Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.114
Filter
2.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 28(1): 1-2, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2189205
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e062177, 2022 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137732

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To undertake a UK-based James Lind Alliance (JLA) Priority Setting Partnership for elbow conditions and be representative of the views of patients, carers and healthcare professionals (HCPs). SETTING: This was a national collaborative study organised through the British Elbow and Shoulder Society. PARTICIPANTS: Adult patients, carers and HCPs who have managed or experienced elbow conditions, their carers and HCPs in the UK involved in managing of elbow conditions. METHODS: The rigorous JLA priority setting methodology was followed. Electronic and paper scoping surveys were distributed to identify potential research priority questions (RPQs). Initial responses were reviewed and a literature search was performed to cross-check categorised questions. Those questions already sufficiently answered were excluded and the remaining questions were ranked in a second survey according to priority for future elbow conditions research. Using the JLA methodology, responses from HCP and patients were combined to create a list of the top 18 questions. These were further reviewed in a dedicated multistakeholder workshop where the top 10 RPQs were agreed by consensus. RESULTS: The process was completed over 24 months. The initial survey resulted in 467 questions from 165 respondents (73% HCPs and 27% patients/carers). These questions were reviewed and combined into 46 summary topics comprising: tendinopathy, distal biceps pathology, arthritis, stiffness, trauma, arthroplasty and cubital tunnel syndrome. The second (interim prioritisation) survey had 250 respondents (72% HCP and 28% patients/carers). The top 18 ranked questions from this survey were taken to the final workshop where a consensus was reached on the top 10 RPQs. CONCLUSIONS: The top 10 RPQs highlight areas of importance that currently lack sufficient evidence to guide diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of elbow conditions. This collaborative process will guide researchers and funders regarding the topics that should receive most future attention and benefit patients and HCPs.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Elbow Joint , Adult , Humans , Elbow , Caregivers , Health Personnel
6.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(2): 172-173, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145156
7.
Can J Diet Pract Res ; 83(4): 212-224, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141557

ABSTRACT

The 2022 Dietitians of Canada (DC) National Conference brought together our nutrition and dietetics community for a successful virtual event on September 15 & 16, 2022. We have had three virtual conferences due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but that has not prevented us from sharing our experiences and research. This year the Canadian Foundation for Dietetic Research (CFDR) showcased a wide variety of experience sharing and research abstracts through the online conference platform. There were 33 Early Bird (EB) research abstracts, in which five were selected for live presentations during the conference, and ten Late Breaking research abstracts. Thirty-one posters were presented virtually at the conference. Thank you for all of the abstract submissions! A sincere thank you to the Abstract Review Committee members for their support, dedication and commitment. Early Bird Abstract Review Committee: Susan Campisi (University of Toronto); Pauline Darling (University of Ottawa); Andrea Glenn (University of Toronto); Mahsa Jessri (University of British Columbia); Shelley Vanderhout (University of Toronto). Late Breaking Abstract Review Committee: Lesley Andrade (University of Waterloo); Carla D'Andreamatteo (Consultant, Winnipeg); Pauline Darling (University of Ottawa); Laura Forbes (University of Guelph); Billie Jane Hermosura (University of Ottawa); Christine Nash (University Health Network). Thanks to the DC Conference team, all of the moderators and conference attendees for supporting the virtual and poster research presentations. Please consider submitting an abstract for the 2023 CFDR Research Showcase. Looking forward to seeing all of you at the 2023 Dietitians of Canada Conference in Montreal, QC, from May 24-26, 2023. Warm regards, Christina Lengyel, PhD, RD Chair, 2022 EB/LB Abstract Committees Professor Food and Human Nutritional Sciences University of Manitoba Ravi Sidhu Managing Director Development & Operations CFDR.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Canada , Universities
9.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 19987, 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133628

