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1.
Commun Biol ; 5(1): 483, 2022 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852521

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) ORF6 is an antagonist of interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral signaling, achieved through the prevention of STAT1 nuclear localization. However, the exact mechanism through which ORF6 prevents STAT1 nuclear trafficking remains unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that ORF6 directly binds to STAT1 with or without IFN stimulation, resulting in the nuclear exclusion of STAT1. ORF6 also recognizes importin α subtypes with different modes, in particular, high affinity to importin α1 but a low affinity to importin α5. Although ORF6 potentially disrupts the importin α/importin ß1-mediated nuclear transport, thereby suppressing the nuclear translocation of the other classical nuclear localization signal-containing cargo proteins, the inhibitory effect of ORF6 is modest when compared with that of STAT1. The results indicate that the drastic nuclear exclusion of STAT1 is attributed to the specific binding with ORF6, which is a distinct strategy for the importin α1-mediated pathway. Combined with the results from a newly-produced replicon system and a hamster model, we conclude that SARS-CoV-2 ORF6 acts as a virulence factor via regulation of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to accelerate viral replication, resulting in disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents , Biological Transport , Cricetinae , Viral Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication , alpha Karyopherins/genetics , alpha Karyopherins/metabolism
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(4)2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715400

ABSTRACT

Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), discovered in 2004, are thin, long protrusions between cells utilized for intercellular transfer and communication. These newly discovered structures have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in homeostasis, but also in the spreading of diseases, infections, and metastases. Gaining much interest in the medical research field, TNTs have been shown to transport nanomedicines (NMeds) between cells. NMeds have been studied thanks to their advantageous features in terms of reduced toxicity of drugs, enhanced solubility, protection of the payload, prolonged release, and more interestingly, cell-targeted delivery. Nevertheless, their transfer between cells via TNTs makes their true fate unknown. If better understood, TNTs could help control NMed delivery. In fact, TNTs can represent the possibility both to improve the biodistribution of NMeds throughout a diseased tissue by increasing their formation, or to minimize their formation to block the transfer of dangerous material. To date, few studies have investigated the interaction between NMeds and TNTs. In this work, we will explain what TNTs are and how they form and then review what has been published regarding their potential use in nanomedicine research. We will highlight possible future approaches to better exploit TNT intercellular communication in the field of nanomedicine.


Subject(s)
Cell Membrane Structures/metabolism , Animals , Biological Transport/physiology , Humans , Nanomedicine/methods , Nanotubes , Tissue Distribution/physiology
3.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(12): 1240-1254, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699219

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles and exomere nanoparticles are under intense investigation as sources of clinically relevant cargo. Here we report the discovery of a distinct extracellular nanoparticle, termed supermere. Supermeres are morphologically distinct from exomeres and display a markedly greater uptake in vivo compared with small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. The protein and RNA composition of supermeres differs from small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Supermeres are highly enriched with cargo involved in multiple cancers (glycolytic enzymes, TGFBI, miR-1246, MET, GPC1 and AGO2), Alzheimer's disease (APP) and cardiovascular disease (ACE2, ACE and PCSK9). The majority of extracellular RNA is associated with supermeres rather than small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Cancer-derived supermeres increase lactate secretion, transfer cetuximab resistance and decrease hepatic lipids and glycogen in vivo. This study identifies a distinct functional nanoparticle replete with potential circulating biomarkers and therapeutic targets for a host of human diseases.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nanoparticles/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biological Transport/physiology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Cell Communication/physiology , Cell Line, Tumor , HeLa Cells , Humans , Lactic Acid/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Nanoparticles/classification , Neoplasms/pathology , Tumor Microenvironment
4.
Biomolecules ; 12(2)2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677658

