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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 846601, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776057

ABSTRACT

Background: Myopia is one of the most common causes of vision impairment in children and adults and has become a public health priority with its growing prevalence worldwide. This study aims to identify and evaluate the global trends in myopia research of the past century and visualize the frontiers using bibliometric analysis. Methods: The literature search was conducted on the Web of Science for myopia studies published between 1900 and 2020. Retrieved publications were analyzed in-depth by the annual publication number, prolific countries and institutions, core author and journal, and the number of citations through descriptive statistics. Collaboration networks and keywords burst were visualized by VOSviewer and CiteSpace. Myopia citation network was visualized using CitNetExplorer. Results: In total, 11,172 publications on myopia were retrieved from 1900 to 2020, with most published by the United States. Saw SM, from the National University of Singapore, contributed the most publications and citations. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science was the journal with highest number of citations. Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery with the maximum number of publications. The top 10 cited papers mainly focused on the epidemiology of myopia. Previous research emphasized myopia-associated experimental animal models, while recent keywords include "SMILE" and "myopia control" with the stronger burst, indicating a shift of concern from etiology to therapy and coincided with the global increment of incidence. Document citation network was clustered into six groups: "prevalence and risk factors of myopia," "surgical control of myopia," "pathogenesis of myopia," "optical interventions of myopia," "myopia and glaucoma," and "pathological myopia." Conclusions: Bibliometrics analysis in this study could help scholars comprehend global trends of myopia research frontiers better. Hundred years of myopia research were clustered into six groups, among which "prevalence and risk factors of myopia" and "surgical control of myopia" were the largest groups. With the increasing prevalence of myopia, interventions of myopia control are a potential research hotspot and pressing public health issue.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Myopia , Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research/trends , Humans , Myopia/epidemiology , Public Health
6.
Circulation ; 144(23): e461-e471, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666518

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had worldwide repercussions for health care and research. In spring 2020, most non-COVID-19 research was halted, hindering research across the spectrum from laboratory-based experimental science to clinical research. Through the second half of 2020 and the first half of 2021, biomedical research, including cardiovascular science, only gradually restarted, with many restrictions on onsite activities, limited clinical research participation, and the challenges associated with working from home and caregiver responsibilities. Compounding these impediments, much of the global biomedical research infrastructure was redirected toward vaccine testing and deployment. This redirection of supply chains, personnel, and equipment has additionally hampered restoration of normal research activity. Transition to virtual interactions offset some of these limitations but did not adequately replace the need for scientific exchange and collaboration. Here, we outline key steps to reinvigorate biomedical research, including a call for increased support from the National Institutes of Health. We also call on academic institutions, publishers, reviewers, and supervisors to consider the impact of COVID-19 when assessing productivity, recognizing that the pandemic did not affect all equally. We identify trainees and junior investigators, especially those with caregiving roles, as most at risk of being lost from the biomedical workforce and identify steps to reduce the loss of these key investigators. Although the global pandemic highlighted the power of biomedical science to define, treat, and protect against threats to human health, significant investment in the biomedical workforce is required to maintain and promote well-being.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Cardiology/trends , Research Design/trends , Research Personnel/trends , Advisory Committees , American Heart Association , Biomedical Research/education , Cardiology/education , Diffusion of Innovation , Education, Professional/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Public Opinion , Research Personnel/education , Time Factors , United States
7.
Int Urol Nephrol ; 54(3): 493-498, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653676

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown had a substantial impact on normal research operations. Researchers needed to adapt their methods to engage at-home participants. One method is crowdsourcing, in which researchers use social media to recruit participants, gather data, and collect samples. We utilized this method to develop a diagnostic test for Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS). Participants were recruited via posts on popular social-media platforms, and enrolled via a website. Participants received and returned a mail kit containing bladder symptom surveys and a urine sample cup containing room-temperature preservative. Using this method, we collected 1254 IC/BPS and control samples in 3 months from all 50 United States. Our data demonstrate that crowdsourcing is a viable alternative to traditional research, with the ability to reach a broad patient population rapidly. Crowdsourcing is a powerful tool for at-home participation in research, particularly during the lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Crowdsourcing/methods , Cystitis, Interstitial , Patient Participation , Urinalysis , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cystitis, Interstitial/diagnosis , Cystitis, Interstitial/epidemiology , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/supply & distribution , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Specimen Handling/methods , United States/epidemiology , Urinalysis/instrumentation , Urinalysis/methods
9.
Gastroenterology ; 161(3): 785-791, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626143

