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1.
J Clin Apher ; 36(4): 628-633, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Criteria for selection of FFP blood type has not been clearly established and use of group AB plasma is preferred by numerous transplantation protocols. AIMS: This study assesses the safety and efficacy of alternative group A or B plasma in ABO incompatible solid organ transplantation. MATERIALS & METHODS: Alternative use of group A or B plasma (incompatible plasma) was inevitable during the shortage of group AB plasma. Experience from select number of patients during the period of extreme group AB plasma shortage is described. RESULTS: The result of alternative use of group A or B plasma was within expectation, showing effective reduction of isoagglutinin titers for pre-operative desensitization and efficacy for treatment of post-operative patients. No immediate hemolytic transfusion reaction was reported. DISCUSSION: While validation in a larger cohort of patients is necessary, our limited experience have shown satisfactory clinical outcomes without adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Use of incompatible group A or B plasma is a viable option when group AB plasma is limited.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , Blood Group Incompatibility/therapy , Plasma Exchange/methods , Transplantation/methods , Agglutinins/chemistry , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Graft Survival , Hemolysis , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Patient Safety , Plasma/immunology , Plasmapheresis , Transfusion Reaction , Treatment Outcome
3.
Vox Sang ; 116(7): 774-784, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affected millions of people worldwide and caused disruptions at the global level including in healthcare provision. Countries of the WHO African region have put in place measures for the COVID-19 pandemic containment that may adversely affect blood system activities and subsequently reduce the supply and demand of blood and blood components. This study aims to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on blood supply and demand in the WHO African Region and propose measures to address the challenges faced by countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey questionnaire was sent to all 47 countries in the WHO African Region to collect information on blood supply and demand for the first 5 months of 2019 and 2020, respectively, and on COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma therapy in September 2020. RESULTS: Thirty-seven countries provided responses. The total number of blood donations dropped in 32 countries while it increased in five countries. The proportion of blood drives also decreased in 21 countries and increased in nine countries. The blood requested and issued for transfusion decreased for blood demand and for blood issued for transfusion in 30 countries. Ten countries reported some activities of convalescent plasma. However, very few units of this product collected have been transfused to COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a reduction of blood related activities in the region, including the supply and demand. Countries preparedness plans for health emergencies need more emphasis to maintaining blood stock.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Blood , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , World Health Organization
5.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 200-205, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the number of actually Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected blood donors applying a statistical forecasting model. BACKGROUND: Following the outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic, a drop in blood donation has been observed. It is crucial to determine the actual number of potential SARS-CoV-2-positive donors to define the measures and ensure adequate blood supply. METHODS: The cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 positivity, calculated on the general population, was applied to the donor population by estimating the number of positive subjects. The calculation model was validated by the linear interpolation method. The number of blood units actually discarded based on post-donation information was also taken into account. RESULTS: Three months after the outbreak, 5322 donors were estimated to be positive for SARS-CoV-2 and were therefore potentially excluded from donation. A total of units of blood components were discarded following post donation information. The estimated number of donors deceased (180) and the number of clinically recovered individuals in the same period was also considered. CONCLUSION: This forecasting model can be used to obtain information on blood donors' involvement during future SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks, especially in case of changes concerning epidemiology, incidence by age bracket and geographical distribution and also for new outbreaks of emerging viruses.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Safety/statistics & numerical data , Donor Selection/statistics & numerical data , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Young Adult
6.
Blood Transfus ; 19(2): 158-167, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is placing blood and tissue establishments under unprecedented stress, putting its capacity to provide the adequate care needed at risk. Here we reflect on how our integrated organisational model has faced the first impact of the pandemic and describe what challenges, opportunities and lessons have emerged. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The organisational model of the Catalan Blood and Tissue Bank (Banc de Sang i Teixits, BST) is described. The new scenario was managed by following international recommendations and considering the pandemic in a context of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA), allowing rapid measures to be taken. These aimed to: ensure donor safety, promote proper responses to patients' needs, ensure the health and well-being of personnel, and prepare for future scenarios. RESULTS: The BST has adapted its activities to the changes in demand. No shortage of any product or service occurred. Donor acceptance, safety and wellbeing were maintained except for tissue donation, which almost completely stopped. To support the health system, several activities have been promoted: large-scale convalescent plasma (CP) production, clinical trials with CP and mesenchymal stromal cells, massive COVID-19 diagnoses, and participation in co-operative research and publications. Haemovigilance is running smoothly and no adverse effects have been detected among donors or patients. DISCUSSION: Several elements have proven to be critical when addressing the pandemic scenario: a) the early creation of a crisis committee in combination with technical recommendations and the recognition of a VUCA scenario; b) identification of the strategies described; c) the integrated donor-to-patient organisational model; d) active Research and Development (R&D); and e) the flexibility of the staff. It is essential to underline the importance of the need for centralised management, effective contingency strategies, and early collaboration with peers.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Banks/organization & administration , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors , Bone Marrow Transplantation , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Models, Organizational , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Safety , Spain , Tissue and Organ Procurement
8.
Ciênc. Saúde Colet ; 25(12): 4969-4978, Dec. 2020. tab
Article in English, Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-961485

