlated with the detection of infectious virus but not viral RNA. Inoculated and naturally infected hamsters showed apparent weight loss on days 6-7 post-inoculation or post-contact; all hamsters returned to their original weight within 14 days and developed neutralizing antibodies. Our results suggest that features associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in golden hamsters resemble those found in humans with mild SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mesocricetus/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Aerosols , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/isolation & purification , Antigens, Viral/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Bronchi/pathology , Bronchi/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Duodenum/virology , Fomites/virology , Housing, Animal , Kidney/virology , Male , Mesocricetus/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load , Weight Loss
7.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5874, 2020 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387320

ABSTRACT

Non-structural proteins (nsp) constitute the SARS-CoV-2 replication and transcription complex (RTC) to play a pivotal role in the virus life cycle. Here we determine the atomic structure of a SARS-CoV-2 mini RTC, assembled by viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, nsp12) with a template-primer RNA, nsp7 and nsp8, and two helicase molecules (nsp13-1 and nsp13-2), by cryo-electron microscopy. Two groups of mini RTCs with different conformations of nsp13-1 are identified. In both of them, nsp13-1 stabilizes overall architecture of the mini RTC by contacting with nsp13-2, which anchors the 5'-extension of RNA template, as well as interacting with nsp7-nsp8-nsp12-RNA. Orientation shifts of nsp13-1 results in its variable interactions with other components in two forms of mini RTC. The mutations on nsp13-1:nsp12 and nsp13-1:nsp13-2 interfaces prohibit the enhancement of helicase activity achieved by mini RTCs. These results provide an insight into how helicase couples with polymerase to facilitate its function in virus replication and transcription.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Virus Replication , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/genetics , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Structure-Activity Relationship , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
8.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 220, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387194
10.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256482, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effects of pre-existing endemic human coronavirus (HCoV) immunity on SARS-CoV-2 serologic and clinical responses are incompletely understood. OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine the effects of prior exposure to HCoV Betacoronavirus HKU1 spike protein on serologic responses to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein after intramuscular administration in mice. We also sought to understand the baseline seroprevalence of HKU1 spike antibodies in healthy children and to measure their correlation with SARS-CoV-2 binding and neutralizing antibodies in children hospitalized with acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) or multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). METHODS: Groups of 5 mice were injected intramuscularly with two doses of alum-adjuvanted HKU1 spike followed by SARS-CoV-2 spike; or the reciprocal regimen of SARS-Cov-2 spike followed by HKU1 spike. Sera collected 21 days following each injection was analyzed for IgG antibodies to HKU1 spike, SARS-CoV-2 spike, and SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. Sera from children hospitalized with acute COVID-19, MIS-C or healthy controls (n = 14 per group) were analyzed for these same antibodies. RESULTS: Mice primed with SARS-CoV-2 spike and boosted with HKU1 spike developed high titers of SARS-CoV-2 binding and neutralizing antibodies; however, mice primed with HKU1 spike and boosted with SARS-CoV-2 spike were unable to mount neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. HKU1 spike antibodies were detected in all children with acute COVID-19, MIS-C, and healthy controls. Although children with MIS-C had significantly higher HKU1 spike titers than healthy children (GMT 37239 vs. 7551, P = 0.012), these titers correlated positively with both SARS-CoV-2 binding (r = 0.7577, P<0.001) and neutralizing (r = 0.6201, P = 0.001) antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Prior murine exposure to HKU1 spike protein completely impeded the development of neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, consistent with original antigenic sin. In contrast, the presence of HKU1 spike IgG antibodies in children with acute COVID-19 or MIS-C was not associated with diminished neutralizing antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adolescent , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigen-Antibody Reactions , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
11.
Biophys Chem ; 265: 106441, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343142

