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2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0259965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546945

ABSTRACT

As scientific research becomes increasingly cross-disciplinary, many universities seek to support collaborative activity through new buildings and institutions. This study examines the impacts of spatial proximity on collaboration at MIT from 2005 to 2015. By exploiting a shift in the location of researchers due to building renovations, we evaluate how discrete changes in physical proximity affect the likelihood that researchers co-author. The findings suggest that moving researchers into the same building increases their propensity to collaborate, with the effect plateauing five years after the move. The effects are large when compared to the average rate of collaboration among pairs of researchers, which suggests that spatial proximity is an important tool to support cross-disciplinary collaborative science. Furthermore, buildings that host researchers working in the same or related fields and from multiple departments have a larger effect on their propensity to collaborate.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Interdisciplinary Communication , Spatial Behavior , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Facility Design and Construction , Humans , Movement , Research Personnel/psychology , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data
3.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(3): 395-405, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463959

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We analyzed the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19) to understand leading research institutions, collaborations among institutions, major publication venues, key research concepts, and topics covered by pandemic-related research. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive analysis of authors' institutions and relationships, automatic content extraction of key words and phrases from titles and abstracts, and topic modeling and evolution. Data visualization techniques were applied to present the results of the analysis. RESULTS: We found that leading research institutions on COVID-19 included the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the US National Institutes of Health, and the University of California. Research studies mostly involved collaboration among different institutions at national and international levels. In addition to bioRxiv, major publication venues included journals such as The BMJ, PLOS One, Journal of Virology, and The Lancet. Key research concepts included the coronavirus, acute respiratory impairments, health care, and social distancing. The ten most popular topics were identified through topic modeling and included human metapneumovirus and livestock, clinical outcomes of severe patients, and risk factors for higher mortality rate. CONCLUSION: Data analytics is a powerful approach for quickly processing and understanding large-scale datasets like CORD-19. This approach could help medical librarians, researchers, and the public understand important characteristics of COVID-19 research and could be applied to the analysis of other large datasets.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes/statistics & numerical data , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Research Report , Bibliometrics , China , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
7.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8758161, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443675

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Aging is a growing public health concern for people, organizations, and governments. The current study was undertaken to provide insights into the global research output on geriatric nursing. METHODS: A bibliometric study was implemented using the WoS database for the period from 1900 to 2020. Various tools and measures were used to analyze and visualized. RESULTS: The search strategy found 4923 papers. The oldest paper was written by Beverly C. Andre in 1953. As team size increases, so does the number of citations. The USA was the active country and the highest number of coauthors. New York University was an active institution. Stig Karlsson was the most active author in Geriatric Nursing with 28 articles from Sweden, followed by Koen Milisen and Sandman, with 26 articles each from Sweden and Belgium. The most frequent words in this field were depression, malnutrition, education, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. The latest research themes in this field were COVID-19, interprofessional locomotive syndrome, emergency nursing, and public health. The most influential papers were specified. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society was the most active journal. CONCLUSIONS: Geriatric nursing is a rooted field and has received special attention in the last decade. Policymakers, especially in developing countries, should pay attention to geriatric nursing as a specialty of nursing to solve aging issues they would face considering the increasing elderly population.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Geriatric Nursing , Aged , Alzheimer Disease , Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Dementia , Depression , Europe , Geriatric Nursing/trends , Humans , International Cooperation , North America , Serial Publications/statistics & numerical data
8.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256687, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416873

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-associated university closures moved classes online and interrupted ongoing research in universities throughout the US. In Vanderbilt University, first year biomedical sciences PhD students were in the middle of their spring semester coursework and in the process of identifying a thesis research lab, while senior students who had already completed the first year were at various stages of their graduate training and were working on their thesis research projects. To learn how the university closure and resulting interruptions impacted our students' learning and well-being, we administered two surveys, one to the first year students and the other to the senior students. Our main findings show that the university closure negatively impacted the overall psychological health of about one-third of the survey respondents, time management was the aspect of remote learning that caused the highest stress for close to 50% of the students, and interaction with their peers and in-person discussions were the aspects of on-campus learning that students missed the most during the remote learning period. Additionally, survey responses also show that students experienced positive outcomes as a result of remote learning that included spending increased time on additional learning interests, with family, on self-care, and for dissertation or manuscript writing. Though a variety of supportive resources are already available to students in our institution, results from our survey suggest enhancing these measures and identifying new ones targeted to addressing the academic and emotional needs of PhD students would be beneficial. Such support measures may be appropriate for students in other institutions as well.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Education, Graduate/methods , Epidemics/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/standards , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Tennessee , Universities
9.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(3): 329-336, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397994

ABSTRACT

The explosive growth of digital information in recent years has amplified the information overload experienced by today's health-care professionals. In particular, the wide variety of unstructured text makes it difficult for researchers to find meaningful data without spending a considerable amount of time reading. Text mining can be used to facilitate better discoverability and analysis, and aid researchers in identifying critical trends and connections. This column will introduce key text-mining terms, recent use cases of biomedical text mining, and current applications for this technology in medical libraries.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Data Collection/trends , Data Mining/trends , Research Report/trends , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Data Collection/statistics & numerical data , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans
10.
J Occup Health Psychol ; 26(4): 259-260, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397840

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to generate threats to occupational health, safety, and well-being. As a result, it presents an opportunity to deepen the field's insights into occupational health psychology (OHP), and to offer practical guidance that may help workers, organizations, and society mitigate the pandemic's negative effects. This special section of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (JOHP) addresses several implications of the pandemic for well-being and work behavior. The pandemic raises many additional questions deserving of research attention. Such topics include the implications of organizations' evolving workforce and workplace decisions, and work as a mechanism for public health and societal well-being. OHP research also has the potential to generate ideas that may prove useful for addressing future crises. A greater consideration of context may help the field achieve such aims. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Health , Psychology, Industrial , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Psychology, Industrial/organization & administration , Psychology, Industrial/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology
17.
Am J Ophthalmol ; 227: 254-264, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252396

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to characterize clinician-scientists in ophthalmology and identify factors associated with successful research funding, income, and career satisfaction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: A survey was conducted of clinician-scientists in ophthalmology at US academic institutions between April 17, 2019, and May 19, 2019. Collected information including 1) demographic data; 2) amount, type, and source of startup funding; first extramural grant; and first R01-equivalent independent grant; 3) starting and current salaries; and 4) Likert-scale measurements of career satisfaction were analyzed using multivariate regression. RESULTS: Ninety-eight clinician-scientists in ophthalmology were surveyed across different ages (mean: 48 ± 11 years), research categories, institutional types, geographic regions, and academic ranks. Median startup funding ranged from $50-99k, and median starting salaries ranged from $150-199k. A majority of investigators (67%) received their first extramural award from the National Eye Institute, mainly through K-award mechanisms (82%). The median time to receiving their first independent grant was 8 years, mainly through an R01 award (70%). Greater institutional startup support (P = .027) and earlier extramural grant success (P = .022) were associated with earlier independent funding. Male investigators (P = .001) and MD degreed participants (P = .008) were associated with higher current salaries but not starting salaries. Overall career satisfaction increased with career duration (P = .011) but not with earlier independent funding (P = .746) or higher income (P = .300). CONCLUSIONS: Success in research funding by clinician-scientists in ophthalmology may be linked to institutional support and earlier acquisition of extramural grants but does not impact academic salaries. Nevertheless, career satisfaction among clinician-scientists improves with time, which is not necessarily influenced by research or financial success.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Income/statistics & numerical data , Job Satisfaction , Laboratory Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/statistics & numerical data , Research Support as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
18.
Fam Med ; 53(6): 461-466, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Scholarship is recognized as a challenge in many family medicine residency programs. Among evaluations of scholarship curricula, few describe resident experiences of such interventions. To bridge this gap in knowledge, we measured resident confidence, satisfaction, and participation before and after implementing a new scholarship curriculum. METHODS: The redesigned curriculum included a structured project timeline, resident research in progress meetings, faculty mentorship, scholarly skills workshops, and mentored journal clubs. We conducted a curriculum evaluation via surveys of residents prior to implementation and after years 1 and 2, measuring satisfaction with the scholarly environment and opportunities, and confidence and participation in specific scholarly activities using Likert scales from 1 (least confidence) to 5. RESULTS: Compared to baseline (n=28), after 2 years (n=27) of the curriculum, residents reported increased mean confidence in critical appraisal of scientific articles (2.6±1.1 to 3.3±0.7, P=.007), carrying out a scholarly project (2.5±0.8 to 3.4±1.0, P=.005), and writing an abstract (3.0±0.8 to 3.8±0.7, P=.002). As compared to the first year, more residents in the second year participated in quality improvement projects (7.1% vs 29.6%, P=.031) and wrote conference abstracts (10.7% vs 37.0%, P=.022). Over the same period, those very satisfied with the scholarly environment increased from 0 (0%) to 8 (29.6%, P=.017). The June 2020 survey identified increased interest in scholarship because of the antiracism movement (51.9%) and COVID-19 pandemic (40.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a redesigned scholarship curriculum was associated with increases in family medicine resident scholarship confidence and satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Family Practice/education , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Professional Competence , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Program Evaluation
20.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 34(2): 28-36, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240790

ABSTRACT

Quality improvement programs and clinical trial research experienced disruption due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Vascular registries showed an immediate impact with significant declines in second-quarter vascular procedure volumes witnessed across Europe and the United States. To better understand the magnitude and impact of the pandemic, organizations and study groups sent grass roots surveys to vascular specialists for needs assessment. Several vascular registries responded quickly by insertion of COVID-19 variables into their data collection forms. More than 80% of clinical trials have been reported delayed or not started due to factors that included loss of enrollment from patient concerns or mandated institutional shutdowns, weighing the risk of trial participation on patient safety. Preliminary data of patients undergoing vascular surgery with active COVID-19 infection show inferior outcomes (morbidity) and increased mortality. Disease-specific vascular surgery study collaboratives about COVID-19 were created for the desire to study the disease in a more focused manner than possible through registry outcomes. This review describes the pandemic effect on multiple VASCUNET registries including Germany (GermanVasc), Sweden (SwedVasc), United Kingdom (UK National Vascular Registry), Australia and New Zealand (bi-national Australasian Vascular Audit), as well as the United States (Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative). We will highlight the continued collaboration of VASCUNET with the Vascular Quality Initiative in the International Consortium of Vascular Registries as part of the Medical Device Epidemiology Network coordinated registry network. Vascular registries must remain flexible and responsive to new and future real-world problems affecting vascular patients.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Registries , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Quality Improvement
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