ABSTRACT

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains a major challenge in cancer medicine. Given the increase in incidence and mortality, interdisciplinary research is necessary to translate basic knowledge into therapeutic strategies improving the outcome of patients. On the 4th and 5th of February 2021, three German pancreatic cancer research centers, the Clinical Research Unit 5002 from Göttingen, the Collaborative Research Center 1321 from Munich, and Clinical Research Unit 325 from Marburg organized the 1st Virtual Göttingen-Munich-Marburg Pancreatic Cancer Meeting in order to foster scientific exchange. This report summarizes current research and proceedings presented during that meeting.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Animals , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , COVID-19 , Cell Lineage , Diffusion of Innovation , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics , Pancreatic Neoplasms/mortality , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Tumor Microenvironment , Videoconferencing
10.
Med J Aust ; 216(1): 20-23, 2022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598537
12.
Arch Cardiol Mex ; 91(Suplemento COVID): 001-011, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592861

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has created a landslide of publications, from different sources and unequal impact. We considered that the first 3 months are crucial to understand how knowledge has been generated by performing a bibliometric analysis, including the citations to these articles to guide researchers in exploring this field, and to evaluate the relationship between confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths with the number of papers per country. METHODS: Scientific publications were obtained from PubMed (January-March 2020) and their citations during the first 6 months retrieved from the Scopus database. An analysis of the number of papers by country, approach (type and category of publication), and impact was made. A multiple linear regression model was implemented to analyze the correlation between the number of publications and confirmed cases and deaths. RESULTS: A total of 2,530 publications were analyzed with 59,104 citations (23.4 citations/article), written by authors from 67 countries. China was the country with more publications (988, 39%) and more citations (36,416, 63%) followed by the United States with 423 articles (16.7%) and 7,458 citations (12.6%). The coauthorship network identified 10,756 authors. According to the multivariate analysis, both confirmed cases and deaths were significantly correlated with the number of publications per country (corrected by population size and gross domestic product). CONCLUSION: The correlation with the number of publications suggests that cases and deaths had some impact on the medical literature, reflecting how rapidly the scientific community has been on the frontline in the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Biomedical Research/trends , China , Databases, Factual , Humans , Pandemics , Publications/statistics & numerical data , United States
13.
J Clin Invest ; 131(24)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573960

ABSTRACT

In this editorial, we describe the experience of the JCI editors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our goal is to share how we operated during the pandemic, recount how the JCI contributed to the response, highlight some of the major papers we published on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, and impart our insights in the hope that these are helpful to journal editors that may need to deal with similar types of crises in the future.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Publications , SARS-CoV-2 , China/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , Pandemics , Public Health , Quarantine , Social Isolation , United States/epidemiology
16.
Gastroenterology ; 161(6): 1758-1763, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541265
19.
Cardiovasc Res ; 117(9): 2045-2053, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526155

ABSTRACT

Although coronavirus disease 2019 seems to be the leading topic in research number of outstanding studies have been published in the field of aorta and peripheral vascular diseases likely affecting our clinical practice in the near future. This review article highlights key research on vascular diseases published in 2020. Some studies have shed light in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm and dissection suggesting a potential role for kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic options. A first proteogenomic study on fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) revealed a promising novel disease gene and provided proof-of-concept for a protein/lipid-based FMD blood test. The role of NADPH oxidases in vascular physiology, and particularly endothelial cell differentiation, is highlighted with potential for cell therapy development. Imaging of vulnerable plaque has been an intense field of research. Features of plaque vulnerability on magnetic resonance imaging as an under-recognized cause of stroke are discussed. Major clinical trials on lower extremity peripheral artery disease have shown added benefit of dual antithrombotic (aspirin plus rivaroxaban) treatment.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases , Biomedical Research/trends , Peripheral Vascular Diseases , Animals , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , Aortic Diseases/genetics , Aortic Diseases/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/genetics , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/therapy , Prognosis
20.
BMJ ; 375: n2736, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511459
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