Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 76
Filter
2.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(8): e222-e233, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595466

ABSTRACT

For the past 20 years, the notion of bioterror has been a source of considerable fear and panic worldwide. In response to the terror attacks of 2001 in the USA, extensive research funding was awarded to investigate bioterror-related pathogens. The global scientific legacy of this funding has extended into the present day, highlighted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Unsurprisingly, the surge in biodefence-related research and preparedness has been met with considerable apprehension and opposition. Here, we briefly outline the history of modern bioterror threats and biodefence research, describe the scientific legacy of biodefence research by highlighting advances pertaining to specific bacterial and viral pathogens, and summarise the future of biodefence research and its relevance today. We sought to address the sizeable question: have the past 20 years of investment into biodefence research and preparedness been worth it? The legacy of modern biodefence funding includes advancements in biosecurity, biosurveillence, diagnostics, medical countermeasures, and vaccines. In summary, we feel that these advances justify the substantial biodefence funding trend of the past two decades and set a precedent for future funding.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/economics , Bioterrorism/prevention & control , Financial Support , Humans , Investments , Risk Assessment , Vaccines/immunology
5.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 54: 151805, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336215

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have shown that relatively few MD, DO, and underrepresented in medicine (URM) students and physicians are matching into pathology residency in the United States (US). In the 2021 Main Residency Match, just 33.6% of filled pathology residency positions were taken by senior year students at US allopathic medical schools. This has been attributed to the fact that pathology is not a required rotation in most US medical schools, pathology is often taught in an integrated curriculum in the US where is does not stand out as a distinct field, and because the COVID-19 pandemic led to a suspension of in-person pathology rotations and electives. Ultimately, many US medical students fail to consider pathology as a career pathway. The objective of this article is to provide medical students with basic information, in the form of frequently asked questions (FAQs), about pathology training and career opportunities. This was accomplished by forming a team of MD and DO pathology attendings, pathology trainees, and a medical student from multiple institutions to create a pathology guide for medical students. This guide includes information about post-sophomore fellowships, 5 major pathology residency tracks, more than 20 fellowship pathways, and allopathic and osteopathic board examinations. This guide also contains photographs and descriptions of major pathology sub-specialties, including the daily and on-call duties and responsibilities of pathology residents. The exciting future of pathology is also discussed. This guide supports the agenda of the College of American Pathologists' (CAP) Pathologist Pipeline Initiative to improve student recruitment into pathology.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Fellowships and Scholarships , Internship and Residency , Pathology/education , Students, Medical , Biomedical Research/economics , Biomedical Research/education , Humans , Pathology/economics , Pathology/methods , Periodicals as Topic , Research Support as Topic , Specialization , United States
8.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(7): 499-503, 2021.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311322

ABSTRACT

Access to vaccines against covid-19 is a very topical issue. On the one hand, we are suffering from supply problems and inadequate availability of doses both nationally and internationally. On the other hand, public health needs do not coincide with those of the market economy: the need to vaccinate the entire world population to overcome the pandemic cannot be satisfied due to market rules and limits in production processes. The result is a radical inequality in access to vaccines. We are aware of the delicate balance between health and economy: the latter cannot ignore the former. Also for this reason, the demand for greater equity in access to vaccines is growing: the race for innovation may not be hindered by a targeted relaxation of the rules on intellectual property during a pandemic health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug Development , Intellectual Property , Biomedical Research/economics , COVID-19 Vaccines/economics , Diffusion of Innovation , Global Health , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Italy , Needs Assessment , Patents as Topic , Public Health , Research Support as Topic/economics , Vaccination Coverage
10.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 106: 106438, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230388

ABSTRACT

With billions of dollars in research and development (R&D) funding continuing to be invested, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become into a singular focus for the scientific community. However, the collective response from the scientific communities have seen poor return on investment, particularly for therapeutic research for COVID-19, revealing the existing weaknesses and inefficiencies of the clinical trial enterprise. In this article, we argue for the importance of structural changes to existing research programs for clinical trials in light of the lessons learned from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Protocols/standards , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/economics , Biomedical Research/standards , Clinical Trials as Topic/economics , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Clin Trials ; 18(4): 511-513, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195906

ABSTRACT

The proposed triple aim of health care-enhanced patient experience, improved population health, and reduced per capita costs-can be applied to clinical research. A triple aim for clinical research would (1) improve the individual research participant's experience; (2) promote the health of populations; and (3) reduce per capita costs of clinical research. Such an approach is possible by designing trials around the needs of participants rather than sites, embracing digital measures of health, and advancing decentralized studies. Recent studies, including those evaluating therapies for COVID-19, have demonstrated the value of such an approach. Accelerating the adoption of these methods can help fulfill this new triple aim of clinical research.


Subject(s)
Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Goals , Population Health , Research Subjects , Research Support as Topic , Biomedical Research/economics , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Clinical Trials as Topic/economics , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Costs and Cost Analysis , Health Promotion , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine
14.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 19(1): 54, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166914

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has shed a spotlight on the resilience of healthcare systems, and their ability to cope efficiently and effectively with unexpected crises. If we are to learn one economic lesson from the pandemic, arguably it is the perils of an overfocus on short-term allocative efficiency at the price of lack of capacity to deal with uncertain future challenges. In normal times, building spare capacity with 'option value' into health systems may seem inefficient, the costs potentially exceeding the benefits. Yet the fatal weakness of not doing so is that this can leave health systems highly constrained when dealing with unexpected, but ultimately inevitable, shocks-such as the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, we argue that the pandemic has highlighted the potentially enormous option value of biomedical research infrastructure. We illustrate this with reference to COVID-19 response work supported by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre. As the world deals with the fallout from the most serious economic crisis since the Great Depression, pressure will soon come to review government expenditure, including research funding. Developing a framework to fully account for option value, and understanding the public appetite to pay for it, should allow us to be better prepared for the next emerging problem.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Research Support as Topic , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine/economics , United Kingdom/epidemiology
17.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(584)2021 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127538

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic halted research operations at academic medical centers. This shutdown has adversely affected research infrastructure, the current research workforce, and the research pipeline. We discuss the impact of the pandemic on overall research operations, examine its disproportionate effect on underrepresented minority researchers, and provide concrete strategies to reverse these losses.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Biomedical Research/economics , Humans , Minority Groups , Research Support as Topic/economics
19.
Cancer Discov ; 11(3): 527-528, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119343

ABSTRACT

As vice president, Joe Biden was the cancer advocate-in-chief. As president, he has a different public health crisis to deal with-COVID-19-but given Biden's passion for cancer research, many expect he will build on the previous Moonshot initiative with another push to accelerate the pace of progress in cancer control.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/economics , Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Policy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Politics , COVID-19/economics , Financing, Government , Government Programs/organization & administration , Humans , Organizational Objectives , Pandemics , Research Support as Topic , United States
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL