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2.
Postepy Biochem ; 66(2): 83-90, 2020 05 09.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689005

ABSTRACT

In December 2019 in Wuhan, China the first cases of previously unknown, coronaviral infection-induced pneumonia have been reported. The new virus SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) was named after SARS-CoV due to their similarities and the disease caused by the pathogen is COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). On 11 March 2020 WHO (World Health Organization) defined the rapidly increasing number of incidents of COVID-19 as a pandemic. In this review we will present recent information about the SARS-CoV-2 focusing on the origin, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, structure, replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and potential pharmaceutical measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus
3.
J Med Virol ; 92(6): 584-588, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685102

ABSTRACT

Last December 2019, a new virus, named novel Coronavirus (COVID-2019) causing many cases of severe pneumonia was reported in Wuhan, China. The virus knowledge is limited and especially about COVID-2019 pathogenesis. The Open Reading Frame 1ab (ORF1ab) of COVID-2019 has been analyzed to evidence the presence of mutation caused by selective pressure on the virus. For selective pressure analysis fast-unconstrained Bayesian approximation (FUBAR) was used. Homology modelling has been performed by SwissModel and HHPred servers. The presence of transmembrane helical segments in Coronavirus ORF1ab non structural protein 2 (nsp2) and nsp3 was tested by TMHMM, MEMSAT, and MEMPACK tools. Three-dimensional structures have been analyzed and displayed using PyMOL. FUBAR analysis revealed the presence of potential sites under positive selective pressure (P < .05). Position 723 in the COVID-2019 has a serine instead a glycine residue, while at aminoacidic position 1010 a proline instead an isoleucine. Significant (P < .05) pervasive negative selection in 2416 sites (55%) was found. The positive selective pressure could account for some clinical features of this virus compared with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Bat SARS-like CoV. The stabilizing mutation falling in the endosome-associated-protein-like domain of the nsp2 protein could account for COVID-2019 high ability of contagious, while the destabilizing mutation in nsp3 proteins could suggest a potential mechanism differentiating COVID-2019 from SARS. These data could be helpful for further investigation aimed to identify potential therapeutic targets or vaccine strategy, especially in the actual moment when the epidemic is ongoing and the scientific community is trying to enrich knowledge about this new viral pathogen.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , SARS Virus/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Gene Expression , Humans , Male , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , Selection, Genetic , Structural Homology, Protein , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 549, 2020 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to report the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in Zengdu District, Hubei Province, China. METHODS: Clinical data on COVID-19 inpatients in Zengdu Hospital from January 27 to March 11, 2020 were collected; this is a community hospital in an area surrounding Wuhan and supported by volunteer doctors. All hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were included in this study. The epidemiological findings, clinical features, laboratory findings, radiologic manifestations, and clinical outcomes of these patients were analyzed. The patients were followed up for clinical outcomes until March 22, 2020. Severe COVID-19 cases include severe and critical cases diagnosed according to the seventh edition of China's COVID-19 diagnostic guidelines. Severe and critical COVID-19 cases were diagnosed according to the seventh edition of China's COVID-19 diagnostic guidelines. RESULTS: All hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 276 (median age: 51.0 years), were enrolled, including 262 non-severe and 14 severe patients. The proportion of patients aged over 60 years was higher in the severe group (78.6%) than in the non-severe group (18.7%, p < 0.01). Approximately a quarter of the patients (24.6%) had at least one comorbidity, such as hypertension, diabetes, or cancer, and the proportion of patients with comorbidities was higher in the severe group (85.7%) than in the non-severe group (21.4%, p < 0.01). Common symptoms included fever (82.2% [227/276]) and cough (78.0% [218/276]). 38.4% (106/276) of the patients had a fever at the time of admission. Most patients (94.9% [204/276]) were cured and discharged; 3.6% (10/276) deteriorated to a critical condition and were transferred to another hospital. The median COVID-19 treatment duration and hospital stay were 14.0 and 18.0 days, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the COVID-19 patients in Zengdu had mild disease. Older patients with underlying diseases were at a higher risk of progression to severe disease. The length of hospital-stay and antiviral treatment duration for COVID-19 were slightly longer than those in Wuhan. This work will contribute toward an understanding of COVID-19 characteristics in the areas around the core COVID-19 outbreak region and serve as a reference for decision-making for epidemic prevention and control in similar areas.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cough/epidemiology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
7.
Washington; Organización Panamericana de la Salud; jul. 21, 2020. 5 p.
Non-conventional in Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-677295

