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4.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 46(3): 472-480, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909855

ABSTRACT

The Mississippi IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (Grant P20GM103476) launched the new Mississippi INBRE Outreach Scholars (MIOS) summer research program in 2019. The program was designed to offer students community outreach and research experiences related to the study of behavioral and health disparities life sciences. The program was adapted in early 2020 to offer the program in a fully online format in the summer of 2020. This article details the program adaptations and discusses program evaluation data related to scholars' perceptions of program benefits and expectations and their confidence in research-related skills. The program evaluation was a mixed-method approach that included a qualitative postprogram survey and a pre-post quantitative survey. Scholars identified technical and communication skill building and resilience as areas of personal growth. Overall, the program met scholars' expectations for the program and significantly improved their confidence on 8 of the 19 (with confidence interval estimated differences from 0.3 to 2.56, where a difference of 1 is an improvement across 1 anchor on a Likert-type scale) various research-related tasks/skills after completion of the program. The analyses presented demonstrated that a combined qualitative and quantitative analysis approach is useful for examining the extent to which programs such as Mississippi INBRE are meeting goals of providing a rich research experience in health disparities for a diverse student body. Future longitudinal data may be examined to explore the long-term impact of MIOS on career preparation and choices and graduate education.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The Mississippi INBRE Outreach Scholars program is a summer research program for Mississippi college students that was successfully adapted to a fully online environment amidst the coronavirus-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Biological Science Disciplines , Biomedical Research/standards , Community-Institutional Relations , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Mississippi , Program Evaluation/methods , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Virtual Reality
11.
PLoS Med ; 18(10): e1003793, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The importance of infectious disease epidemic forecasting and prediction research is underscored by decades of communicable disease outbreaks, including COVID-19. Unlike other fields of medical research, such as clinical trials and systematic reviews, no reporting guidelines exist for reporting epidemic forecasting and prediction research despite their utility. We therefore developed the EPIFORGE checklist, a guideline for standardized reporting of epidemic forecasting research. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed this checklist using a best-practice process for development of reporting guidelines, involving a Delphi process and broad consultation with an international panel of infectious disease modelers and model end users. The objectives of these guidelines are to improve the consistency, reproducibility, comparability, and quality of epidemic forecasting reporting. The guidelines are not designed to advise scientists on how to perform epidemic forecasting and prediction research, but rather to serve as a standard for reporting critical methodological details of such studies. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines have been submitted to the EQUATOR network, in addition to hosting by other dedicated webpages to facilitate feedback and journal endorsement.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Checklist/standards , Epidemics , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Research Design , Biomedical Research/methods , Checklist/methods , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Epidemics/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting/methods , Humans , Reproducibility of Results
14.
Healthc Policy ; 17(1): 17-24, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1431157

ABSTRACT

The unequal social and economic burden of the COVID-19 pandemic is evident in racialized and low-income communities across Canada. Importantly, social inequities have not been adequately addressed and current public policies are not reflective of the needs of diverse populations. Public participation in decision-making is crucial and there is, therefore, a pressing need to increase diversity of representation in patient partnerships in order to prevent the further exclusion of socially marginalized groups from research and policy making. Deliberate effort and affirmative action are needed to meaningfully engage and nurture diverse patient partnerships by broadening the scope of the patient community to include excluded or underrepresented individuals or groups. This will help us co-develop ways to enhance access and equity in healthcare and prevent the systematic reproduction of structural inequalities that have already been heightened by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Equity/standards , Health Policy , Patient Selection , Research Design/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Canada , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Heart ; 107(19): 1600-1601, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409293
17.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397297

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emergence of COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased use of telemedicine in health care delivery. Telemedicine facilitates long-term clinical care for monitoring and prevention of complications of diabetes mellitus. GUIDELINES: Precise indications for teleconsultation, clinical care services which can be provided, and good clinical practices to be followed during teleconsultation are explained. Guidance on risk assessment and health education for diabetes risk factors, counselling for blood glucose monitoring, treatment compliance, and prevention of complications are described. CONCLUSION: The guidelines will help physicians in adopting teleconsultation for management of diabetes mellitus, facilitate access to diabetes care and improve health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Remote Consultation/standards , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Expert Testimony , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards
18.
Ethics Hum Res ; 43(5): 42-44, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396864

ABSTRACT

With the rapid spread of SARS-CoV2 has come a rapid proliferation of clinical research studies, resulting in considerable strain on research ethics committees (RECS), which need to review study proposals. RECs are pressured to move through the review process quickly so that studies can get underway to address the pandemic. These committees are also asked to increase efficiency without relaxing the standards for ethical review. RECs are accustomed to external pressure for approval from investigators; however, in the Covid-19 era, this pressure is coming from not only the sponsors and investigators but also many other stakeholders, including world leaders, the community, the media, and professional organizations. Drawing on the authors' experiences on a central REC reviewing complex multicenter Covid-19 studies, this commentary describes challenges that are inherent to Covid-19 research studies, such as the difficulty of obtaining informed consent from patients ill with the highly infectious virus. The commentary recommends several steps that RECs can take to ensure ethical review of research studies during the Covid-19 pandemic and future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ethics Committees, Research/standards , Ethics, Research , Biomedical Research/ethics , Biomedical Research/standards , Humans , Informed Consent
20.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 33(9): 455-456, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310941
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