ABSTRACT

Resumo O artigo tem por objetivo discutir as consequências das medidas de distanciamento social sobre a disponibilidade de sangue e a organização dos serviços hemoterápicos no início da pandemia de Covid-19 no Brasil. A partir do acesso às notícias publicadas no mês de abril de 2020 nos sites das Hemorredes estaduais do país e organizadas em matriz Excel, foram elaborados quadros-síntese e descrição de resultados. A situação crítica de abastecimento de sangue, em especial para alguns tipos sanguíneos, foi constatada em muitos estados, devido à circulação do novo coronavírus. A adoção de medidas de distanciamento social e a manutenção das demandas por transfusão para tratamentos, urgência e emergência, requereram a implantação e a implementação de estratégias e ações para reorganização dos serviços. Medidas de proteção foram incorporadas, fluxos alterados e rotinas estabelecidas. Este estudo evidencia o quanto a situação epidemiológica da Covid-19 e as medidas necessárias para o seu controle influenciaram sobre a situação dos estoques e disponibilidade de sangue, e, demandaram, mudanças na organização dos serviços hemoterápicos a fim de assegurar a proteção, mitigar os riscos de propagação do vírus e garantir o suprimento de sangue para o atendimento às necessidades do sistema de saúde.


Abstract The article aims to discuss the consequences of social distancing measures on the availability of blood and organization of blood therapy services at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic in Brazil. News published in April 2020 on the websites of the country's state Blood Service Networks were consulted and organized in an Excel spreadsheet, presented in summary charts, and descriptions of results were prepared. A critical situation of blood supply, especially of some blood types, has been observed in many states. This situation is influenced by the circulation of the new coronavirus. The adoption of social distancing measures associated with unchanged transfusion demands for outpatient, urgency and emergency care required the implementation of strategies and actions for the reorganization of the services. Protection measures were incorporated, flows were changed and new routines were established. This study shows the extent to which the epidemiological situation of Covid-19 and the necessary measures for its control influenced the stocks and availability of blood. Changes in the organization of blood therapy services were fundamental in order to ensure protection, mitigate the risks of spreading the virus, and ensure the blood supply to meet the needs of the health system.


Subject(s)
Personal Space , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Hematology/organization & administration , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Brazil/epidemiology , Internet
10.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 206-212, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is the risk of shortages in Blood Centres. OBJECTIVES: To verify the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the blood donor's attendance and production of blood components in Fundação Hemominas, a Brazilian public institution was formed by several Blood Centres. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out from January to June 2020. Data collected were compared to a historical series from 2016 to 2019. RESULTS: The study showed a reduction in the attendance of blood donors, whole blood collections and blood component production from March 2020, when the first case of COVID-19 was notified in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The results evidenced that Hemominas Blood Centres were affected in a very distinct way by the pandemic with a general mean reduction around 17% in attendance of blood donors and in production of blood components in the period of March to June. On the other hand, the return of blood donors rate increased. CONCLUSION: The reduction in blood donation during the pandemic period was significant, despite the measures adopted. Still, the recruitment of return donors appears to be an important measure to be considered to decrease the pandemic's effect on blood stocks.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Component Removal/statistics & numerical data , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
11.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 155-159, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807793

