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1.
Surg Endosc ; 34(10): 4225-4232, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2094619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and general surgeons are being challenged by the current pandemic. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) aimed to evaluate surgeons' experiences and perspectives, to identify gaps in knowledge, to record shortcomings in resources and to register research priorities. METHODS: An ad hoc web-based survey of EAES members and affiliates was developed by the EAES Research Committee. The questionnaire consisted of 69 items divided into the following sections: (Ι) demographics, (II) institutional burdens and management strategies, and (III) analysis of resource, knowledge, and evidence gaps. Descriptive statistics were summarized as frequencies, medians, ranges,, and interquartile ranges, as appropriate. RESULTS: The survey took place between March 25th and April 16th with a total of 550 surgeons from 79 countries. Eighty-one percent had to postpone elective cases or suspend their practice and 35% assumed roles not related to their primary expertise. One-fourth of respondents reported having encountered abdominal pathologies in COVID-19-positive patients, most frequently acute appendicitis (47% of respondents). The effect of protective measures in surgical or endoscopic procedures on infected patients, the effect of endoscopic surgery on infected patients, and the infectivity of positive patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery were prioritized as knowledge gaps and research priorities. CONCLUSIONS: Perspectives and priorities of EAES members in the era of the pandemic are hereto summarized. Research evidence is urgently needed to effectively respond to challenges arisen from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biomedical Research , Coronavirus Infections , Endoscopy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Europe , Health Care Rationing/methods , Health Care Rationing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surgeons , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Health Expect ; 25(4): 1619-1632, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961577

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: British Pakistani women have exceptionally high rates of obesity and yet are seldom heard in a research priority setting concerning weight management. The objectives of this study were (i) to ascertain what multisectoral professionals perceive to be the most pressing unmet obesity needs or topic areas that need more research in relation to Pakistani women living in deprived areas of Bradford and (ii) to determine the top 10 obesity health priorities for this group to develop an obesity research agenda. METHODS: A two-step process was adopted using the following: (i) a survey of a wide range of multisectoral professional stakeholders (n = 159) and (ii) a ranking exercise involving Pakistani women living in deprived areas of Bradford (n = 32) to select and prioritize their top 10 obesity health concerns and unmet needs from a list of 31 statements identified in the survey and previous research. Survey data were analysed using inductive content analysis and themes were identified. Themes were translated into statements to be ranked by Pakistani women. The ranking exercise was conducted by telephone either via voice or video call. Data were analysed using a reverse scoring system. RESULTS: Survey responses were grouped into statements reflecting the following three categories: education needs; healthy behaviour barriers and mental well-being. The highest rankings were given by Pakistani women to statements on mental health and the need for education. The top 10 prioritized statements were developed with members of the public into an obesity research agenda that reflected the target population. CONCLUSION: Actively engaging British Pakistani women in setting research priorities provided a unique opportunity to understand the key areas they think are important for future research. The culminating research agenda can be used by researchers to advance the field of obesity research in Pakistani communities, thus producing research outputs that are relevant to and have impact in this population. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Participants in the ranking exercise collected data. Public contributors were involved in developing the prioritized statements into a research agenda.


Subject(s)
Health Priorities , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Services Research , Obesity , Poverty Areas , Social Determinants of Health , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Health Services Research/methods , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Pakistan/ethnology , Social Determinants of Health/statistics & numerical data , Stakeholder Participation , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 18(1): e1009719, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662438

ABSTRACT

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the power to improve our lives through a wide variety of applications, many of which fall into the healthcare space; however, a lack of diversity is contributing to limitations in how broadly AI can help people. The UCSF AI4ALL program was established in 2019 to address this issue by targeting high school students from underrepresented backgrounds in AI, giving them a chance to learn about AI with a focus on biomedicine, and promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2020, the UCSF AI4ALL three-week program was held entirely online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, students participated virtually to gain experience with AI, interact with diverse role models in AI, and learn about advancing health through AI. Specifically, they attended lectures in coding and AI, received an in-depth research experience through hands-on projects exploring COVID-19, and engaged in mentoring and personal development sessions with faculty, researchers, industry professionals, and undergraduate and graduate students, many of whom were women and from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. At the conclusion of the program, the students presented the results of their research projects at the final symposium. Comparison of pre- and post-program survey responses from students demonstrated that after the program, significantly more students were familiar with how to work with data and to evaluate and apply machine learning algorithms. There were also nominally significant increases in the students' knowing people in AI from historically underrepresented groups, feeling confident in discussing AI, and being aware of careers in AI. We found that we were able to engage young students in AI via our online training program and nurture greater diversity in AI. This work can guide AI training programs aspiring to engage and educate students entirely online, and motivate people in AI to strive towards increasing diversity and inclusion in this field.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Biomedical Research , Computational Biology , Cultural Diversity , Mentoring , Adolescent , Biomedical Research/education , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Computational Biology/education , Computational Biology/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Students
7.
Int Urol Nephrol ; 54(3): 493-498, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653676