ABSTRACT

Amino acid transporters are expressed in mammalian cells not only in the plasma membrane but also in intracellular membranes. The conventional function of these transporters is to transfer their amino acid substrates across the lipid bilayer; the direction of the transfer is dictated by the combined gradients for the amino acid substrates and the co-transported ions (Na+, H+, K+ or Cl-) across the membrane. In cases of electrogenic transporters, the membrane potential also contributes to the direction of the amino acid transfer. In addition to this expected traditional function, several unconventional functions are known for some of these amino acid transporters. This includes their role in intracellular signaling, regulation of acid-base balance, and entry of viruses into cells. Such functions expand the biological roles of these transporters beyond the logical amino acid homeostasis. In recent years, two additional unconventional biochemical/metabolic processes regulated by certain amino acid transporters have come to be recognized: macropinocytosis and obesity. This adds to the repertoire of biological processes that are controlled and regulated by amino acid transporters in health and disease. In the present review, we highlight the unusual involvement of selective amino acid transporters in macropinocytosis (SLC38A5/SLC38A3) and diet-induced obesity/metabolic syndrome (SLC6A19/SLC6A14/SLC6A6).


Subject(s)
Metabolic Syndrome , Amino Acid Transport Systems/metabolism , Animals , Biological Transport , Diet , Mammals/metabolism , Obesity/metabolism
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667194

ABSTRACT

The TMEM16A/anoctamin-1 calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) contributes to a range of vital functions, such as the control of vascular tone and epithelial ion transport. The channel is a founding member of a family of 10 proteins (TMEM16x) with varied functions; some members (i.e., TMEM16A and TMEM16B) serve as CaCCs, while others are lipid scramblases, combine channel and scramblase function, or perform additional cellular roles. TMEM16x proteins are typically activated by agonist-induced Ca2+ release evoked by Gq-protein-coupled receptor (GqPCR) activation; thus, TMEM16x proteins link Ca2+-signalling with cell electrical activity and/or lipid transport. Recent studies demonstrate that a range of other cellular factors-including plasmalemmal lipids, pH, hypoxia, ATP and auxiliary proteins-also control the activity of the TMEM16A channel and its paralogues, suggesting that the TMEM16x proteins are effectively polymodal sensors of cellular homeostasis. Here, we review the molecular pathophysiology, structural biology, and mechanisms of regulation of TMEM16x proteins by multiple cellular factors.


Subject(s)
Anoctamin-1/metabolism , Anoctamins/metabolism , Chloride Channels/metabolism , Animals , Anoctamins/physiology , Biological Transport/physiology , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Humans , Ion Transport/physiology , Phospholipid Transfer Proteins/metabolism
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4502, 2021 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550282

ABSTRACT

Cells in many tissues, such as bone, muscle, and placenta, fuse into syncytia to acquire new functions and transcriptional programs. While it is known that fused cells are specialized, it is unclear whether cell-fusion itself contributes to programmatic-changes that generate the new cellular state. Here, we address this by employing a fusogen-mediated, cell-fusion system to create syncytia from undifferentiated cells. RNA-Seq analysis reveals VSV-G-induced cell fusion precedes transcriptional changes. To gain mechanistic insights, we measure the plasma membrane surface area after cell-fusion and observe it diminishes through increases in endocytosis. Consequently, glucose transporters internalize, and cytoplasmic glucose and ATP transiently decrease. This reduced energetic state activates AMPK, which inhibits YAP1, causing transcriptional-reprogramming and cell-cycle arrest. Impairing either endocytosis or AMPK activity prevents YAP1 inhibition and cell-cycle arrest after fusion. Together, these data demonstrate plasma membrane diminishment upon cell-fusion causes transient nutrient stress that may promote transcriptional-reprogramming independent from extrinsic cues.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Nucleus/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Transcription Factors/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , AMP-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , AMP-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Animals , Biological Transport , Cell Fusion , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Cells, Cultured , Giant Cells/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Mice , RNA-Seq/methods , Signal Transduction/genetics , Transcription Factors/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics
7.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 86-97, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cultured cell lines are widely used for research in the physiology, pathophysiology, toxicology, and pharmacology of the renal proximal tubule. The lines that are most appropriate for a given use depend upon the genes expressed. New tools for transcriptomic profiling using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) make it possible to catalog expressed genes in each cell line. METHODS: Fourteen different proximal tubule cell lines, representing six species, were grown on permeable supports under conditions specific for the respective lines. RNA-Seq followed standard procedures. RESULTS: Transcripts expressed in cell lines variably matched transcripts selectively expressed in native proximal tubule. Opossum kidney (OK) cells displayed the highest percentage match (45% of proximal marker genes [TPM threshold =15]), with pig kidney cells (LLC-PK1) close behind (39%). Lower-percentage matches were seen for various human lines, including HK-2 (26%), and lines from rodent kidneys, such as NRK-52E (23%). Nominally, identical OK cells from different sources differed substantially in expression of proximal tubule markers. Mapping cell line transcriptomes to gene sets for various proximal tubule functions (sodium and water transport, protein transport, metabolic functions, endocrine functions) showed that different lines may be optimal for experimentally modeling each function. An online resource (https://esbl.nhlbi.nih.gov/JBrowse/KCT/) has been created to interrogate cell line transcriptome data. Proteomic analysis of NRK-52E cells confirmed low expression of many proximal tubule marker proteins. CONCLUSIONS: No cell line fully matched the transcriptome of native proximal tubule cells. However, some of the lines tested are suitable for the study of particular metabolic and transport processes seen in the proximal tubule.


