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2.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 42(Suppl 1): S8-S12, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784405

ABSTRACT

The past decade has seen a shift in health care delivery models to be more value-based: patient-centered, accessible, and cost-effective. One of the primary modes of addressing these needs has been through the implementation of telemedicine-digital health care technology that streamlines and enhances traditional health care delivery. In the orthopaedic setting, there are various methods of telemedicine utilization, each uniquely optimized for different clinical scenarios. There are certain financial and technological limitations when utilizing telemedicine for orthopaedic care that pose notable barriers to uniform utilization across the specialty. Nonetheless, these challenges are currently being tested as orthopaedic surgeons continuously become more innovative and creative as to how they deliver care. As we enter our "new normal" in the post-COVID-19 era, the availability and use of telemedicine will equip orthopaedic surgeons to deliver high-quality, affordable, and accessible care in an ever-changing health care landscape.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Telemedicine , Biomedical Technology , Humans , Patient Care
3.
Saúde Soc ; 31(1): e201010, 2022. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1779819

ABSTRACT

Resumo As rigorosas medidas de segurança adotadas pelos hospitais, em decorrência da pandemia, estenderam-se também às Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatais (UTIN). Este artigo desvela, por meio de observação sistemática, as mudanças organizacionais e estruturais ancoradas na Teoria Ambientalista de Nightingale que ocorreram na UTIN de um hospital público do interior da Bahia. Observou-se a interconexão entre os Ambientes Físico, Psicológico e Social, porém, com comprometimento na comunicação e relação entre família, neonato e equipe, apresentando um viés sensível das consequências restritivas da covid-19. Salienta-se o paradoxo entre zelar pela segurança e o impedimento das práticas informativas e facilitadoras de vínculos que envolvem o trinômio mencionado. Contudo, novas estratégias emergem desse contexto, levando os profissionais a se reinventarem e ousarem na comunicação, por meio de recursos remotos antes não utilizados, destacando as tecnologias digitais.


Abstract The strict safety measures adopted in hospital environments due to the pandemic have also been extended to Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). By means of a systematic observation and based on Nightingale's Environmental Theory, this article sought to unveil the organizational and structural changes in the NICU of a public hospital in the countryside of Bahia. Results indicate an interconnection between physical, psychological, and social environments, which were committed to the communication and relationship between family, newborn, and team, thus presenting a sensitive bias of the restrictive consequences of covid-19. These findings highlight the paradox between ensuring security and preventing informational and bond-facilitator practices that involve the aforementioned triad. From this context emerge new communication strategies leading professionals to reinvent themselves, and to dare in communication by remote resources not used before, emphasizing the use of digital technologies.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant, Newborn , Family , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Communication , Biomedical Technology
4.
IEEE Pulse ; 13(1): 2-7, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769662

ABSTRACT

Biomedical and health technology is progressing at breakneck speed. From specialty pharmacies to general discount shops, store shelves are packed with a vast assortment of wearable medical devices that measure glucose levels, heart rate, and other health metrics; and over-the-counter test kits are helping to check for a wide array of infections. At the same time, electronic health records and other data-sharing platforms have smoothed the mass shift from in-person to virtual office visits over the past two years, and new imaging technologies are allowing earlier disease detection so treatments can begin sooner when they are more effective.


Subject(s)
Wearable Electronic Devices , Biomedical Technology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e26515, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has required widespread and rapid adoption of information and communications technology (ICT) platforms by health professionals. Transitioning health programs from face-to-face to remote delivery using ICT platforms has introduced new challenges. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to scope for ICT-delivered health programs implemented within the community health setting in high-income countries and rapidly disseminate findings to health professionals. METHODS: The Joanna Briggs Institute's scoping review methodology guided the review of the literature. RESULTS: The search retrieved 7110 unique citations. Each title and abstract was screened by at least two reviewers, resulting in 399 citations for full-text review. Of these 399 citations, 72 (18%) were included. An additional 27 citations were identified through reviewing the reference lists of the included studies, resulting in 99 citations. Citations examined 83 ICT-delivered programs from 19 high-income countries. Variations in program design, ICT platforms, research design, and outcomes were evident. CONCLUSIONS: Included programs and research were heterogeneous, addressing prevalent chronic diseases. Evidence was retrieved for the effectiveness of nurse and allied health ICT-delivered programs. Findings indicated that outcomes for participants receiving ICT-delivered programs, when compared with participants receiving in-person programs, were either equivalent or better. Gaps included a paucity of co-designed programs, qualitative research around group programs, programs for patients and carers, and evaluation of cost-effectiveness. During COVID-19 and beyond, health professionals in the community health setting are encouraged to build on existing knowledge and address evidence gaps by developing and evaluating innovative ICT-delivered programs in collaboration with consumers and carers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Biomedical Technology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Developed Countries , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264436, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700564

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine is a rapidly expanding field of medicine and an alternative method for delivering quality medical care to patients' fingertips. With the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in the use of telemedicine to connect patients and healthcare providers, which has been made possible by mobile health (mHealth) applications. The goal of this study was to compare the satisfaction of patients with telemedicine among mHealth users and non-users. This was a survey-based study that included outpatients from Abu Dhabi. The association between patient satisfaction with telemedicine and use of mHealth technologies was described using regression models. This study included a total of 515 completed responses. The use of mHealth application was significantly associated with ease of booking telemedicine appointments (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.63-4.18; P < .001), perception of similarity of quality of care between telemedicine consultations and in-person visits (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.26-2.61; P = .001), and preference for using telemedicine applications over in-person visits during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.12-2.72; P = .015). Our study results support that the use of mHealth applications is associated with increased patient satisfaction with telemedicine appointments.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications/trends , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomedical Technology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
7.
Can J Cardiol ; 38(2): 279-291, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604002

ABSTRACT

While COVID-19 is still ongoing and associated with more than 5 million deaths, the scope and speed of advances over the past year in terms of scientific discovery, data dissemination, and technology have been staggering. It is not a matter of "if" but "when" we will face the next pandemic, and how we leverage technology and data management effectively to create flexible ecosystems that facilitate collaboration, equitable care, and innovation will determine its severity and scale. The aim of this review is to address emerging challenges that came to light during the pandemic in health care and innovations that enabled us to adapt and continue to care for patients. The pandemic highlighted the need for seismic shifts in care paradigms and technology with considerations related to the digital divide and health literacy for digital health interventions to reach full potential and improve health outcomes. We discuss advances in telemedicine, remote patient monitoring, and emerging wearable technologies. Despite the promise of digital health, we emphasise the importance of addressing its limitations, including interpretation challenges, accuracy of findings, and artificial intelligence-driven algorithms. We summarise the most recent recommendation of the Virtual Care Task Force to scaling virtual medical services in Canada. Finally, we propose a model for optimal implementation of health digital innovations with 5 tenets including data management, data security, digital biomarkers, useful artificial intelligence, and clinical integration.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology , Civil Defense/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Artificial Intelligence , Biomedical Technology/standards , Biomedical Technology/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Digital Technology , Humans , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Diabet Med ; 39(4): e14755, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid implementation of remote care delivery in type 1 diabetes. We studied current modes of care delivery, healthcare professional experiences and impact on insulin pump training in type 1 diabetes care in the United Kingdom (UK). METHODS: The UK Diabetes Technology Network designed a 48-question survey aimed at healthcare professionals providing care in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-three healthcare professionals (48% diabetes physicians, 52% diabetes educators and 88% working in adult services) from approximately 75 UK centres (52% university hospitals, 46% general and community hospitals), responded to the survey. Telephone consultations were the main modality of care delivery. There was a higher reported time taken for video consultations versus telephone (p < 0.001). Common barriers to remote consultations were patient familiarity with technology (72%) and access to patient device data (67%). We assessed the impact on insulin pump training. A reduction in total new pump starts (73%) and renewals (61%) was highlighted. Common barriers included patient digital literacy (61%), limited healthcare professional experience (46%) and time required per patient (44%). When grouped according to size of insulin pump service, pump starts and renewals in larger services were less impacted by the pandemic compared to smaller services. CONCLUSION: This survey highlights UK healthcare professional experiences of remote care delivery. While supportive of virtual care models, a number of factors highlighted, especially patient digital literacy, need to be addressed to improve virtual care delivery and device training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Health Personnel , Self-Management/education , Telemedicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Biomedical Technology/education , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/instrumentation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Glycemic Control/instrumentation , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Insulin Infusion Systems , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Patient Education as Topic/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Self-Management/methods , Self-Management/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
10.
Cien Saude Colet ; 26(11): 5589-5598, 2021 Nov.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547039

ABSTRACT

The 16th National Health Conference illustrated the interest of health councils to intervene in public policies in order to guarantee the right to health technologies. The INTEGRA project (Integration of policies for Health Surveillance, Pharmaceutical Care, Science, Technology, and Innovation in Health) is a partnership among the National Health Council, the National School of Pharmacists, and the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), with support from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), with the goal of strengthening participation and social engagement in the theme, as well as the integration of health policies and practices within different sectors of society (social movements, health councils, and health professionals), with the various stages related to the access to medicines (research, incorporation, national production, and services) being the main theme in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It seeks to offer training for leadership groups in the health regions and activities with a broad national and political scope, and it hopes to establish an intersectorial and integrated network of leaders capable of acting collaboratively to defend the development of science, public policies, national sovereignty, and social control of health.


A 16ª Conferência Nacional de Saúde demonstrou o interesse do controle social em intervir sobre as políticas públicas a fim de garantir o direito às tecnologias de saúde. O projeto Integra - Integração das Políticas de Vigilância em Saúde, Assistência Farmacêutica, Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação em Saúde -, nasce da parceria entre o Conselho Nacional de Saúde, a Escola Nacional dos Farmacêuticos e a Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), com apoio da Organização Pan-Americana de Saúde (OPAS) com objetivo de fortalecimento da participação e engajamento social na temática e a integração das políticas e práticas de saúde em diferentes setores da sociedade (movimentos sociais, controle social e profissionais de saúde), tendo as diversas etapas relacionadas ao acesso aos medicamentos (pesquisa, incorporação, produção nacional e serviços) como mote principal, no cenário da pandemia de COVID-19. Oferta-se, neste projeto, capacitação para grupos de lideranças nas regiões de saúde e atividades de grande abrangência nacional e política. Espera-se alcançar o estabelecimento de uma rede intersetorial, integrada de lideranças capazes de atuar colaborativamente para a defesa do desenvolvimento da ciência, das políticas públicas, da soberania nacional e do controle social da saúde.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Participation , Biomedical Technology , Health Policy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e051812, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462967

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent and type of data redaction in all active technology appraisals (TA) and highly specialised technology (HST) evaluations issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) from its conception of the institute to September 2019. To propose policy recommendations for transparency. METHODS: Structured audit to establish extent of data redaction-proportion of appraisals and specific data categories and assess redaction by: indication, appraisal process, manufacturer, type of data-price, adverse events (AEs), clinical (excluding AEs), incremental quality-adjusted life-years. Longitudinal analysis over 20 years. RESULTS: All TAs with available documentation and active recommendations (n=408) and HSTs (n=10) published from March 2000 to 11 September 2019 have been assessed for data redaction. Overall, 333 TAs (81.6%) have data redaction, 86 (25.8%) of them are heavily redacted. Clinical data (excluding AEs) are redacted in 268 (65.7%) appraisals, AE data in 128 (31.4%), price in 238 (58.3%). In total, 87% of oncology appraisals have redacted data vs 78% of non-oncology appraisals. 91% of single TAs have redacted data vs 59% of multiple TAs. 25% of final guidance documents (e.g. Final Appraisal Determination - FAD) do not report one or more instance of clinical data. Data redaction increased substantially over time, and is currently at its highest level with 100% of TAs having at least some data redaction in 2019/2020, 96% of appraisals in 2018/2019% and 94% of appraisals in 2017/2018. All 10 HST evaluations have redacted data, with 4 of them being heavily redacted. CONCLUSIONS: Documents supporting NICE TA and HST recommendations are significantly redacted, thereby concealing clinical and economic data of importance to patients, clinicians and researchers. Documents remain redacted on the NICE website for years. Policy change is required to ensure transparency of data underpinning NICE's decisions.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology , Technology Assessment, Biomedical , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Policy , United Kingdom
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(9): e28766, 2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443964

ABSTRACT

Despite recent and potent technological advances, the real-world implementation of remote digital health technology in the care and monitoring of patients with motor neuron disease has not yet been realized. Digital health technology may increase the accessibility to and personalization of care, whereas remote biosensors could optimize the collection of vital clinical parameters, irrespective of patients' ability to visit the clinic. To facilitate the wide-scale adoption of digital health care technology and to align current initiatives, we outline a road map that will identify clinically relevant digital parameters; mediate the development of benefit-to-burden criteria for innovative technology; and direct the validation, harmonization, and adoption of digital health care technology in real-world settings. We define two key end products of the road map: (1) a set of reliable digital parameters to capture data collected under free-living conditions that reflect patient-centric measures and facilitate clinical decision making and (2) an integrated, open-source system that provides personalized feedback to patients, health care providers, clinical researchers, and caregivers and is linked to a flexible and adaptable platform that integrates patient data in real time. Given the ever-changing care needs of patients and the relentless progression rate of motor neuron disease, the adoption of digital health care technology will significantly benefit the delivery of care and accelerate the development of effective treatments.


Subject(s)
Motor Neuron Disease , Biomedical Technology , Caregivers , Health Personnel , Humans , Motor Neuron Disease/diagnosis , Motor Neuron Disease/therapy , Technology
13.
Biochem Cell Biol ; 99(6): 766-771, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440839

ABSTRACT

Cell-free synthetic biology is a rapidly developing biotechnology with the potential to solve the world's biggest problems; however, this promise also has implications for global biosecurity and biosafety. Given the current situation of COVID-19 and its economic impact, capitalizing on the potential of cell-free synthetic biology from an economic, biosafety, and biosecurity perspective contributes to our preparedness for the next pandemic, and urges the development of appropriate policies and regulations, together with the necessary mitigation technologies. Proactive involvement from scientists is necessary to avoid misconceptions and assist in the policymaking process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Synthetic Biology/economics , Synthetic Biology/legislation & jurisprudence , Biocompatible Materials , Biomedical Technology , Biotechnology , Cell-Free System , Diffusion of Innovation , Health Policy , Humans , Safety , Synthetic Biology/trends
15.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 26-37, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392944

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) is currently spreading exponentially around the globe. Various digital health technologies are currently being used as weapons in the fight against the pandemic in different ways by countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the role of digital health technologies in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and address the gaps in the use of these technologies for tackling the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a scoping review guided by the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines. The articles were searched using electronic databases including MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane Library, and Hinari. In addition, Google and Google scholar were searched. Studies that focused on the application of digital health technologies on COVID-19 prevention and control were included in the review. We characterized the distribution of technological applications based on geographical locations, approaches to apply digital health technologies and main findings. The study findings from the existing literature were presented using thematic content analysis. RESULTS: A total of 2,601 potentially relevant studies were generated from the initial search and 22 studies were included in the final review. The review found that telemedicine was used most frequently, followed by electronic health records and other digital technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, and the internet of things (IoT). Digital health technologies were used in multiple ways in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including screening and management of patients, methods to minimize exposure, modelling of disease spread, and supporting overworked providers. CONCLUSION: Digital health technologies like telehealth, mHealth, electronic medical records, artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and big data/internet were used in different ways for the prevention and control of the COVID-19 pandemic in different settings using multiple approaches. For more effective deployment of digital health tools in times of pandemics, development of a guiding policy and standard on the development, deployment, and use of digital health tools in response to a pandemic is recommended.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Information Management , Medical Informatics Applications , Artificial Intelligence , Telemedicine
18.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(9): e0007956, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339406

ABSTRACT

In 2018, the government of the Republic of Korea (ROK), South Korean life science companies, and a group of international funders led by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched a new and innovative funding agency to support neglected-disease research and development (R&D). The new venture is known as the Research Investment for Global Health Technology (RIGHT) Fund.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology/economics , Neglected Diseases/prevention & control , Biomedical Technology/organization & administration , Biomedical Technology/trends , Financial Management , Global Health/economics , Humans , Neglected Diseases/economics , Neglected Diseases/epidemiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
19.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 82(7): 1-4, 2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337826

ABSTRACT

The NHS has always struggled to effectively adopt innovative medical technologies. A report by The Medical Technology Group argues that a new system for the widespread adoption of technology is needed. The report argues that, considering the growing backlog of procedures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, medical technology can increase efficiency and deliver better outcomes for patients, while helping the NHS to recover.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Industry/organization & administration , Efficiency, Organizational , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Health Care , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Systems Integration
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