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown had a substantial impact on normal research operations. Researchers needed to adapt their methods to engage at-home participants. One method is crowdsourcing, in which researchers use social media to recruit participants, gather data, and collect samples. We utilized this method to develop a diagnostic test for Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS). Participants were recruited via posts on popular social-media platforms, and enrolled via a website. Participants received and returned a mail kit containing bladder symptom surveys and a urine sample cup containing room-temperature preservative. Using this method, we collected 1254 IC/BPS and control samples in 3 months from all 50 United States. Our data demonstrate that crowdsourcing is a viable alternative to traditional research, with the ability to reach a broad patient population rapidly. Crowdsourcing is a powerful tool for at-home participation in research, particularly during the lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Crowdsourcing/methods , Cystitis, Interstitial , Patient Participation , Urinalysis , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cystitis, Interstitial/diagnosis , Cystitis, Interstitial/epidemiology , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/supply & distribution , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Specimen Handling/methods , United States/epidemiology , Urinalysis/instrumentation , Urinalysis/methods
10.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0259965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546945

ABSTRACT

As scientific research becomes increasingly cross-disciplinary, many universities seek to support collaborative activity through new buildings and institutions. This study examines the impacts of spatial proximity on collaboration at MIT from 2005 to 2015. By exploiting a shift in the location of researchers due to building renovations, we evaluate how discrete changes in physical proximity affect the likelihood that researchers co-author. The findings suggest that moving researchers into the same building increases their propensity to collaborate, with the effect plateauing five years after the move. The effects are large when compared to the average rate of collaboration among pairs of researchers, which suggests that spatial proximity is an important tool to support cross-disciplinary collaborative science. Furthermore, buildings that host researchers working in the same or related fields and from multiple departments have a larger effect on their propensity to collaborate.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Interdisciplinary Communication , Spatial Behavior , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Facility Design and Construction , Humans , Movement , Research Personnel/psychology , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data
12.
Elife ; 92020 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497821
14.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(5): 775-778, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476710

ABSTRACT

Cervical cancer is a global health problem which disproportionally affects women in low- and middle- income countries. The World Health Organization recently launched its global strategy to eliminate this disease in the next two decades. For those women diagnosed today with cervical cancer better strategies are needed to improve outcome and reduce treatment-related morbidity. Clinical trials are critical to shaping future treatment, and much has been achieved already. However, such opportunities are limited in low resource settings, and the Cervical Cancer Research Network is dedicated to expanding access to new technologies in surgery, radiation, and medical oncology. In this article we review the status of the trials portfolio and outline future objectives, including the launch of a number of research grants for aspiring or established researchers in low- and middle-income settings.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy , Developing Countries , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Global Health , Humans , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis
16.
FASEB J ; 35(11): e21973, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462504

ABSTRACT

Contemporary science has become increasingly multi-disciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. Collaborative research efforts have enabled investigators to respond to the demands of an increasingly complex 21st century landscape, including pressing scientific challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For over 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs-led by the National Institutes of Health-is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Intersectoral Collaboration , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Career Mobility , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Policy , Program Evaluation , Research Support as Topic , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , Universities/organization & administration
17.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
18.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 90, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436228

ABSTRACT

Sustainable and equitable partnerships and collaborations between the Global North and Global South (as well as within the Global South) have been aspirations (if seldom achieved) of the "global health" endeavor over the past couple of decades. The COVID-19 pandemic led to global lockdowns that disrupted international travel and severely challenged these partnerships, providing a critical space for self-reflection on global health as a discipline. One major global north-south partnership is that between the African Forum for Research and Education in Health (AFREhealth) and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH). This article reports on a recent Satellite meeting of the AFREhealth-CUGH Working Group (ACWG) at the CUGH 2021 virtual conference in March 2021 that provided insights on North-South and South-South global health partnerships, against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors describe challenges and opportunities for research and education in these partnerships (as discussed at this ACWG Satellite meeting), and implications for the field of global health going forward as we emerge from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Africa/epidemiology , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Universities/organization & administration
20.
J Occup Health Psychol ; 26(4): 259-260, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397840

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to generate threats to occupational health, safety, and well-being. As a result, it presents an opportunity to deepen the field's insights into occupational health psychology (OHP), and to offer practical guidance that may help workers, organizations, and society mitigate the pandemic's negative effects. This special section of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (JOHP) addresses several implications of the pandemic for well-being and work behavior. The pandemic raises many additional questions deserving of research attention. Such topics include the implications of organizations' evolving workforce and workplace decisions, and work as a mechanism for public health and societal well-being. OHP research also has the potential to generate ideas that may prove useful for addressing future crises. A greater consideration of context may help the field achieve such aims. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Health , Psychology, Industrial , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Psychology, Industrial/organization & administration , Psychology, Industrial/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology
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