ABSTRACT

El SARS-CoV-2 es un agente patógeno que causa la enfermedad por COVID-19, la cual fue notificada por primera vez en diciembre de 2019. Se cree que el SARS-CoV-2 fue originado de una fuente animal y posteriormente diseminado a la población humana. A pesar de que se han aislado virus genéticamente relacionados en murciélagos Rhinolophus, no se ha establecido el origen exacto de SARS-CoV-2 y la ruta de introducción de este virus a la población humana sigue siendo objeto de investigación.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Epidemiological Monitoring/veterinary , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity
8.
Int J Mol Med ; 46(2): 467-488, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-678269

ABSTRACT

The major impact produced by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) focused many researchers attention to find treatments that can suppress transmission or ameliorate the disease. Despite the very fast and large flow of scientific data on possible treatment solutions, none have yet demonstrated unequivocal clinical utility against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19). This work represents an exhaustive and critical review of all available data on potential treatments for COVID­19, highlighting their mechanistic characteristics and the strategy development rationale. Drug repurposing, also known as drug repositioning, and target based methods are the most used strategies to advance therapeutic solutions into clinical practice. Current in silico, in vitro and in vivo evidence regarding proposed treatments are summarized providing strong support for future research efforts.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/classification , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Bromhexine/pharmacology , Bromhexine/therapeutic use , Chlorpromazine/pharmacology , Chlorpromazine/therapeutic use , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diminazene/pharmacology , Diminazene/therapeutic use , Drug Repositioning/methods , Drug Repositioning/standards , Drug Repositioning/trends , Gabexate/analogs & derivatives , Gabexate/pharmacology , Gabexate/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , Signal Transduction/drug effects
9.
Postepy Biochem ; 66(2): 83-90, 2020 05 09.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671307

ABSTRACT

In December 2019 in Wuhan, China the first cases of previously unknown, coronaviral infection-induced pneumonia have been reported. The new virus SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) was named after SARS-CoV due to their similarities and the disease caused by the pathogen is COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). On 11 March 2020 WHO (World Health Organization) defined the rapidly increasing number of incidents of COVID-19 as a pandemic. In this review we will present recent information about the SARS-CoV-2 focusing on the origin, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, structure, replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and potential pharmaceutical measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus
10.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 102(6): 1178-1180, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-668710

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic highlights the experience of communities in the global South that have grappled with vulnerability and scarcity for decades. In the global North, many frontline workers are now being similarly forced to provide and ration care in unprecedented ways, with minimal guidance. We outline six reflections gained as Western practitioners working in resource-denied settings which inform our current experience with COVID-19. The reflections include the following: managing trauma, remaining flexible in dynamic situations, and embracing discomfort to think bigger about context-specific solutions to collectively build back our systems. Through this contextualized reflection on resilience, we hope to motivate strength and solidarity for providers, patients, and health systems, while proposing critical questions for our response moving forward.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing/ethics , Health Services Accessibility/economics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health/economics , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Care Rationing/economics , Healthcare Disparities/ethics , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , North America/epidemiology , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Public Health/ethics , Uncertainty
11.
Int J Oncol ; 57(2): 533-539, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-667782

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus­2 (SARS­CoV2) is the cause of a new disease (COVID­19) which has evolved into a pandemic during the first half of 2020. Older age, male sex and certain underlying diseases, including cancer, appear to significantly increase the risk for severe COVID­19. SARS­CoV­2 infection of host cells is facilitated by the angiotensin­converting enzyme 2 (ACE­2), and by transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and other host cell proteases such as cathepsin L (CTSL). With the exception of ACE­2, a systematic analysis of these two other SARS­CoV2 infection mediators in malignancies is lacking. Here, we analysed genetic alteration, RNA expression, and DNA methylation of TMPRSS2 and CTSL across a wide spectrum of tumors and controls. TMPRSS2 was overexpressed in cervical squamous cell carcinoma and endocervical adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, prostate adenocarcinoma (PRAD), rectum adenocarcinoma (READ), uterine corpus endometrial carcinoma and uterine carcinosarcoma, with PRAD and READ exhibiting the highest expression of all cancers. CTSL was upregulated in lymphoid neoplasm diffuse large B­cell lymphoma, oesophageal carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lower grade glioma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, skin cutaneous melanoma, stomach adenocarcinoma, and thymoma. Hypo­methylation of both genes was evident in most cases where they have been highly upregulated. We have expanded on our observations by including data relating to mutations and copy number alterations at pan­cancer level. The novel hypotheses that are stemming out of these data need to be further investigated and validated in large clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Cathepsin L/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Neoplasms/genetics , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , DNA Methylation , Databases, Genetic , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Male , Neoplasms/enzymology , Neoplasms/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/enzymology , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Risk Factors
12.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(8): 104953, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665503