Subject(s)
Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/metabolism , Transcriptome , Animals , Biological Transport , Cell Line , Chromatography, Liquid , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Internet , Mice , Opossums , Proteomics , RNA-Seq , Rats , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Species Specificity , Swine , Tandem Mass Spectrometry
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488607

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence suggests that males are more susceptible to severe infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus than females. A variety of mechanisms may underlie the observed gender-related disparities including differences in sex hormones. However, the precise mechanisms by which female sex hormones may provide protection against SARS-CoV-2 infectivity remains unknown. Here we report new insights into the molecular basis of the interactions between the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein and the human ACE2 receptor. We further report that glycosylation of the ACE2 receptor enhances SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. Importantly, estrogens can disrupt glycan-glycan interactions and glycan-protein interactions between the human ACE2 and the SARS-CoV-2 thereby blocking its entry into cells. In a mouse model of COVID-19, estrogens reduced ACE2 glycosylation and thereby alveolar uptake of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. These results shed light on a putative mechanism whereby female sex hormones may provide protection from developing severe infection and could inform the development of future therapies against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Estrogens/chemistry , Estrogens/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Biological Transport , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Estrogens/pharmacology , Glycosylation/drug effects , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Polysaccharides/chemistry , Polysaccharides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Tunicamycin/pharmacology
9.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438526

ABSTRACT

Eukaryotic cells contain dynamic membrane-bound organelles that are constantly remodeled in response to physiological and environmental cues. Key organelles are the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane, which are interconnected by vesicular traffic through the secretory transport route. Numerous viruses, especially enveloped viruses, use and modify compartments of the secretory pathway to promote their replication, assembly and cell egression by hijacking the host cell machinery. In some cases, the subversion mechanism has been uncovered. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how the secretory pathway is subverted and exploited by viruses belonging to Picornaviridae, Coronaviridae, Flaviviridae, Poxviridae, Parvoviridae and Herpesviridae families.


Subject(s)
Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , Golgi Apparatus/virology , Secretory Pathway/physiology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Biological Transport/physiology , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Membrane/virology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Golgi Apparatus/metabolism , Humans
10.
Placenta ; 115: 70-77, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433733

ABSTRACT

Species differences are among the main reasons for the high failure rate of preclinical studies. A better awareness and understanding of these differences might help to improve the outcome of preclinical research. In reproduction, the placenta is the central organ regulating fetal exposure to a substance circulating in the maternal organism. Exact information about placental transfer can help to better estimate the toxic potential of a substance. From an evolutionary point of view, the chorioallantoic placenta is the organ with the highest anatomical diversity among species. Moreover, frequently used animal models in reproduction belong to rodents and lagomorphs, two groups that are characterized by the generation of an additional type of placenta, which is crucial for fetal development, but absent from humans: the inverted yolk sac placenta. Taken together, the translatability of placental transfer studies from laboratory animals to humans is challenging, which is supported by the fact that numerous species-dependent toxic effects are described in literature. Thus, reliable human-relevant data are frequently lacking and the toxic potential of chemicals and pharmaceuticals for humans can hardly be estimated, often resulting in recommendations that medical treatments or exposure to chemicals should be avoided for safety reasons. Although species differences of placental anatomy have been described frequently and the need for human-relevant research models has been emphasized, analyses of substances with species-dependent placental transfer have been performed only sporadically. Here, we present examples for species-specific placental transfer, including that of nanoparticles and pharmaceuticals, and discuss potential underlying mechanisms. With respect to the COVID 19-pandemic it might be of interest that some antiviral drugs are reported to feature species-specific placental transfer. Further, differences in placental structure and antibody transfer may affect placental transfer of ZIKA virus.