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 epidemic has caused a significant global social and economic impact since December 2019. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the emergency response of a Chinese blood centre on maintaining both the safety and the sufficiency of blood supply during large, emerging, infectious epidemics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Early on in the outbreak of COVID-19, the Chengdu Blood Center developed strategies and implemented a series of measures, including enhanced recruitment efforts, addition of new donation deferral criteria and notification after donation, optimisation of donor experience, development and implementation of a new coronavirus nucleic acid detection technology platform for blood screening and screening all donations for SARS-CoV-2 RNA to maximumly protect the safety of blood supply during a time of unclear risk. RESULTS: Starting on February 20, the immediate satisfaction rate of blood product orders in Chengdu city's clinical settings reached 100%, and there was no case of blood transfusion infection. CONCLUSION: The recent experience during the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 reminded us that improvement in the areas of national and international collaborative programmes for dealing with blood availability and safety concerns during early stages of a disaster and regional and national mechanisms for timely communication with the general public on behalf of blood services should help to better prepare us for future disasters.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Blood Safety/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Donor Selection , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Pandemics , Plasma , Young Adult
12.
Vox Sang ; 116(2): 175-180, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 first appeared in Iran on 19 February 2020, and then spread rapidly over the country. In this article, we review the action plan of the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization with respect to this disease. METHOD AND MATERIALS: We collected data on blood donations and RBC inventory for the first 8 weeks of the outbreak. We also evaluated the trend of blood donations and RBC inventory and compared them with the data of the past year. We include a summary of actions taken by the National Committee on Management of COVID-19 outbreak. RESULTS: Blood donations decreased from 33 275 to 23 465 units during the first 2 weeks of the outbreak with a corresponding decrease in the RBC inventory. But after that, donations gradually increased from 23 465 to 29 665 units. RBC inventory levels improved at the same time. Then, the Iranian New Year's holiday resulted in another downward trend. After the holiday, blood donations revived, along with the RBC inventory. DISCUSSION: Although it appears that this virus cannot be transmitted through transfusion, changes in lifestyle had a significant impact on reducing blood supply. Following implemented measures, we saw an upward trend in blood donations and an adequate supply of RBC units in blood centres, helped by a reduction in demand by hospitals. Blood centres need to be more prepared to manage future viral disasters, especially in case of transfusion-transmissible infections.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Blood Safety , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Transfusion , China , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Life Style , Safety Management , Transfusion Reaction/prevention & control
15.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 59(5): 102836, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526671

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maintaining blood supply is essential since blood transfusions are lifesaving in many conditions. The 2003 infectious outbreak of SARS-CoV had a negative impact on blood supply. This study aimed to measure donor attendance and blood demand in order to help find efficient ways of managing blood supply and demand during the COVID-19 pandemic and similar public emergencies in the future. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from donor attendance, mobile blood drives and blood inventory records were retrospectively obtained for the period between 1 September 2019 and 1 May 2020 to assess the impact of COVID-19 on donor attendance and the management of blood supply and demand in King Abdullah Hospital, Bisha, Saudi Arabia. Data were analysed using SPSSStatistics, version 25.0. Categorical variables were described using frequencies and percentages. RESULTS: After imported cases of COVID-19 were reported in Saudi Arabia, donor attendance and blood supply at blood bank-based collections showed a drop of 39.5%. On the other hand, blood demand during the same period was reduced by 21.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on donor attendance and blood supply and adversely affected blood transfusion services. Guidelines that prioritize blood transfusion should prepare at the beginning of emergencies similar to this pandemic. Close monitoring of blood needs and blood supply and appropriate response is essential for avoiding sudden blood shortage. An evidence-based emergency blood management plan and flexible regulatory policy should be ready to deal with any disaster and to respond quickly in the case of blood shortage.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/supply & distribution , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
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