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although there is evidence to suggest a high rate of cerebrovascular complications in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, anecdotal reports indicate a falling rate of new ischemic stroke diagnoses. We conducted an exploratory single-center analysis to estimate the change in number of new stroke diagnoses in our region, and evaluate the proximate reasons for this change during the COVID-19 pandemic at a tertiary care center in New Jersey. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Comprehensive Stroke Center prospective cohort was retrospectively analyzed for the number of stroke admissions, demographic features, and short-term outcomes 5 months prior to 3/1/2020 (pre-COVID-19), and in the 6 weeks that followed (COVID-19 period). The primary outcome was the number of new acute stroke diagnoses before and during the COVID-19 period, as well as the potential reasons for a decline in the number of new diagnoses. RESULTS: Of the 328 included patients, 53 (16%) presented in the COVID-19 period. There was a mean fall of 38% in new stroke diagnoses (mean 1.13/day [SD 1.07] from 1.82/day [SD 1.38], p<0.01), which was related to a 59% decline in the number of daily transfers from referral centers (p<0.01), 25% fewer telestroke consultations (p=0.08), and 55% fewer patients presenting directly to our institution by private vehicle (p<0.01) and 29% fewer patients through emergency services (p=0.09). There was no significant change in the monthly number of strokes due to large vessel occlusion (LVO), however the proportion of new LVOs nearly doubled in the COVID-19 period (38% vs. 21%, p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The observations at our tertiary care center corroborate anecdotal reports that the number of new stroke diagnoses is falling, which seems related to a smaller proportion of patients seeking healthcare services for milder symptoms. These preliminary data warrant validation in larger, multi-center studies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , New Jersey/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Transfer , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Remote Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , Stroke/virology , Time Factors
13.
Anesth Analg ; 131(2): 351-364, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665311

ABSTRACT

Health care systems are belligerently responding to the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a specific condition, whose distinctive features are severe hypoxemia associated with (>50% of cases) normal respiratory system compliance. When a patient requires intubation and invasive ventilation, the outcome is poor, and the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) is usually 2 or 3 weeks. In this article, the authors review several technological devices, which could support health care providers at the bedside to optimize the care for COVID-19 patients who are sedated, paralyzed, and ventilated. Particular attention is provided to the use of videolaryngoscopes (VL) because these can assist anesthetists to perform a successful intubation outside the ICU while protecting health care providers from this viral infection. Authors will also review processed electroencephalographic (EEG) monitors which are used to better titrate sedation and the train-of-four monitors which are utilized to better administer neuromuscular blocking agents in the view of sparing limited pharmacological resources. COVID-19 can rapidly exhaust human and technological resources too within the ICU. This review features a series of technological advancements that can significantly improve the care of patients requiring isolation. The working conditions in isolation could cause gaps or barriers in communication, fatigue, and poor documentation of provided care. The available technology has several advantages including (a) facilitating appropriate paperless documentation and communication between all health care givers working in isolation rooms or large isolation areas; (b) testing patients and staff at the bedside using smart point-of-care diagnostics (SPOCD) to confirm COVID-19 infection; (c) allowing diagnostics and treatment at the bedside through point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) and thromboelastography (TEG); (d) adapting the use of anesthetic machines and the use of volatile anesthetics. Implementing technologies for safeguarding health care providers as well as monitoring the limited pharmacological resources are paramount. Only by leveraging new technologies, it will be possible to sustain and support health care systems during the expected long course of this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Health Resources/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Health Services Needs and Demand/organization & administration , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Needs Assessment/organization & administration , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Point-of-Care Systems/organization & administration , Point-of-Care Testing/organization & administration , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
15.
Rev Int Androl ; 18(3): 117-123, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664119

