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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 778913, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574246

ABSTRACT

The current global pandemic of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing COVID-19, has infected millions of people and continues to pose a threat to many more. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important player of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) expressed on the surface of the lung, heart, kidney, neurons, and endothelial cells, which mediates SARS-CoV-2 entry into the host cells. The cytokine storms of COVID-19 arise from the large recruitment of immune cells because of the dis-synchronized hyperactive immune system, lead to many abnormalities including hyper-inflammation, endotheliopathy, and hypercoagulability that produce multi-organ dysfunction and increased the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis resulting in more severe illness and mortality. We discuss the aberrated interconnectedness and forthcoming crosstalks between immunity, the endothelium, and coagulation, as well as how sex disparities affect the severity and outcome of COVID-19 and harm men especially. Further, our conceptual framework may help to explain why persistent symptoms, such as reduced physical fitness and fatigue during long COVID, may be rooted in the clotting system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Endothelium/metabolism , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators , Male , Renin-Angiotensin System , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors
2.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 193(Pt A): 948-955, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471998

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) keeps on destroying normal social integrity worldwide, bringing about extraordinary medical services, cultural and financial interruption. Individuals with diabetes have been demonstrated to be at higher risk of complications and even death when exposed to SARS-CoV-2. Regardless of pandemic scale infection, there is presently limited comprehension on the potential impact of SARS-CoV-2 on individuals with diabetes. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant circulating plasma protein in human serum and attracted more interest from researchers because most susceptible to non-enzymatic glycation reactions. Albumin down-regulates the expression of ACE2 that is the target receptor of COVID-19. Hypoalbuminemia, coagulopathy, and vascular disease have been connected in COVID-19 and appear to predict outcomes independent of age and morbidity. This review discusses the most recent evidence that the ACE/ACE2 ratio could influence by human serum albumin both the susceptibility of individuals to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the outcome of the COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serum Albumin, Human/metabolism , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Vascular Diseases/blood , Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Vascular Diseases/therapy
3.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1747-1751, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few observations exist with respect to the pro-coagulant profile of patients with COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Reports of thromboembolic complications are scarce but suggestive for a clinical relevance of the problem. OBJECTIVES: Prospective observational study aimed to characterize the coagulation profile of COVID-19 ARDS patients with standard and viscoelastic coagulation tests and to evaluate their changes after establishment of an aggressive thromboprophylaxis. METHODS: Sixteen patients with COVID-19 ARDS received a complete coagulation profile at the admission in the intensive care unit. Ten patients were followed in the subsequent 7 days, after increasing the dose of low molecular weight heparin, antithrombin levels correction, and clopidogrel in selected cases. RESULTS: At baseline, the patients showed a pro-coagulant profile characterized by an increased clot strength (CS, median 55 hPa, 95% interquartile range 35-63), platelet contribution to CS (PCS, 43 hPa; interquartile range 24-45), fibrinogen contribution to CS (FCS, 12 hPa; interquartile range 6-13.5) elevated D-dimer levels (5.5 µg/mL, interquartile range 2.5-6.5), and hyperfibrinogenemia (794 mg/dL, interquartile range 583-933). Fibrinogen levels were associated (R2  = .506, P = .003) with interleukin-6 values. After increasing the thromboprophylaxis, there was a significant (P = .001) time-related decrease of fibrinogen levels, D-dimers (P = .017), CS (P = .013), PCS (P = .035), and FCS (P = .038). CONCLUSION: The pro-coagulant pattern of these patients may justify the clinical reports of thromboembolic complications (pulmonary embolism) during the course of the disease. Further studies are needed to assess the best prophylaxis and treatment of this condition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Aged , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
4.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1752-1755, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317980

ABSTRACT

A prothrombotic coagulopathy is commonly found in critically ill COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A unique feature of COVID-19 respiratory failure is a relatively preserved lung compliance and high Alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, with pathology reports consistently demonstrating diffuse pulmonary microthrombi on autopsy, all consistent with a vascular occlusive etiology of respiratory failure rather than the more classic findings of low-compliance in ARDS. The COVID-19 pandemic is overwhelming the world's medical care capacity with unprecedented needs for mechanical ventilators and high rates of mortality once patients progress to needing mechanical ventilation, and in many environments including in parts of the United States the medical capacity is being exhausted. Fibrinolytic therapy has previously been used in a Phase 1 clinical trial that led to reduced mortality and marked improvements in oxygenation. Here we report a series of three patients with severe COVID-19 respiratory failure who were treated with tissue plasminogen activator. All three patients had a temporally related improvement in their respiratory status, with one of them being a durable response.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Fatal Outcome , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recovery of Function , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
5.
A A Pract ; 15(4): e01432, 2021 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158241

ABSTRACT

The role of concurrent illness in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is unknown. Patients with leukemia may display altered thromboinflammatory responses. We report a 53-year-old man presenting with acute leukemia and COVID-19 who developed thrombotic complications and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Multiple analyses, including rotational thromboelastometry and flow cytometry on blood and bronchoalveolar lavage, are reported to characterize coagulation and immune profiles. The patient developed chemotherapy-induced neutropenia that may have protected his lungs from granulocyte-driven hyperinflammatory acute lung injury. However, neutropenia also alters viral clearing, potentially enabling ongoing viral propagation. This case depicts a precarious equilibrium between leukemia and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/complications , Acute Lung Injury/diagnosis , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , COVID-19/diagnosis , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/diagnosis , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutropenia/complications , Neutropenia/diagnosis , Neutropenia/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombelastography , Virulence Factors
6.
J Heart Lung Transplant ; 40(7): 631-641, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The shortage of blood products has become a worldwide problem, especially during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Here, we investigated whether a point of care (POC) approach to perioperative bleeding and coagulopathy based on rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) results could decrease perioperative blood loss and the perioperative consumption of blood products during lung transplantation. METHODS: Patients undergoing bilateral lung transplantation were randomized into two groups: In the first group, designated the "non POC" group, the management of perioperative bleeding and coagulopathy was based on the clinical experience of the anesthesiologist; in the second group, designated the "POC" group, the management of perioperative bleeding, and coagulopathy was based on the ROTEM results. RESULTS: After performing an interim statistical analysis, the project was prematurely terminated as the results were significantly in favor of the POC approach. Data were analyzed for the period January 2018 until June 2020 when 67 patients were recruited into the study. There was significantly decreased perioperative blood loss in the POC group (n = 31 patients) with p = 0.013, decreased perioperative consumption of RBC with p = 0.009, and decreased perioperative consumption of fresh frozen plasma with p < 0.0001 (practically no fresh frozen plasma was used in the POC group) without deteriorating clot formation in secondary and primary hemostasis as compared to the non POC group (n = 36). CONCLUSION: POC management of perioperative bleeding and coagulopathy based on ROTEM results is a promising strategy to decrease perioperative blood loss and the consumption of blood products in lung transplantation.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hemostasis/physiology , Lung Transplantation/adverse effects , Pandemics , Thrombelastography/methods , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , Blood Transfusion/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6515, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147151

ABSTRACT

High sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) is a strong predictor of adverse outcome during SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, its determinants remain partially unknown. We aimed to assess the relationship between severity of inflammatory response/coagulation abnormalities and hsTnT in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). We then explored the relevance of these pathways in defining mortality and complications risk and the potential effects of the treatments to attenuate such risk. In this single-center, prospective, observational study we enrolled 266 consecutive patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Primary endpoint was in-hospital COVID-19 mortality. hsTnT, even after adjustment for confounders, was associated with mortality. D-dimer and CRP presented stronger associations with hsTnT than PaO2. Changes of hsTnT, D-dimer and CRP were related; but only D-dimer was associated with mortality. Moreover, low molecular weight heparin showed attenuation of the mortality in the whole population, particularly in subjects with higher hsTnT. D-dimer possessed a strong relationship with hsTnT and mortality. Anticoagulation treatment showed greater benefits with regard to mortality. These findings suggest a major role of SARS-CoV-2 coagulopathy in hsTnT elevation and its related mortality in COVID-19. A better understanding of the mechanisms related to COVID-19 might pave the way to therapy tailoring in these high-risk individuals.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Heart Diseases/etiology , Hemodynamics , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Inflammation , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Troponin T/blood
9.
Rev Med Interne ; 42(2): 93-100, 2021 Feb.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118648

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus caused a global pandemic within weeks. Many patients with severe COVID-19 present with coagulation abnormalities, including increase D-dimers. This coagulopathy is associated with an increased risk of death. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with severe COVID-19 develop sometimes unrecognized, venous thromboembolic complications. A better understanding of COVID-19 pathophysiology, in particular hemostatic disorders, will help to choose appropriate treatment strategies. A rigorous thrombotic risk assessment and the implementation of a suitable anticoagulation strategy are required. We review here the characteristics of COVID-19 coagulation laboratory findings in affected patients, the incidence of thromboembolic events and their specificities, and potential therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/prevention & control , COVID-19/blood , Humans , Incidence , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
10.
An Sist Sanit Navar ; 43(2): 245-249, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083299

