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1.
Transfusion ; 62(2): 279-285, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought tremendous challenges to the United States blood supply. Decreased collections have caused blood product shortages. The number of hospital-based donor centers (HBDCs) has decreased in the past decades, but they provide important support to their hospital systems. MATERIALS/METHODS: We identified 79 active HBDCs through an information request to the FDA. These centers were invited to participate in a survey about their activities, blood product collections, and perceived value. RESULTS: Thirty-six centers responded (46% response rate). The centers represented a wide range of states and geographic settings. Whole blood collection was most common, but some respondents also prepared specialized products such as COVID-19 convalescent plasma and pathogen-reduced platelets. Positive impacts of HBDCs included inventory availability, cost-effectiveness/savings, community outreach, supporting special patient populations, and collecting specialty products. All respondents anticipate at least stable operations, if not growth, in the future. CONCLUSION: HBDCs continue to be valuable assets in addressing emerging patient transfusion needs. Their unique offerings are tailored to the populations their hospitals support, and demonstrate the value in having the collection infrastructure in place to rapidly respond to critical shortages. This survey provides benchmark data about a broad group of HBDCs including products prepared, inventory self-sufficiency levels, and reasons for positive impact.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors , Hospitals , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , United States
2.
Transfus Med ; 31(6): 421-430, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480227

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to establish the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on blood collection and blood product usage at the end of the first year. BACKGROUND: The arrival of SARS-CoV-2 to Colombia on March 6, 2020, triggered closure of borders and mandatory lockdown from March 23, 2020. METHODS/MATERIALS: The Colombian National Institute of Health administers the National database of confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 and the National Haemovigilance System. We examined positive SARS-CoV-2 cases identified between March 6, 2020, and March 6, 2021, using positive RT-PCR testing (72.8%) or reactive antigen (27.2%). We also analysed accepted and deferred donors' information provided by 100% of blood banks and transfused patients notified by 83% of health care facilities nationwide, between March 1, 2019, to February 28, 2021. RESULTS: Colombia registered 2 273 245 SARS-CoV-2 cases. From these, 60 412 people died from COVID-19 (2.7%) and 2 172 418 individuals recovered (95.6%). There were 11 659 216 SARS-CoV-2 processed samples nationwide. People between the ages of 20 and 39 years concentrated 44.4% of the SARS-CoV-2 cases. There were 773 569 blood donations, mainly from a 20-39-year-old population (60.5%). The pandemic caused a reduction of 155 393 blood donations (16.7%) and 51 823 total deferrals (33.7%). An 18.4% drop in volunteer donors and a 37.3% increase in donations from family/replacements members were observed. There were 399 453 transfused patients and 1 179 895 blood components administered (-8.7% and - 13.9% compared to March 2019-February 2020). CONCLUSION: Mandatory lockdowns in Colombia decreased blood collection and usage, resulting in a reduction of blood components transfused to individual patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks , Blood Safety , COVID-19 , Adult , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors , Colombia/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Young Adult
4.
Transfusion ; 61(6): 1822-1829, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105380

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditionally, during crises the number of new blood donors increases. However, the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created additional barriers to donate due to governmental prevention measures and increased personal health risks. In this report, we examined how the pandemic affected new donor registrations in the Netherlands, especially among groups with higher risk profiles for severe COVID-19. Additionally, we explored the role of media for blood donation and new donor registrations. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed new donor registrations and attention for blood donation in newspapers and on social media from January until May 2020, in comparison to the same period in 2017 to 2019. RESULTS: After the introduction of nationwide prevention measures, several peaks in new donor registrations occurred, which coincided with peaks in media attention. Interestingly, people with a higher risk profile for COVID-19 (e.g., due to age or region of residence) were overrepresented among new registrants. DISCUSSION: In sum, the first peak of the current pandemic has led to increased new blood donor registrations, despite the associated increased health risks. Time and future studies will have to tell whether these new donors are one-off 'pandemic' donors or if they will become regular, loyal donors.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19 , Donor Selection , Adolescent , Adult , Advertising , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Banks/standards , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/psychology , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Blood Safety/methods , Blood Safety/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Donor Selection/methods , Donor Selection/organization & administration , Donor Selection/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Records/standards , Middle Aged , Motivation , Netherlands/epidemiology , Newspapers as Topic , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Social Media , Young Adult
5.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(1): 16-24, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spurred a global health crisis. The safety and supply of blood during this pandemic has been a concern of blood banks and transfusion services as it is expected to adversely affect blood system activities. We aim to assess the situation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) during the first months of the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey was designed to address blood supply, transfusion demand, and donor management during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Medical directors of different blood banks were invited to participate. RESULTS: A total of 16 centers participated with representation from 15/19 countries in the region. In total, 75% were from national blood banks. Most centres had a decrease in the blood supply, ranging from 26-50%. Representatives from 14 countries (93.3%) believed that public fear has contributed to a decrease in donations. Most centres (n=12, 75%) had a reduction in transfusion demand, while those who did not, reported heavy involvement in treating patients with underlying haemoglobinopathies and haematological malignancies. Half of the centres activated their contingency plans. Four centres had to alter the blood donor eligibility criteria to meet demands. All centres implemented donor deferral criteria in relation to SARS-CoV-2, but were variable in measures to mitigate the risk of donor and staff exposure. CONCLUSION: Blood services in the region faced variable degrees of blood shortages. We summarize lessons learnt during this pandemic for the blood banks to consider to plan, assess, and respond proportionately to future similar pandemics.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Africa, Northern , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Donor Selection/standards , Health Care Surveys , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Hemoglobinopathies/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Mediterranean Region , Middle East , Pakistan , Professional-Patient Relations
7.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 160-166, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-955504