ABSTRACT

The possibility of immobilizing a protein with antigenic properties on a solid support offers significant possibilities in the development of immunosensors and vaccine formulations. For both applications, the orientation of the antigen should ensure ready accessibility of the antibodies to the epitope. However, an experimental assessment of the orientational preferences necessarily proceeds through the preparation/isolation of the antigen, the immobilization on different surfaces and one or more biophysical characterization steps. To predict a priori whether favorable orientations can be achieved or not would allow one to select the most promising experimental routes, partly mitigating the time cost towards the final product. In this manuscript, we apply a simple computational model, based on united-residue modelling, to the prediction of the orientation of the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on surfaces commonly used in lateral-flow devices. These calculations can account for the experimental observation that direct immobilization on gold gives sufficient exposure of the epitope to obtain a response in immunochemical assays.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Epitopes/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antigens/chemistry , Antigens/immunology , Antigens/metabolism , Epitopes/immunology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2 , Silicon Dioxide/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Surface Properties
12.
Chin J Integr Med ; 26(7): 527-532, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343028

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To seek potential Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) through the molecular docking of the medicine with SARS-CoV-2 3CL hydrolytic enzyme and the angiotensin converting enzyme II(ACE2) as receptors, using computer virtual screening technique, so as to provide a basis for combination forecasting. METHODS: The molecular docking of CHM with the SARS-Cov-2 3CL hydrolase and the ACE2 converting enzyme, which were taken as the targets, was achieved by the Autodock Vina software. The CHM monomers acting on 3CLpro and ACE2 receptors were retrieved from the Traditional Chinese Medicine Systems Pharmacology Database and Analysis Platform, the active ingredients were selected, and the key CHMs and compounds were speculated. Based on the perspective of network pharmacology, the chemical-target network was constructed, and the functional enrichment analysis of gene ontology and the pathway enrichment analysis of Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes were carried out by DAVID to speculate about the mechanism of action of the core drug pairs. RESULTS: There are 6 small molecule compounds that have the optimal binding energy with the two target proteins. Among 238 potential anti-COVID-19 herbs screened in total, 16 kinds of CHM containing the most active ingredients, and 5 candidate anti-COVID-19 herbs that had been used in high frequency, as well as a core drug pair, namely, Forsythiae Fructus-Lonicerae Japonicae Flos were selected. CONCLUSION: The core drug pair of Forsythiae Fructus-Lonicerae Japonicae Flos containing multiple components and targets is easy to combine with 3CLpro and ACE2, and exerts an anti-COVID-19 pneumonia effect through multi-component and multi-target, and plays the role of anti-COVID-19 pneumonia in multi-pathway.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Gene Ontology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thermodynamics
14.
Biol Open ; 9(10)2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255997

ABSTRACT

SARS-like coronavirus (SARS-CoV2) has emerged as a global threat to humankind and is rapidly spreading. The infectivity, pathogenesis and infection of this virus are dependent on the interaction of SARS-CoV2 spike protein with human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (hACE2). Spike protein contains a receptor-binding domain (RBD) that recognizes hACE-2. In the present study, we are reporting a de novo designed novel hybrid antiviral 'VTAR-01' molecule that binds at the interface of RBD-hACE2 interaction. A series of antiviral molecules were tested for binding at the interface of RBD-hACE2 interaction. In silico screening, molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) analysis suggest ribavirin, ascorbate, lopinavir and hydroxychloroquine have strong interaction at the RBD-hACE2 interface. These four molecules were used for de novo fragment-based antiviral design. De novo designing, docking and MDS analysis identified a 'VTAR' hybrid molecule that has better interaction with this interface than all of the antivirals used to design it. We have further used retrosynthetic analysis and combinatorial synthesis to design 100 variants of VTAR molecules. Retrosynthetic analysis and combinatorial synthesis, along with docking and MDS, identified that VTAR-01 interacts with the interface of the RBD-ACE2 complex. MDS analysis confirmed its interaction with the RBD-ACE2 interface by involving Glu35 and Lys353 of ACE2, as well as Gln493 and Ser494 of RBD. Interaction of spike protein with ACE2 is essential for pathogenesis and infection of this virus; hence, this i n s ilico designed hybrid antiviral molecule (VTAR-01) that binds at the interface of RBD-hACE2 may be further developed to control the infection of SARS-CoV2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Combinatorial Chemistry Techniques , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cell Death/drug effects , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2 , Thermodynamics
15.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 529(2): 251-256, 2020 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220683

ABSTRACT

The nucleocapsid protein is significant in the formation of viral RNA of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), accounting for the largest proportion of viral structural proteins. Here, we report for the first time that the 11S proteasomal activator PA28γ regulates the intracellular abundance of the SARS-CoV-2 N protein (nCoV N). Furthermore, we have identified proteasome activator PA28γ as a nCoV N binding protein by co-immunoprecipitation assay. As a result of their interaction, nCoV N could be degraded by PA28γ-20S in vitro degradation assay. This was also demonstrated by blocking de novo protein synthesis with cycloheximide. The stability of nCoV N in PA28γ-knockout cells was greater than in PA28γ-wildtype cells. Notably, immunofluorescence staining revealed that knockout of the PA28γ gene in cells led to the transport of nCoV N from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of PA28γ enhanced proteolysis of nCoV N compared to that in PA28γ-N151Y cells containing a dominant-negative PA28γ mutation, which reduced this process. These results suggest that PA28γ binding is important in regulating 20S proteasome activity, which in turn regulates levels of the critical nCoV N nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2, furthering our understanding of the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Autoantigens/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , Proteolysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins , HEK293 Cells , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , Protein Stability , Protein Transport , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Life Sci ; 257: 118080, 2020 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152544

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic raised by SARS-CoV-2 is a public health emergency. However, lack of antiviral drugs and vaccine against human coronaviruses demands a concerted approach to challenge the SARS-CoV-2 infection. Under limited resource and urgency, combinatorial computational approaches to identify the potential inhibitor from known drugs could be applied against risen COVID-19 pandemic. Thereof, this study attempted to purpose the potent inhibitors from the approved drug pool against SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro). To circumvent the issue of lead compound from available drugs as antivirals, antibiotics with broad spectrum of viral activity, i.e. doxycycline, tetracycline, demeclocycline, and minocycline were chosen for molecular simulation analysis against native ligand N3 inhibitor in SARS-CoV-2 Mpro crystal structure. Molecular docking simulation predicted the docking score >-7 kcal/mol with significant intermolecular interaction at the catalytic dyad (His41 and Cys145) and other essential substrate binding residues of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. The best ligand conformations were further studied for complex stability and intermolecular interaction profiling with respect to time under 100 ns classical molecular dynamics simulation, established the significant stability and interactions of selected antibiotics by comparison to N3 inhibitor. Based on combinatorial molecular simulation analysis, doxycycline and minocycline were selected as potent inhibitor against SARS-CoV-2 Mpro which can used in combinational therapy against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Tetracyclines/pharmacology , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Binding Sites/physiology , COVID-19 , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Databases, Genetic , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation/methods , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Pandemics , Peptide Hydrolases/drug effects , Peptide Hydrolases/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Protease Inhibitors , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
17.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138305