ABSTRACT

Despite the efficacy, safety, and availability of COVID-19 vaccines, a lack of awareness and trust of vaccine safety research remains an important barrier to public health. The goal of this research was to design and test online meta-summaries-transparent, interactive summaries of the state of relevant studies-to improve people's awareness and opinion of vaccine safety research. We used insights from a set of co-design interviews (n = 22) to develop meta-summaries to highlight metascientific information about vaccine safety research. An experiment with 863 unvaccinated participants showed that our meta-summaries increased participants' perception of the amount, consistency, and direction of vaccine safety research relative to the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) webpage, and that participants found them more trustworthy than the CDC page as well. They were also more likely to discuss it with others in the week following. We conclude that direct summaries of scientific research can be a useful communication tool for controversial scientific topics.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Trust , Communication
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(40): e2213996119, 2022 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2122958
13.
Global Health ; 18(1): 92, 2022 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108844

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Amidst the climate crisis, a key goal of the medical sector is to reduce its large carbon footprint. Although the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic greatly impacted the medical sector, its influence on carbon footprints remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the carbon footprint of a university hospital with a medical research centre over the past 10 years. METHODS: Data on electricity, gas, and water usage, pharmaceutical and medical supply costs, and waste amounts were recorded for Nagoya University Hospital from April 2010 to March 2021. The relevant emission factors were obtained from the Japanese government and the overall monthly carbon footprint was reported according to the Greenhouse Gas Protocol. The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the carbon footprint was then compared for three types of emission sources. Moreover, a regression model was used to plot quadratic functions as approximate functions using monthly carbon emissions and monthly average external temperatures. Finally, the monthly carbon footprint was calculated per hospital admission. RESULTS: The overall carbon footprint of the hospital was 73,546 tCO2e in 2020, revealing an increase of 26.60% over the last 10 years. Carbon emissions from electricity consumption represented 26% of total emissions. The individual carbon footprints of pharmaceuticals, medical supplies, waste, and water usage also increased from 2010 to 2020. The overall monthly carbon footprint was positively correlated with the average monthly temperature (R2 = 0.7566, p < 0.001). Compared with 2019, the overall carbon footprint decreased by 2.19% in 2020. Moreover, the monthly carbon footprint per hospital admission increased significantly between 2018 (0.24 tCO2e/admission) and 2020 (0.26 tCO2e/admission) (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: The overall carbon footprint of the hospital generally increased over the last decade. During the COVID-19 epidemic in 2020, the carbon footprint decreased slightly, likely because of the reduced number of patients. However, the carbon footprint per admission increased, which was attributed to more complicated patient backgrounds because of the ageing population. Therefore, evaluation of carbon emissions in the medical sector is urgently required in order to act on the climate crisis as soon as possible.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Humans , Carbon Footprint , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Carbon , Water , Hospitals
15.
Top Antivir Med ; 30(2): 419-425, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2102685

