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1.
Elife ; 92020 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497821
4.
FASEB J ; 35(11): e21973, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462504

ABSTRACT

Contemporary science has become increasingly multi-disciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. Collaborative research efforts have enabled investigators to respond to the demands of an increasingly complex 21st century landscape, including pressing scientific challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For over 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs-led by the National Institutes of Health-is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Intersectoral Collaboration , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Career Mobility , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Policy , Program Evaluation , Research Support as Topic , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , Universities/organization & administration
5.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
6.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 90, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436228

ABSTRACT

Sustainable and equitable partnerships and collaborations between the Global North and Global South (as well as within the Global South) have been aspirations (if seldom achieved) of the "global health" endeavor over the past couple of decades. The COVID-19 pandemic led to global lockdowns that disrupted international travel and severely challenged these partnerships, providing a critical space for self-reflection on global health as a discipline. One major global north-south partnership is that between the African Forum for Research and Education in Health (AFREhealth) and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH). This article reports on a recent Satellite meeting of the AFREhealth-CUGH Working Group (ACWG) at the CUGH 2021 virtual conference in March 2021 that provided insights on North-South and South-South global health partnerships, against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors describe challenges and opportunities for research and education in these partnerships (as discussed at this ACWG Satellite meeting), and implications for the field of global health going forward as we emerge from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Africa/epidemiology , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Universities/organization & administration
7.
J Occup Health Psychol ; 26(4): 259-260, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397840

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to generate threats to occupational health, safety, and well-being. As a result, it presents an opportunity to deepen the field's insights into occupational health psychology (OHP), and to offer practical guidance that may help workers, organizations, and society mitigate the pandemic's negative effects. This special section of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (JOHP) addresses several implications of the pandemic for well-being and work behavior. The pandemic raises many additional questions deserving of research attention. Such topics include the implications of organizations' evolving workforce and workplace decisions, and work as a mechanism for public health and societal well-being. OHP research also has the potential to generate ideas that may prove useful for addressing future crises. A greater consideration of context may help the field achieve such aims. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Health , Psychology, Industrial , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Psychology, Industrial/organization & administration , Psychology, Industrial/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology
8.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397297

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emergence of COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased use of telemedicine in health care delivery. Telemedicine facilitates long-term clinical care for monitoring and prevention of complications of diabetes mellitus. GUIDELINES: Precise indications for teleconsultation, clinical care services which can be provided, and good clinical practices to be followed during teleconsultation are explained. Guidance on risk assessment and health education for diabetes risk factors, counselling for blood glucose monitoring, treatment compliance, and prevention of complications are described. CONCLUSION: The guidelines will help physicians in adopting teleconsultation for management of diabetes mellitus, facilitate access to diabetes care and improve health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Remote Consultation/standards , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Expert Testimony , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards
9.
Cytometry A ; 97(9): 882-886, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384154

ABSTRACT

Operating shared resource laboratories (SRLs) in times of pandemic is a challenge for research institutions. In a multiuser, high-turnover working space, the transmission of infectious agents is difficult to control. To address this challenge, imaging core facility managers being members of German BioImaging discussed how shared microscopes could be operated with minimal risk of spreading SARS-CoV-2 between users and staff. Here, we describe the resulting guidelines and explain their rationale, with a focus on separating users in space and time, protective face masks, and keeping surfaces virus-free. These recommendations may prove useful for other types of SRLs. © 2020 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. on behalf of International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control , Laboratories/organization & administration , Microscopy , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Decontamination , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Germany , Humans , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protective Factors , Research Personnel/organization & administration , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Workflow
11.
PLoS Med ; 18(8): e1003753, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379823

ABSTRACT

Peter Kilmarx and Roger Glass discuss strengthening health research capabilities as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Capacity Building/statistics & numerical data , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Humans
12.
Genome Biol ; 22(1): 234, 2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365378
16.
Nat Biomed Eng ; 5(7): 637-638, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333943
20.
Global Health ; 17(1): 84, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial research requirements in pandemics are predictable. But how is it possible to study a disease that is so quickly spreading and to rapidly use that research to inform control and treatment? MAIN BODY: In our view, a dilemma with such wide-reaching impact mandates multi-disciplinary collaborations on a global scale. International research collaboration is the only means to rapidly address these fundamental questions and potentially change the paradigm of data sharing for the benefit of patients throughout the world. International research collaboration presents significant benefits but also barriers that need to be surmounted, especially in low- and middle-income countries. CONCLUSION: Facilitating international cooperation, by building capacity in established collaborative platforms and in low- and middle-income countries, is imperative to efficiently answering the priority clinical research questions that can change the trajectory of a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Capacity Building , Global Health , International Cooperation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
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