ABSTRACT

The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor is a major severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) host range determinant, and understanding SARS-CoV-2-ACE2 interactions will provide important insights into COVID-19 pathogenesis and animal model development. SARS-CoV-2 cannot infect mice due to incompatibility between its receptor binding domain and the murine ACE2 receptor. Through molecular modeling and empirical in vitro validation, we identified 5 key amino acid differences between murine and human ACE2 that mediate SARS-CoV-2 infection, generating a chimeric humanized murine ACE2. Additionally, we examined the ability of the humanized murine ACE2 receptor to permit infection by an additional preemergent group 2B coronavirus, WIV-1, providing evidence for the potential pan-virus capabilities of this chimeric receptor. Finally, we predicted the ability of these determinants to inform host range identification of preemergent coronaviruses by evaluating hot spot contacts between SARS-CoV-2 and additional potential host receptors. Our results identify residue determinants that mediate coronavirus receptor usage and host range for application in SARS-CoV-2 and emerging coronavirus animal model development.IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 (the causative agent of COVID-19) is a major public health threat and one of two related coronaviruses that have caused epidemics in modern history. A method of screening potential infectible hosts for preemergent and future emergent coronaviruses would aid in mounting rapid response and intervention strategies during future emergence events. Here, we evaluated determinants of SARS-CoV-2 receptor interactions, identifying key changes that enable or prevent infection. The analysis detailed in this study will aid in the development of model systems to screen emergent coronaviruses as well as treatments to counteract infections.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Virus Replication , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host Specificity , Humans , Mice , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
18.
Viruses ; 12(6)2020 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120057

ABSTRACT

Although infection by SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of coronavirus pneumonia disease (COVID-19), is spreading rapidly worldwide, no drug has been shown to be sufficiently effective for treating COVID-19. We previously found that nafamostat mesylate, an existing drug used for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), effectively blocked Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) S protein-mediated cell fusion by targeting transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2), and inhibited MERS-CoV infection of human lung epithelium-derived Calu-3 cells. Here we established a quantitative fusion assay dependent on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) S protein, angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and TMPRSS2, and found that nafamostat mesylate potently inhibited the fusion while camostat mesylate was about 10-fold less active. Furthermore, nafamostat mesylate blocked SARS-CoV-2 infection of Calu-3 cells with an effective concentration (EC)50 around 10 nM, which is below its average blood concentration after intravenous administration through continuous infusion. On the other hand, a significantly higher dose (EC50 around 30 mM) was required for VeroE6/TMPRSS2 cells, where the TMPRSS2-independent but cathepsin-dependent endosomal infection pathway likely predominates. Together, our study shows that nafamostat mesylate potently inhibits SARS-CoV-2 S protein-mediated fusion in a cell fusion assay system and also inhibits SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro in a cell-type-dependent manner. These findings, together with accumulated clinical data regarding nafamostat's safety, make it a likely candidate drug to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Guanidines/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Benzamidines , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Esters , Gabexate/analogs & derivatives , Gabexate/pharmacology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells
19.
Endocr Res ; 45(3): 210-215, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050038

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Uptake of coronaviruses by target cells involves binding of the virus by cell ectoenzymes. For the etiologic agent of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), a receptor has been identified as angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). Recently it has been suggested that plasma membrane integrins may be involved in the internalization and replication of clinically important coronaviruses. For example, integrin αvß3 is involved in the cell uptake of a model porcine enteric α-coronavirus that causes human epidemics. ACE2 modulates the intracellular signaling generated by integrins. OBJECTIVE: We propose that the cellular internalization of αvß3 applies to uptake of coronaviruses bound to the integrin, and we evaluate the possibility that clinical host T4 may contribute to target cell uptake of coronavirus and to the consequence of cell uptake of the virus. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The viral binding domain of the integrin is near the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide-binding site and RGD molecules can affect virus binding. In this same locale on integrin αvß3 is the receptor for thyroid hormone analogues, particularly, L-thyroxine (T4). By binding to the integrin, T4 has been shown to modulate the affinity of the integrin for other proteins, to control internalization of αvß3 and to regulate the expression of a panel of cytokine genes, some of which are components of the 'cytokine storm' of viral infections. If T4 does influence coronavirus uptake by target cells, other thyroid hormone analogues, such as deaminated T4 and deaminated 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), are candidate agents to block the virus-relevant actions of T4 at integrin αvß3 and possibly restrict virus uptake.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Integrin alphaVbeta3/metabolism , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , Thyroid Hormones/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Cytokines/physiology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Oligopeptides/metabolism , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Swine , Thyroid Hormones/physiology , Thyroxine/physiology , Virus Internalization
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