ABSTRACT

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2022, which was held as a virtual conference, continues to serve as the preeminent forum that features research advances in HIV-1 and its associated coinfections. The conference has extended its area of coverage to include research advances in SARS- CoV-2. As pointed out in the presentation from Hatziioannou in the New Investigators workshop, there has been an explosion in research activity on SARS-CoV-2 that has eclipsed that for HIV-1. In the past 12 months, there were approximately 6600 publications on HIV-1 and approximately 64,000 on SARS-CoV-2. Although these numbers include review articles, they reveal the tremendous response by researchers to the existential threats posed by lentiviruses and coronaviruses. This poses challenges for any conference committee tasked with selecting abstracts for presentation from the large number submitted for consideration. CROI organizers have consistently been able to assemble a program that, through invited presentations, abstract-driven talks, posters, interactive sessions, workshops, and symposia, showcases the most recent research advances.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , HIV-1 , Retroviridae Infections , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Surg Endosc ; 34(10): 4225-4232, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2094619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and general surgeons are being challenged by the current pandemic. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) aimed to evaluate surgeons' experiences and perspectives, to identify gaps in knowledge, to record shortcomings in resources and to register research priorities. METHODS: An ad hoc web-based survey of EAES members and affiliates was developed by the EAES Research Committee. The questionnaire consisted of 69 items divided into the following sections: (Ι) demographics, (II) institutional burdens and management strategies, and (III) analysis of resource, knowledge, and evidence gaps. Descriptive statistics were summarized as frequencies, medians, ranges,, and interquartile ranges, as appropriate. RESULTS: The survey took place between March 25th and April 16th with a total of 550 surgeons from 79 countries. Eighty-one percent had to postpone elective cases or suspend their practice and 35% assumed roles not related to their primary expertise. One-fourth of respondents reported having encountered abdominal pathologies in COVID-19-positive patients, most frequently acute appendicitis (47% of respondents). The effect of protective measures in surgical or endoscopic procedures on infected patients, the effect of endoscopic surgery on infected patients, and the infectivity of positive patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery were prioritized as knowledge gaps and research priorities. CONCLUSIONS: Perspectives and priorities of EAES members in the era of the pandemic are hereto summarized. Research evidence is urgently needed to effectively respond to challenges arisen from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biomedical Research , Coronavirus Infections , Endoscopy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Europe , Health Care Rationing/methods , Health Care Rationing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surgeons , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Elife ; 112022 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056252

ABSTRACT

Physician-scientists have epitomized the blending of deep, rigorous impactful curiosity with broad attention to human health for centuries. While we aspire to prepare all physicians with an appreciation for these skills, those who apply them to push the understanding of the boundaries of human physiology and disease, to advance treatments, and to increase our knowledge base in the arena of human health can fulfill an essential space for our society, economies, and overall well-being. Working arm in arm with basic and translational scientists as well as expert clinicians, as peers in both groups, this career additionally serves as a bridge to facilitate the pace and direction of research that ultimately impacts health. Globally, there are remarkable similarities in challenges in this career path, and in the approaches employed to overcome them. Herein, we review how different countries train physician-scientists and suggest strategies to further bolster this career path.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Physicians , Biomedical Research/education , Career Choice , Humans
20.
Acad Med ; 97(10): 1536-1545, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051576

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Physician-scientists have long been considered an endangered species, and their extended training pathway is vulnerable to disruptions. This study investigated the effects of COVID-19-related challenges on the personal lives, career activities, stress levels, and research productivity of physician-scientist trainees and faculty. METHOD: The authors surveyed medical students (MS), graduate students (GS), residents/fellows (R/F), and faculty (F) using a tool distributed to 120 U.S. institutions with MD-PhD programs in April-June 2020. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare differences between groups. Machine learning was employed to select variables for multivariate logistic regression analyses aimed at identifying factors associated with stress and impaired productivity. RESULTS: The analyses included 1,929 respondents (MS: n = 679, 35%; GS: n = 676, 35%; R/F: n = 274, 14%; F: n = 300, 16%). All cohorts reported high levels of social isolation, stress from effects of the pandemic, and negative impacts on productivity. R/F and F respondents were more likely than MS and GS respondents to report financial difficulties due to COVID-19. R/F and F respondents with a dual degree expressed more impaired productivity compared with those without a dual degree. Multivariate regression analyses identified impacted research/scholarly activities, financial difficulties, and social isolation as predictors of stress and impaired productivity for both MS and GS cohorts. For both R/F and F cohorts, impacted personal life and research productivity were associated with stress, while dual-degree status, impacted research/scholarly activities, and impacted personal life were predictors of impaired productivity. More female than male respondents reported increased demands at home. CONCLUSIONS: This national survey of physician-scientist trainees and faculty found a high incidence of stress and impaired productivity related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the challenges faced and their consequences may improve efforts to support the physician-scientist workforce in the postpandemic period.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Physicians , Students, Medical , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL