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2.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 60(4): 103207, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336983

ABSTRACT

Blood transfusions come with risks and high costs, and should be utilized only when clinically indicated. Decisions to transfuse are however not always well informed, and lack of clinician knowledge and education on good clinical transfusion practices contribute to the inappropriate use of blood. Low and middle-income countries in particular take much strain in their efforts to address blood safety challenges, demand-supply imbalances, high blood costs as well as high disease burdens, all of which impact blood usage and blood collections. Patient blood management (PBM), which is a patient-focused approach aimed at improving patient outcomes by preemptively diagnosing and correcting anaemia and limiting blood loss by cell salvage, coagulation optimization and other measures, has become a major approach to addressing many of the challenges mentioned. The associated decrease in the use of blood and blood products may be perceived as being in competition with blood conservation measures, which is the more traditional, but primarily product-focused approach. In this article, we hope to convey the message that PBM and blood conservation should not be seen as competing concepts, but rather complimentary strategies with the common goal of improving patient care. This offers opportunity to improve the culture of transfusion practices with relief to blood establishments and clinical services, not only in South Africa and LMICs, but everywhere. With the COVID-19 pandemic impacting blood supplies worldwide, this is an ideal time to call for educational interventions and awareness as an active strategy to improve transfusion practices, immediately and beyond.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Transfusion , Bloodless Medical and Surgical Procedures , Anemia/therapy , Blood Banks/economics , Blood Loss, Surgical , Blood Safety , Blood Transfusion/economics , Blood-Borne Infections/prevention & control , Bloodless Medical and Surgical Procedures/economics , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Developing Countries , Donor Selection/economics , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Postpartum Hemorrhage/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Prevalence , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology , Transfusion Medicine/education
3.
Vox Sang ; 116(5): 497-503, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241034

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Numerous concerns regarding maintenance of blood inventory have been raised after SARS-CoV-2 pandemic outbreak. These concerns were based on the experience of blood centres in previous pandemics where shortage of blood components was reported. The present study had tried to understand the impact of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on blood collection and demand as well as the impact of disaster planning in maintaining an adequate inventory. METHODS: Data related to blood supply and demand were collected retrospectively using blood bank management software for pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 time period and compared. Strategies adopted and effects of changes in existing disaster plans to maintain an adequate inventory were studied. RESULTS: A drastic fall in the red cell inventory was observed as compared to pre-COVID-19 time period was observed due to disproportionate decrease in blood collection (1/6 to 1/9 of the previous collection) and demand (1/2 of the previous demand). The buffer stock fell gradually over a period of three weeks with cancellation of planned blood donation drives. A buffer stock equivalent to 2-week inventory led to adequate inventory in the initial lockdown periods. Similar fall was observed in the platelet inventory with reduction in the blood collection but almost a proportionate reduction in the platelet demand led to adequate inventory. No increase in wastage was observed for both red cells and platelets during this period. DISCUSSION: A buffer stock of blood and blood components, strict adherence to the transfusion triggers, good coordination with the clinical staff and a prospective review of blood transfusion requests to ensure rational blood transfusion were some of the steps which helped us to successfully maintain transfusion requirements in the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. Use of first-in-first-out policy prevented any wastage due to outdating of blood.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Safety/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Banks/standards , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Safety/methods , Hospitals/standards , Humans
4.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 60(4): 103154, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230803

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convalescent plasma (CP) has been used in the past in various pandemics, in particular in H1N1, SARS and MERS infections. In Spring 2020, when ongoing the SARS-CoV-2 pandemics, the Veneto Region (V-R) has proposed setting-up an anti-SARS-CoV-2 CP (CCP) Bank, with the aim of preparing a supply of CCP immediately available in case of subsequest epidemic waves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Key-points to be developed for a quick set-up of the V-R CCP Bank have been recruitment of donors recovered from COVID-19 infection, laboratory analysis for the biological qualification of the CCP units, including titre of neutralizing antibodies and reduction of pathogens, according to National Blood Centre (CNS) Directives, adaptation of the V-R Information Technology systems and cost analysis. Some activities, including diagnostic and viral inactivation processes, have been centralized in 2 or 3 sites. Laboratory analysis upon preliminary admission of the donor included all tests required by the Italian laws and the CNS directives. RESULTS: From April to August 2020, 3,298 people have contacted the V-R Blood Transfusion Services: of these, 1,632 have been evaluated and examined as first time donors and those found to be suitable have carried out 955 donations, from which 2,626 therapeutic fractions have been obtained, at a cost around 215,00 Euro. Since October 2020, the number of COVID-19 inpatients has had a surge with a heavy hospital overload. Moreover, the high request of CCP therapy by clinicians has been just as unexpected, showing a wide therapeutic use. CONCLUSIONS: The organizational model here presented, which has allowed the rapid collection of a large amount of CCP, could be useful when facing new pandemic outbreaks, especially in low and middle income countries, with generally acceptable costs.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Pandemics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blood Banks/economics , Blood Donors , Blood Safety/methods , Blood-Borne Infections/prevention & control , Costs and Cost Analysis , Donor Selection/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Immunization, Passive/statistics & numerical data , Italy , Models, Organizational , Plasma , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Inactivation
5.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 60(3): 103131, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185295

ABSTRACT

India has almost 3,000 blood centres collecting more than 11 million units annually. Maintaining blood supply during the COVID-19 pandemic is a huge challenge. We conducted a cross-sectional study by an online survey to analyse the variation of practices across blood centers of India during this pandemic. A total of 196 blood centers completely responded to the online survey. Most of the blood centres who responded were part of Government hospitals (60 %), part of an academic institutes (55.6 %) and were directly supporting a COVID hospital (67.5 %). Almost 95.4 % blood centers reported reduction of blood donation mainly due to lockdown (50 %) and inability to conduct camps (17.3 %). Scheduling blood donations was one of the most difficult to implement strategy for maintaining adequate blood donation (40.2 %). Blood center manpower management was also a challenge and upto 48 % blood centers operated in two batches to ensure social distancing in blood banks and reduce the risk of exposure. Hemato-oncology (36.8 %) and obstetrics (33.7 %) were major utilizer of blood during the pandemic. There were marked variations in use of PPE by blood banks staff as well as strategies adopted while conducting immunohematology tests on COVID-19 positive patients samples. This pandemic has highlighted some of the major limitations of the health services but blood services have risen to the challenge and strived to maintain the blood supply chain while ensuring blood donor and staff safety. The wide variations in the practices adopted highlights the need for uniform guidelines for blood services in future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Vox Sang ; 116(3): 296-304, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: While coronavirus (COVID-19) is not transfusion-transmitted, the impact of the global pandemic on blood services worldwide is complex. Convalescent plasma may offer treatment, but efficacy and safety are not established. Measuring seroprevalence in donors would inform public health policy. Here, we survey blood services around the world to assess the different research programmes related to COVID-19 planned or in progress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood collection services were surveyed in June 2020 to determine whether they were participating in serosurveys or convalescent plasma collection and clinical trials. RESULTS: A total of 48 countries (77% of those contacted) responded. Seroprevalence studies are planned or in progress in 73% of countries surveyed and in all continents, including low- and middle-income countries. Most aimed to inform public health policy. Convalescent plasma programmes have been initiated around the globe (79% of surveyed), about three quarters as clinical trials in high-, middle- and low-income countries. CONCLUSION: Blood services around the world have drawn upon their operational capacity to provide much-needed seroprevalence data to inform public health. They have rapidly implemented preparation of potential treatment when few treatments are available and mostly as clinical trials. At the same time, they must continue to provide blood products for recipients despite challenges of working in a state of emergency. It is important to track and coordinate research efforts across jurisdictions to gain a composite evidence-based view that will influence future practice and preparative strategies.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Safety , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Blood Donors , COVID-19/prevention & control , Geography , Health Policy , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Pandemics , Phlebotomy , Public Health , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Transfusion ; 61(6): 1822-1829, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105380

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditionally, during crises the number of new blood donors increases. However, the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created additional barriers to donate due to governmental prevention measures and increased personal health risks. In this report, we examined how the pandemic affected new donor registrations in the Netherlands, especially among groups with higher risk profiles for severe COVID-19. Additionally, we explored the role of media for blood donation and new donor registrations. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed new donor registrations and attention for blood donation in newspapers and on social media from January until May 2020, in comparison to the same period in 2017 to 2019. RESULTS: After the introduction of nationwide prevention measures, several peaks in new donor registrations occurred, which coincided with peaks in media attention. Interestingly, people with a higher risk profile for COVID-19 (e.g., due to age or region of residence) were overrepresented among new registrants. DISCUSSION: In sum, the first peak of the current pandemic has led to increased new blood donor registrations, despite the associated increased health risks. Time and future studies will have to tell whether these new donors are one-off 'pandemic' donors or if they will become regular, loyal donors.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19 , Donor Selection , Adolescent , Adult , Advertising , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Banks/standards , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/psychology , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Blood Safety/methods , Blood Safety/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Donor Selection/methods , Donor Selection/organization & administration , Donor Selection/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Records/standards , Middle Aged , Motivation , Netherlands/epidemiology , Newspapers as Topic , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Social Media , Young Adult
9.
Blood Transfus ; 19(2): 158-167, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is placing blood and tissue establishments under unprecedented stress, putting its capacity to provide the adequate care needed at risk. Here we reflect on how our integrated organisational model has faced the first impact of the pandemic and describe what challenges, opportunities and lessons have emerged. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The organisational model of the Catalan Blood and Tissue Bank (Banc de Sang i Teixits, BST) is described. The new scenario was managed by following international recommendations and considering the pandemic in a context of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA), allowing rapid measures to be taken. These aimed to: ensure donor safety, promote proper responses to patients' needs, ensure the health and well-being of personnel, and prepare for future scenarios. RESULTS: The BST has adapted its activities to the changes in demand. No shortage of any product or service occurred. Donor acceptance, safety and wellbeing were maintained except for tissue donation, which almost completely stopped. To support the health system, several activities have been promoted: large-scale convalescent plasma (CP) production, clinical trials with CP and mesenchymal stromal cells, massive COVID-19 diagnoses, and participation in co-operative research and publications. Haemovigilance is running smoothly and no adverse effects have been detected among donors or patients. DISCUSSION: Several elements have proven to be critical when addressing the pandemic scenario: a) the early creation of a crisis committee in combination with technical recommendations and the recognition of a VUCA scenario; b) identification of the strategies described; c) the integrated donor-to-patient organisational model; d) active Research and Development (R&D); and e) the flexibility of the staff. It is essential to underline the importance of the need for centralised management, effective contingency strategies, and early collaboration with peers.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Banks/organization & administration , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors , Bone Marrow Transplantation , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Models, Organizational , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Safety , Spain , Tissue and Organ Procurement
10.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(1): 16-24, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spurred a global health crisis. The safety and supply of blood during this pandemic has been a concern of blood banks and transfusion services as it is expected to adversely affect blood system activities. We aim to assess the situation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) during the first months of the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey was designed to address blood supply, transfusion demand, and donor management during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Medical directors of different blood banks were invited to participate. RESULTS: A total of 16 centers participated with representation from 15/19 countries in the region. In total, 75% were from national blood banks. Most centres had a decrease in the blood supply, ranging from 26-50%. Representatives from 14 countries (93.3%) believed that public fear has contributed to a decrease in donations. Most centres (n=12, 75%) had a reduction in transfusion demand, while those who did not, reported heavy involvement in treating patients with underlying haemoglobinopathies and haematological malignancies. Half of the centres activated their contingency plans. Four centres had to alter the blood donor eligibility criteria to meet demands. All centres implemented donor deferral criteria in relation to SARS-CoV-2, but were variable in measures to mitigate the risk of donor and staff exposure. CONCLUSION: Blood services in the region faced variable degrees of blood shortages. We summarize lessons learnt during this pandemic for the blood banks to consider to plan, assess, and respond proportionately to future similar pandemics.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Africa, Northern , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Donor Selection/standards , Health Care Surveys , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Hemoglobinopathies/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Mediterranean Region , Middle East , Pakistan , Professional-Patient Relations
12.
Ciênc. Saúde Colet ; 25(12): 4969-4978, Dec. 2020. tab
Article in English, Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-961485

ABSTRACT

Resumo O artigo tem por objetivo discutir as consequências das medidas de distanciamento social sobre a disponibilidade de sangue e a organização dos serviços hemoterápicos no início da pandemia de Covid-19 no Brasil. A partir do acesso às notícias publicadas no mês de abril de 2020 nos sites das Hemorredes estaduais do país e organizadas em matriz Excel, foram elaborados quadros-síntese e descrição de resultados. A situação crítica de abastecimento de sangue, em especial para alguns tipos sanguíneos, foi constatada em muitos estados, devido à circulação do novo coronavírus. A adoção de medidas de distanciamento social e a manutenção das demandas por transfusão para tratamentos, urgência e emergência, requereram a implantação e a implementação de estratégias e ações para reorganização dos serviços. Medidas de proteção foram incorporadas, fluxos alterados e rotinas estabelecidas. Este estudo evidencia o quanto a situação epidemiológica da Covid-19 e as medidas necessárias para o seu controle influenciaram sobre a situação dos estoques e disponibilidade de sangue, e, demandaram, mudanças na organização dos serviços hemoterápicos a fim de assegurar a proteção, mitigar os riscos de propagação do vírus e garantir o suprimento de sangue para o atendimento às necessidades do sistema de saúde.


Abstract The article aims to discuss the consequences of social distancing measures on the availability of blood and organization of blood therapy services at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic in Brazil. News published in April 2020 on the websites of the country's state Blood Service Networks were consulted and organized in an Excel spreadsheet, presented in summary charts, and descriptions of results were prepared. A critical situation of blood supply, especially of some blood types, has been observed in many states. This situation is influenced by the circulation of the new coronavirus. The adoption of social distancing measures associated with unchanged transfusion demands for outpatient, urgency and emergency care required the implementation of strategies and actions for the reorganization of the services. Protection measures were incorporated, flows were changed and new routines were established. This study shows the extent to which the epidemiological situation of Covid-19 and the necessary measures for its control influenced the stocks and availability of blood. Changes in the organization of blood therapy services were fundamental in order to ensure protection, mitigate the risks of spreading the virus, and ensure the blood supply to meet the needs of the health system.


Subject(s)
Personal Space , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Hematology/organization & administration , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Brazil/epidemiology , Internet
14.
Vox Sang ; 116(3): 296-304, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: While coronavirus (COVID-19) is not transfusion-transmitted, the impact of the global pandemic on blood services worldwide is complex. Convalescent plasma may offer treatment, but efficacy and safety are not established. Measuring seroprevalence in donors would inform public health policy. Here, we survey blood services around the world to assess the different research programmes related to COVID-19 planned or in progress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood collection services were surveyed in June 2020 to determine whether they were participating in serosurveys or convalescent plasma collection and clinical trials. RESULTS: A total of 48 countries (77% of those contacted) responded. Seroprevalence studies are planned or in progress in 73% of countries surveyed and in all continents, including low- and middle-income countries. Most aimed to inform public health policy. Convalescent plasma programmes have been initiated around the globe (79% of surveyed), about three quarters as clinical trials in high-, middle- and low-income countries. CONCLUSION: Blood services around the world have drawn upon their operational capacity to provide much-needed seroprevalence data to inform public health. They have rapidly implemented preparation of potential treatment when few treatments are available and mostly as clinical trials. At the same time, they must continue to provide blood products for recipients despite challenges of working in a state of emergency. It is important to track and coordinate research efforts across jurisdictions to gain a composite evidence-based view that will influence future practice and preparative strategies.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Safety , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Blood Donors , COVID-19/prevention & control , Geography , Health Policy , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Pandemics , Phlebotomy , Public Health , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Vox Sang ; 116(5): 497-503, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889823

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Numerous concerns regarding maintenance of blood inventory have been raised after SARS-CoV-2 pandemic outbreak. These concerns were based on the experience of blood centres in previous pandemics where shortage of blood components was reported. The present study had tried to understand the impact of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on blood collection and demand as well as the impact of disaster planning in maintaining an adequate inventory. METHODS: Data related to blood supply and demand were collected retrospectively using blood bank management software for pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 time period and compared. Strategies adopted and effects of changes in existing disaster plans to maintain an adequate inventory were studied. RESULTS: A drastic fall in the red cell inventory was observed as compared to pre-COVID-19 time period was observed due to disproportionate decrease in blood collection (1/6 to 1/9 of the previous collection) and demand (1/2 of the previous demand). The buffer stock fell gradually over a period of three weeks with cancellation of planned blood donation drives. A buffer stock equivalent to 2-week inventory led to adequate inventory in the initial lockdown periods. Similar fall was observed in the platelet inventory with reduction in the blood collection but almost a proportionate reduction in the platelet demand led to adequate inventory. No increase in wastage was observed for both red cells and platelets during this period. DISCUSSION: A buffer stock of blood and blood components, strict adherence to the transfusion triggers, good coordination with the clinical staff and a prospective review of blood transfusion requests to ensure rational blood transfusion were some of the steps which helped us to successfully maintain transfusion requirements in the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. Use of first-in-first-out policy prevented any wastage due to outdating of blood.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Safety/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Banks/standards , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Safety/methods , Hospitals/standards , Humans
16.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 151(3): 424-430, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on the frequency of blood donation (BD) in a Latin American hospital and how the social isolation policy implemented during the pandemic jeopardizes the quality of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) care due to shortages at blood banks (BB). METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted, lasting for 31 months, including the start of the pandemic. Frequency of BD and the use of obstetric emergency services was observed. RESULTS: A direct relationship was observed between the pandemic and a decrease in BD. Although emergency obstetric visits decreased, the frequency of deliveries and cases of PPH remained unchanged. After applying strategies to promote voluntary BD, a very slight increase was observed in the frequency of BD, with a negative indicator persisting between donation and blood demand. CONCLUSION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has led to shortages at BBs. In this context, typical measures to encourage an altruistic attitude toward BD have not had a significant impact. As causes of PPH continue, quality of care may be affected by the current situation at BBs. Governments and institutions must implement new strategies to motivate BD.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Blood Donors/psychology , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Postpartum Hemorrhage/therapy , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies
17.
Transfusion ; 60(12): 2828-2833, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808782

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Arkansas is a rural state of 3 million people. It is ranked fifth for poverty nationally. The first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Arkansas occurred on 11 March 2020. Since then, approximately 8% of all Arkansans have tested positive. Given the resource limitations of Arkansas, COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) was explored as a potentially lifesaving, therapeutic option. Therefore, the Arkansas Initiative for Convalescent Plasma was developed to ensure that every Arkansan has access to this therapy. STUDY DESIGN AND METHOD: This brief report describes the statewide collaborative response from hospitals, blood collectors, and the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) to ensure that CCP was available in a resource-limited state. RESULTS: Early contact tracing by ADH identified individuals who had come into contact with "patient zero" in early March. Within the first week, 32 patients tested positive for COVID-19. The first set of CCP collections occurred on 9 April 2020. Donors had to be triaged carefully in the initial period, as many had recently resolved their symptoms. From our first collections, with appropriate resource and inventory management, we collected sufficient CCP to provide the requested number of units for every patient treated with CCP in Arkansas. CONCLUSIONS: The Arkansas Initiative, a statewide effort to ensure CCP for every patient in a resource-limited state, required careful coordination among key players. Collaboration and resource management was crucial to meet the demand of CCP products and potentially save lives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Pandemics , Resource Allocation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Arkansas/epidemiology , Blood Banks/economics , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Planning/economics , Community Health Planning/organization & administration , Contact Tracing , Convalescence , Health Resources/economics , Health Services Accessibility/economics , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Intersectoral Collaboration , Poverty , Resource Allocation/economics , Rural Population
20.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 27(3): 147-151, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738780

ABSTRACT

Due to the government's early intervention such as mass lockdown and curtailment strategies towards mass gatherings, amid the COVID-19 outbreak, the organization of the voluntary blood donation camps have been suspended. It's most significant impact on the blood community has been a dramatic decrease in the number of blood donors. Therefore, our blood stock has almost dried up and put our inventory in a state of jeopardy. Additionally, all the elective surgeries and non-urgent clinical interventions have also been deferred during this time. This has led to a drop in the blood collection, demand as well as the issue at our blood center. With this backdrop, we intended to assess the effect of this mass lockdown on our blood supply management, particularly in two phases [phase-I prior to the outbreak] and phase-II [during the outbreak]. Transitioning back to the normal conditions would most likely depend on the extent and the time duration of this pandemic and associated behavioural change, which is foreseen to remain in effect well beyond the original estimates.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Academic Medical Centers , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
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