Subject(s)
Maternal-Fetal Exchange/physiology , Placenta/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Biological Transport/physiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Maternal-Fetal Exchange/drug effects , Placenta/drug effects , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/metabolism , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Yolk Sac/metabolism , Yolk Sac/physiology , Zika Virus/metabolism , Zika Virus Infection/drug therapy , Zika Virus Infection/transmission
11.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376745

ABSTRACT

As viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites, any step during their life cycle strictly depends on successful interaction with their particular host cells. In particular, their interaction with cellular membranes is of crucial importance for most steps in the viral replication cycle. Such interactions are initiated by uptake of viral particles and subsequent trafficking to intracellular compartments to access their replication compartments which provide a spatially confined environment concentrating viral and cellular components, and subsequently, employ cellular membranes for assembly and exit of viral progeny. The ability of viruses to actively modulate lipid composition such as sphingolipids (SLs) is essential for successful completion of the viral life cycle. In addition to their structural and biophysical properties of cellular membranes, some sphingolipid (SL) species are bioactive and as such, take part in cellular signaling processes involved in regulating viral replication. It is especially due to the progress made in tools to study accumulation and dynamics of SLs, which visualize their compartmentalization and identify interaction partners at a cellular level, as well as the availability of genetic knockout systems, that the role of particular SL species in the viral replication process can be analyzed and, most importantly, be explored as targets for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Sphingolipids/metabolism , Virus Diseases , Biological Transport , Cell Membrane/chemistry , Ceramides/metabolism , Drug Delivery Systems , HIV/growth & development , Host Microbial Interactions , Intracellular Membranes/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Virion , Virus Replication , Viruses/growth & development
12.
Antiviral Res ; 194: 105167, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370440

ABSTRACT

Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) receptor is an endosomal membrane protein that regulates intracellular cholesterol traffic. This protein has been shown to play an important role for several viruses. It has been reported that SARS-CoV-2 enters the cell through plasma membrane fusion and/or endosomal entry upon availability of proteases. However, the whole process is not fully understood yet and additional viral/host factors might be required for viral fusion and subsequent viral replication. Here, we report a novel interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 nucleoprotein (N) and the cholesterol transporter NPC1. Furthermore, we have found that some compounds reported to interact with NPC1, carbazole SC816 and sulfides SC198 and SC073, were able to reduce SARS-CoV-2 viral infection with a good selectivity index in human cell infection models. These findings suggest the importance of NPC1 for SARS-CoV-2 viral infection and a new possible potential therapeutic target to fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Transport , COVID-19/drug therapy , Endosomes/virology , Niemann-Pick C1 Protein/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Carbazoles/pharmacology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endosomes/chemistry , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins , Membrane Fusion , Vero Cells , Virus Replication
13.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359299

ABSTRACT

Viral RNAs contain the information needed to synthesize their own proteins, to replicate, and to spread to susceptible cells. However, due to their reduced coding capacity RNA viruses rely on host cells to complete their multiplication cycle. This is largely achieved by the concerted action of regulatory structural elements on viral RNAs and a subset of host proteins, whose dedicated function across all stages of the infection steps is critical to complete the viral cycle. Importantly, not only the RNA sequence but also the RNA architecture imposed by the presence of specific structural domains mediates the interaction with host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), ultimately affecting virus multiplication and spreading. In marked difference with other biological systems, the genome of positive strand RNA viruses is also the mRNA. Here we focus on distinct types of positive strand RNA viruses that differ in the regulatory elements used to promote translation of the viral RNA, as well as in the mechanisms used to evade the series of events connected to antiviral response, including translation shutoff induced in infected cells, assembly of stress granules, and trafficking stress.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , RNA Viruses/physiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Response Elements , Biological Transport , Cytoplasmic Granules/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Humans , Protein Biosynthesis , RNA Virus Infections/metabolism , RNA Virus Infections/virology , RNA, Viral/chemistry , Stress, Physiological , Transport Vesicles/metabolism , Virus Replication
14.
SLAS Discov ; 26(6): 783-797, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293079