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated how the Severe Acute Respiratory disease from Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) epidemic impacted transfusion services, transfusion support required by Covid-19 patients and their clinical outcome. BACKGROUND: In Italy, the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 infection was registered on 21 February 2020. As of 20 April, about 250 000 cases were registered, 1143 of which were in the province of Pescara. METHODS: We compared transfusion services provided by the blood centre of Pescara between 1 March and 20 April 2019 and between 1 March and 20 April 2020. We assessed the number and type of blood components donated, those transfused in the various hospital departments and those transfused to Covid-19 patients. RESULTS: Compared to 2019, we documented a decrease of 32% in the number of donations. The number of transfusions increased by 139% in the infectious diseases department (IDD), dedicated to Covid-19 patients, and by 76% in the intensive care unit (ICU), whereas it markedly decreased in the other departments. Of 299 patients with Covid-19, 60 were transfused (20.1%). Transfused patients in the ICU were significantly younger than those in IDD and had a lower number of lymphocytes, lower post-transfusion increment of haemoglobin levels and higher D-dimer and C reactive protein values. Mortality rate was 60.7% among transfused patients in the ICU and 39.0% among those in the IDD (p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: The Covid-19 epidemic had a profound impact on transfusion activities. The important blood demand for Covid-19 patients was satisfied because of the reduction in activities in other hospital wards. Covid-19-positive transfused patients showed a very poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome
8.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 206-212, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is the risk of shortages in Blood Centres. OBJECTIVES: To verify the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the blood donor's attendance and production of blood components in Fundação Hemominas, a Brazilian public institution was formed by several Blood Centres. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out from January to June 2020. Data collected were compared to a historical series from 2016 to 2019. RESULTS: The study showed a reduction in the attendance of blood donors, whole blood collections and blood component production from March 2020, when the first case of COVID-19 was notified in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The results evidenced that Hemominas Blood Centres were affected in a very distinct way by the pandemic with a general mean reduction around 17% in attendance of blood donors and in production of blood components in the period of March to June. On the other hand, the return of blood donors rate increased. CONCLUSION: The reduction in blood donation during the pandemic period was significant, despite the measures adopted. Still, the recruitment of return donors appears to be an important measure to be considered to decrease the pandemic's effect on blood stocks.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Component Removal/statistics & numerical data , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
11.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 155-159, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807793

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 epidemic has caused a significant global social and economic impact since December 2019. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the emergency response of a Chinese blood centre on maintaining both the safety and the sufficiency of blood supply during large, emerging, infectious epidemics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Early on in the outbreak of COVID-19, the Chengdu Blood Center developed strategies and implemented a series of measures, including enhanced recruitment efforts, addition of new donation deferral criteria and notification after donation, optimisation of donor experience, development and implementation of a new coronavirus nucleic acid detection technology platform for blood screening and screening all donations for SARS-CoV-2 RNA to maximumly protect the safety of blood supply during a time of unclear risk. RESULTS: Starting on February 20, the immediate satisfaction rate of blood product orders in Chengdu city's clinical settings reached 100%, and there was no case of blood transfusion infection. CONCLUSION: The recent experience during the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 reminded us that improvement in the areas of national and international collaborative programmes for dealing with blood availability and safety concerns during early stages of a disaster and regional and national mechanisms for timely communication with the general public on behalf of blood services should help to better prepare us for future disasters.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Blood Safety/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Donor Selection , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Pandemics , Plasma , Young Adult
13.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 27(3): 147-151, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738780