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this revision is to summarize the current existing evidence of the potential adverse effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the male reproductive system and provide the recommendations of the Asociación Española de Andrología, Medicina Sexual y Reproductiva (ASESA) concerning the implications of COVID-19 infection in the management of male infertilty patients and testicular endocrine dysfunction. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic literature search of the databases of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Medline, Cochrane and MedRxiv, was carried out. RESULTS: The presence of orchitis as a potential complication of the infection by SARS-CoV-2 has not yet been confirmed. One study reported that 19% of males with COVID-19 infection had scrotal symptoms suggestive of viral orchitis which could not be confirmed. It is possible that the virus, rather than infecting the testes directly, may induce a secondary autoimmune response leading to autoimmune orchitis. COVID-19 has been associated with coagulation disorders and thus the orchitis could be the result of segmental vasculitis. Existing data concerning the presence of the virus in semen are contradictory. Only one study reported the presence of RNA in 15.8% of patients with COVID-19. However, the presence of nucleic acid or antigen in semen is not synonyms of viral replication capacity and infectivity. It has been reported an increase in serum levels of LH in males with COVID-19 and a significant reduction in the T/LH and FSH/LH ratios, consistent with subclinical hypogonadism. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of recent reports related to the potential effects of COVID-19 infection on the male reproductive system are based on poorly designed, small sample size studies that provide inconclusive, contradictory results. Since there still exists a theoretical possibility of testicular damage and male infertilty as a result of the infection by COVID-19, males of reproductive age should be evaluated for gonadal function and semen analysis. With regard to the sexual transmission of the virus, there is not sufficient evidence to recommend asymptomatic couples to abstein from having sex in order to protect themselves from being infected by the virus. Additional studies are needed to understand the long-term effects of SARS-CoV-2 on male reproductive function, including male fertility potential and endocrine testicular function.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Reproductive Health , Sexual Health , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Follicle Stimulating Hormone/blood , Humans , Hypogonadism/blood , Hypogonadism/etiology , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Leukocytes , Luteinizing Hormone/blood , Male , Orchitis/etiology , Orchitis/virology , Prostate/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Semen/virology , Semen Preservation , Spain , Testis/immunology , Testis/pathology , Testis/virology , Testosterone/blood , Vasculitis/etiology , Young Adult
17.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 19(1): 115, 2020 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662457

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been declared as pandemic by the World Health Organization and is causing substantial morbidity and mortality all over the world. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease significantly increase the risk for hospitalization and death in COVID-19 patients. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are both predictors for adverse outcomes in hospitalized patients. An optimized glycemic control should be pursued in patients with diabetes and SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the risk of severe COVID-19 course. Both insulin and GLP-1RAs have shown optimal glucose-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects in type 2 diabetic patients and may represent a valid therapeutic option to treat asymptomatic and non-critically ill COVID-19 diabetic patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Glucose/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/administration & dosage , Incretins/administration & dosage , Insulin/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor/agonists , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Incretins/adverse effects , Insulin/adverse effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
18.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(2): 447-451, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661781

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitates aggressive infection mitigation strategies to reduce the risk to patients and healthcare providers. This document is intended to provide a framework for the adult cardiac surgeon to consider in this rapidly changing environment. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative detailed protective measures are outlined. These are guidance recommendations during a pandemic surge to be used for all patients while local COVID-19 disease burden remains elevated.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Heart Diseases/surgery , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Recovery Room/standards , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Cross Infection/virology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Health/standards , Patient Safety/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Virulence
20.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 26: 1076029620936776, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657787

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has proven to be particularly challenging given the complex pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2. Early data have demonstrated how the host response to this novel coronavirus leads to the proliferation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, massive endothelial damage, and generalized vascular manifestations. While SARS-CoV-2 primarily targets the upper and lower respiratory tract, other organ systems are also affected. SARS-CoV-2 relies on 2 host cell receptors for successful attachment: angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and transmembrane protease serine 2. Clinicopathologic reports have demonstrated associations between severe COVID-19 and viral coagulopathy, resulting in pulmonary embolism; venous, arterial, and microvascular thrombosis; lung endothelial injury; and associated thrombotic complications leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Viral coagulopathy is not novel given similar observations with SARS classic, including the consumption of platelets, generation of thrombin, and increased fibrin degradation product exhibiting overt disseminated intravascular coagulation-like syndrome. The specific mechanism(s) behind the thrombotic complications in COVID-19 patients has yet to be fully understood. Parenteral anticoagulants, such as heparin and low-molecular-weights heparins, are widely used in the management of COVID-19 patients. Beyond the primary (anticoagulant) effects of these agents, they may exhibit antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective effects. Direct oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents are also useful in the management of these patients. Tissue plasminogen activator and other fibrinolytic modalities may also be helpful in the overall management. Catheter-directed thrombolysis can be used in patients developing pulmonary embolism. Further investigations are required to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of COVID-19-associated thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombophilia/etiology , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/pharmacology , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/etiology , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/physiopathology , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Catheterization, Swan-Ganz , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Thrombolytic Therapy/instrumentation , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Thrombophilia/physiopathology , Thrombophilia/therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/physiopathology , Venous Thrombosis/virology , Virus Internalization/drug effects
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