ABSTRACT

Classical high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies for the analysis of ionic currents across biological membranes can be performed using fluorescence-based, radioactive, and mass spectrometry (MS)-based uptake assays. These assays provide rapid results for pharmacological HTS, but the underlying, indirect analytical character of these assays can be linked to high false-positive hit rates. Thus, orthogonal and secondary assays using more biological target-based technologies are indispensable for further compound validation and optimization. Direct assay technologies for transporter proteins are electrophysiology-based, but are also complex, time-consuming, and not well applicable for automated profiling purposes. In contrast to conventional patch clamp systems, solid supported membrane (SSM)-based electrophysiology is a sensitive, membrane-based method for transporter analysis, and current technical developments target the demand for automated, accelerated, and sensitive assays for transporter-directed compound screening. In this study, the suitability of the SSM-based technique for pharmacological compound identification and optimization was evaluated performing cell-free SSM-based measurements with the electrogenic amino acid transporter B0AT1 (SLC6A19). Electrophysiological characterization of leucine-induced currents demonstrated that the observed signals were specific to B0AT1. Moreover, B0AT1-dependent responses were successfully inhibited using an established in-house tool compound. Evaluation of current stability and data reproducibility verified the robustness and reliability of the applied assay. Active compounds from primary screens of large compound libraries were validated, and false-positive hits were identified. These results clearly demonstrate the suitability of the SSM-based technique as a direct electrophysiological method for rapid and automated identification of small molecules that can inhibit B0AT1 activity.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/metabolism , Electrophysiological Phenomena , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/agonists , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Biological Assay/methods , Biological Transport/drug effects , CHO Cells , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cricetulus , Humans , Mice , Patch-Clamp Techniques/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology
15.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289022

ABSTRACT

Inhibition of the binding of enveloped viruses surface glycoproteins to host cell receptor(s) is a major target of vaccines and constitutes an efficient strategy to block viral entry and infection of various host cells and tissues. Cellular entry usually requires the fusion of the viral envelope with host plasma membranes. Such entry mechanism is often preceded by "priming" and/or "activation" steps requiring limited proteolysis of the viral surface glycoprotein to expose a fusogenic domain for efficient membrane juxtapositions. The 9-membered family of Proprotein Convertases related to Subtilisin/Kexin (PCSK) serine proteases (PC1, PC2, Furin, PC4, PC5, PACE4, PC7, SKI-1/S1P, and PCSK9) participate in post-translational cleavages and/or regulation of multiple secretory proteins. The type-I membrane-bound Furin and SKI-1/S1P are the major convertases responsible for the processing of surface glycoproteins of enveloped viruses. Stefan Kunz has considerably contributed to define the role of SKI-1/S1P in the activation of arenaviruses causing hemorrhagic fever. Furin was recently implicated in the activation of the spike S-protein of SARS-CoV-2 and Furin-inhibitors are being tested as antivirals in COVID-19. Other members of the PCSK-family are also implicated in some viral infections, such as PCSK9 in Dengue. Herein, we summarize the various functions of the PCSKs and present arguments whereby their inhibition could represent a powerful arsenal to limit viral infections causing the present and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Proprotein Convertases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization , Viruses/genetics , Biological Transport , Furin/metabolism , Humans , Proprotein Convertase 9/metabolism , Proprotein Convertases/genetics , Proteolysis , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Envelope/metabolism , Viruses/metabolism
16.
Nat Metab ; 3(7): 909-922, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279905

ABSTRACT

Exosomes represent a subtype of extracellular vesicle that is released through retrograde transport and fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane1. Although no perfect methodologies currently exist for the high-throughput, unbiased isolation of pure plasma exosomes2,3, investigation of exosome-enriched plasma fractions of extracellular vesicles can confer a glimpse into the endocytic pathway on a systems level. Here we conduct high-coverage lipidomics with an emphasis on sterols and oxysterols, and proteomic analyses of exosome-enriched extracellular vesicles (EVs hereafter) from patients at different temporal stages of COVID-19, including the presymptomatic, hyperinflammatory, resolution and convalescent phases. Our study highlights dysregulated raft lipid metabolism that underlies changes in EV lipid membrane anisotropy that alter the exosomal localization of presenilin-1 (PS-1) in the hyperinflammatory phase. We also show in vitro that EVs from different temporal phases trigger distinct metabolic and transcriptional responses in recipient cells, including in alveolar epithelial cells, which denote the primary site of infection, and liver hepatocytes, which represent a distal secondary site. In comparison to the hyperinflammatory phase, EVs from the resolution phase induce opposing effects on eukaryotic translation and Notch signalling. Our results provide insights into cellular lipid metabolism and inter-tissue crosstalk at different stages of COVID-19 and are a resource to increase our understanding of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Lipidomics , Metabolomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Fractionation , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chemical Fractionation , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Exosomes/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
17.
Bioconjug Chem ; 32(6): 1067-1077, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241779

ABSTRACT

Passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to treat neurological conditions is one of the main hurdles in modern medicine. Many drugs with promising in vitro profiles become ineffective in vivo due to BBB restrictive permeability. In particular, this includes drugs such as antiviral porphyrins, with the ability to fight brain-resident viruses causing diseases such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). In the last two decades, BBB shuttles, particularly peptide-based ones, have shown promise in carrying various payloads across the BBB. Thus, peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs) formed by covalent attachment of a BBB peptide shuttle and an antiviral drug may become key therapeutic tools in treating neurological disorders of viral origin. In this study, we have used various approaches (guanidinium, phosphonium, and carbodiimide-based couplings) for on-resin synthesis of new peptide-porphyrin conjugates (PPCs) with BBB-crossing and potential antiviral activity. After careful fine-tuning of the synthetic chemistry, DIC/oxyma has emerged as a preferred method, by which 14 different PPCs have been made and satisfactorily characterized. The PPCs are prepared by coupling a porphyrin carboxyl group to an amino group (either N-terminal or a Lys side chain) of the peptide shuttle and show effective in vitro BBB translocation ability, low cytotoxicity toward mouse brain endothelial cells, and low hemolytic activity. Three of the PPCs, MP-P5, P4-MP, and P4-L-MP, effectively inhibiting HIV infectivity in vitro, stand out as most promising. Their efficacy against other brain-targeting viruses (Dengue, Zika, and SARS-CoV-2) is currently under evaluation, with preliminary results confirming that PPCs are a promising strategy to treat viral brain infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacokinetics , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Peptides/pharmacokinetics , Porphyrins/pharmacokinetics , Animals , Anti-HIV Agents/chemistry , Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacology , Biological Transport , Cell Line , Drug Discovery , HEK293 Cells , HIV/drug effects , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Mice , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , Porphyrins/chemistry , Porphyrins/pharmacology
18.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 321(2): L349-L357, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225725

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 hinders oxygen transport to the consuming tissues by at least two mechanisms: In the injured lung, saturation of hemoglobin is compromised, and in the tissues, an associated anemia reduces the volume of delivered oxygen. For the first problem, increased hemoglobin oxygen affinity [left shift of the oxygen dissociation curve (ODC)] is of advantage, for the second, however, the contrary is the case. Indeed a right shift of the ODC has been found in former studies for anemia caused by reduced cell production or hemolysis. This resulted from increased 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) concentration. In three investigations in COVID-19, however, no change of hemoglobin affinity was detected in spite of probably high [2,3-BPG]. The most plausible cause for this finding is formation of methemoglobin (MetHb), which increases the oxygen affinity and thus apparently compensates for the 2,3-BPG effect. However, this "useful effect" is cancelled by the concomitant reduction of functional hemoglobin. In the largest study on COVID-19, even a clear left shift of the ODC was detected when calculated from measurements in fresh blood rather than after equilibration with gases outside the body. This additional "in vivo" left shift possibly results from various factors, e.g., concentration changes of Cl-, 2,3-BPG, ATP, lactate, nitrocompounds, glutathione, glutamate, because of time delay between blood sampling and end of equilibration, or enlarged distribution space including interstitial fluid and is useful for O2 uptake in the lungs. Under discussion for therapy are the affinity-increasing 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF), erythropoiesis-stimulating substances like erythropoietin, and methylene blue against MetHb formation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Hemoglobins/analysis , Oxygen/blood , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans
19.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100701, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198856

ABSTRACT

The acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system has been shown to be important for cellular infection with at least some viruses, for instance, rhinovirus or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Functional inhibition of the acid sphingomyelinase using tricyclic antidepressants prevented infection of epithelial cells, for instance with SARS-CoV-2. The structure of ambroxol, that is, trans-4-[(2,4-dibromanilin-6-yl)-methyamino]-cyclohexanol, a mucolytic drug applied by inhalation, suggests that the drug might inhibit the acid sphingomyelinase and thereby infection with SARS-CoV-2. To test this, we used vesicular stomatitis virus pseudoviral particles presenting SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on their surface (pp-VSV-SARS-CoV-2 spike), a bona fide system for mimicking SARS-CoV-2 entry into cells. Viral uptake and formation of ceramide localization were determined by fluorescence microscopy, activity of the acid sphingomyelinase by consumption of [14C]sphingomyelin and ceramide was quantified by a kinase method. We found that entry of pp-VSV-SARS-CoV-2 spike required activation of acid sphingomyelinase and release of ceramide, events that were all prevented by pretreatment with ambroxol. We also obtained nasal epithelial cells from human volunteers prior to and after inhalation of ambroxol. Inhalation of ambroxol reduced acid sphingomyelinase activity in nasal epithelial cells and prevented pp-VSV-SARS-CoV-2 spike-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation, ceramide release, and entry of pp-VSV-SARS-CoV-2 spike ex vivo. The addition of purified acid sphingomyelinase or C16 ceramide restored entry of pp-VSV-SARS-CoV-2 spike into ambroxol-treated epithelial cells. We propose that ambroxol might be suitable for clinical studies to prevent coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Ambroxol/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/genetics , Vesiculovirus/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Administration, Inhalation , Animals , Biological Transport , Ceramides/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Repositioning , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/enzymology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Expectorants , Gene Expression , Humans , Primary Cell Culture , Reassortant Viruses/drug effects , Reassortant Viruses/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/antagonists & inhibitors , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/metabolism , Sphingomyelins/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Vesiculovirus/physiology
20.
Cells ; 10(3)2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147459

ABSTRACT

Intracellular organelles enwrapped in membranes along with a complex network of vesicles trafficking in, out and inside the cellular environment are one of the main features of eukaryotic cells. Given their central role in cell life, compartmentalization and mechanisms allowing their maintenance despite continuous crosstalk among different organelles have been deeply investigated over the past years. Here, we review the multiple functions exerted by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery in driving membrane remodeling and fission, as well as in repairing physiological and pathological membrane damages. In this way, ESCRT machinery enables different fundamental cellular processes, such as cell cytokinesis, biogenesis of organelles and vesicles, maintenance of nuclear-cytoplasmic compartmentalization, endolysosomal activity. Furthermore, we discuss some examples of how viruses, as obligate intracellular parasites, have evolved to hijack the ESCRT machinery or part of it to execute/optimize their replication cycle/infection. A special emphasis is given to the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) interaction with the ESCRT proteins, considering the peculiarities of this interplay and the need for HSV-1 to cross both the nuclear-cytoplasmic and the cytoplasmic-extracellular environment compartmentalization to egress from infected cells.


Subject(s)
Biological Transport/physiology , Cells/metabolism , Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport/physiology , Viruses/metabolism , Humans
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