ABSTRACT

Due to the government's early intervention such as mass lockdown and curtailment strategies towards mass gatherings, amid the COVID-19 outbreak, the organization of the voluntary blood donation camps have been suspended. It's most significant impact on the blood community has been a dramatic decrease in the number of blood donors. Therefore, our blood stock has almost dried up and put our inventory in a state of jeopardy. Additionally, all the elective surgeries and non-urgent clinical interventions have also been deferred during this time. This has led to a drop in the blood collection, demand as well as the issue at our blood center. With this backdrop, we intended to assess the effect of this mass lockdown on our blood supply management, particularly in two phases [phase-I prior to the outbreak] and phase-II [during the outbreak]. Transitioning back to the normal conditions would most likely depend on the extent and the time duration of this pandemic and associated behavioural change, which is foreseen to remain in effect well beyond the original estimates.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Academic Medical Centers , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
Transfusion ; 60(10): 2199-2202, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-703648

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic caused downtrends in both blood collections and blood usage. Rapidly visualizing the impact of the pandemic and newly implemented hospital policies on usage could potentially inform blood ordering practices to help avoid wastage. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood usage data were obtained from the laboratory information system. An R-based workflow was written in R Markdown for analysis and visualization. Reports were generated daily and shared with blood bank leadership. Selected reports were shared with institutional leadership, other departments, and collaborating blood suppliers. RESULTS: Mean daily transfusions dropped 42% from 3/9-13 to 3/16-20, with a significant decrease in usage of red cells, plasma, and cryoprecipitate. The greatest decline in use was seen in the general operating rooms, whereas outpatient transfusions remained steady. Weekly total blood usage decreased through the end of March into April and returned to normal levels in May. CONCLUSION: During two 5-weekday periods of changing hospital policies, overall blood usage decreased by almost half. Visualization of usage by hospital location showed a large decrease in general operating room usage after cancellation of elective procedures. This data visualization has informed decisions to modify standing product orders during an initial period of decreased usage as well as return to normal orders in later months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Operating Rooms/statistics & numerical data
16.
Lancet Haematol ; 7(10): e756-e764, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624236

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has major implications for blood transfusion. There are uncertain patterns of demand, and transfusion institutions need to plan for reductions in donations and loss of crucial staff because of sickness and public health restrictions. We systematically searched for relevant studies addressing the transfusion chain-from donor, through collection and processing, to patients-to provide a synthesis of the published literature and guidance during times of potential or actual shortage. A reduction in donor numbers has largely been matched by reductions in demand for transfusion. Contingency planning includes prioritisation policies for patients in the event of predicted shortage. A range of strategies maintain ongoing equitable access to blood for transfusion during the pandemic, in addition to providing new therapies such as convalescent plasma. Sharing experience and developing expert consensus on the basis of evolving publications will help transfusion services and hospitals in countries at different stages in the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Transfusion , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , Blood Preservation , Blood Safety , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Donor Selection , Elective Surgical Procedures , Health Care Rationing , Health Policy , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hemoglobinopathies/complications , Hemoglobinopathies/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Vox Sang ; 115(6): 502-506, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-141773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected millions of people. A 'closed-off management' protocol has been launched nationwide in China to cope with this major public health emergency. However, these procedures may cause a crisis for blood donation and blood supply. In this study, we assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on blood donation and supply in Zhejiang province, which could provide reference and insight for developing countermeasures in other countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood donor and supply information from 38 blood centres during the Spring Festival of 2019 and 2020 were reviewed. A self-administered questionnaire was carried out. RESULTS: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of whole blood donors dropped by 67%. The success rate of recruitment for donations dropped by 60%. Most respondents (81·2%) were worried about the 'possibility of acquiring COVID-19 during blood donation'. The total amount of RBCs supply dropped by 65%. In the first week of the outbreak, the weekly amount of issued RBC units (10171·5 u) was almost six times higher than the collected units (1347·5 u). The mean haemoglobin value for RBCs transfusion was about 6·3 g/dl. About 4% of RBCs and 2·8% of frozen plasma were used in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The secondary consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic are blood shortages caused by the unavailability of blood donors, and this is likely to be replicated in many countries with high burdens of COVID-19. Practical actions to broaden sources and reduce use for the global crisis must be taken proactively.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Blood Donors/psychology , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Surveys and Questionnaires
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