ABSTRACT

One of the most significant negative prognostic factors in patients suffering from the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) is the development of coagulopathy, associated with abnormal laboratory findings, such as increased D-dimer, and venous thromboembolic complications, requiring thromboprophylactic strategies. The main clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients are revised here as compared to other coronavirus infections, such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), emphasizing clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus , Thrombosis/virology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/therapy
11.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 216(4): 1088-1098, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067591

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is known to be associated with a distinct form of coagulopathy. OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to describe the imaging manifestations of COVID-19-associated coagulopathy across anatomic sites and modalities in hospitalized patients and to identify clinical variables associated with positive imaging findings. METHODS. We conducted a retrospective review of consecutive adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to our hospital over a 3-week period. Data on patient demographics, hematologic values, cross-sectional imaging examinations, and clinical outcomes (death and intubation) were collected. Imaging was reviewed for manifestations of coagulopathy. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations of patient demographics, hematologic markers, and outcomes with the need for imaging and imaging manifestations of coagulopathy. RESULTS. Of 308 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, 142 (46%) underwent 332 cross-sectional imaging examinations. Of these, 37 (26%) had imaging results positive for coagulopathy. The most common imaging manifestations of coagulopathy were pulmonary embolus (n = 21) on contrast-enhanced CT or CTA, thrombus in the upper- or lower-extremity veins (n = 13) on Doppler ultrasound, end-organ infarction in the bowel (n = 4) and kidney (n = 4) on contrast-enhanced CT, and thrombus or parenchymal infarction in the brain (n = 2) on contrast-enhanced CTA or MRI with MRA. Among patients with imaging results positive for coagulopathy, eight (22%) had multisite involvement. Thrombi were multifocal in four of five patients with positive upper-extremity and three of eight patients with positive lower-extremity examination results and involved superficial veins, deep veins, or both. In multivariable analysis, intubation (p < .001) and prolonged prothrombin time (p = .04) were significantly associated with undergoing imaging. No patient variable was significantly associated with imaging results positive for coagulopathy (p > .05). CONCLUSION. Imaging commonly shows manifestations of coagulopathy in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Over one-fifth of patients with such manifestations show multisite involvement. Clinical variables poorly predict which patients have positive imaging results, indicating a complementary role of imaging in detecting COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. CLINICAL IMPACT. In patients with COVID-19 with suspected systemic coagulopathy, pulmonary CTA, extremity Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, and contrast-enhanced brain MRI and MRA may all be appropriate in the absence of imaging contraindications.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Inpatients , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Ultrasonography/methods , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Rev Med Interne ; 42(2): 93-100, 2021 Feb.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053760

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus caused a global pandemic within weeks. Many patients with severe COVID-19 present with coagulation abnormalities, including increase D-dimers. This coagulopathy is associated with an increased risk of death. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with severe COVID-19 develop sometimes unrecognized, venous thromboembolic complications. A better understanding of COVID-19 pathophysiology, in particular hemostatic disorders, will help to choose appropriate treatment strategies. A rigorous thrombotic risk assessment and the implementation of a suitable anticoagulation strategy are required. We review here the characteristics of COVID-19 coagulation laboratory findings in affected patients, the incidence of thromboembolic events and their specificities, and potential therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/prevention & control , COVID-19/blood , Humans , Incidence , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
14.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(3): 225-228, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028646

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated coagulopathy is unusual, poorly defined and is linked with significant hypercoagulability and microthrombotic and macrothrombotic complications leading to worse outcomes and higher mortality. Conventional coagulation assays do not always actively reflect these derangements and might fail to detect this coagulopathy. Viscoelastic hemostatic assays (VHA) provide a possible tool that adds to conventional coagulation assays in identifying this hypercoagulable state. VHA has been mostly used in surgery and trauma but it's still not well defined in sepsis patients with lack of large randomized trials. Few studies described VHA findings in patients with COVID-19 showing significant hypercoagulability and fibrinolysis shutdown. Clinicians taking care of these patients might have little experience interpreting VHA results. By reviewing the available literature on the use of VHA in sepsis, and the current knowledge on COVID-19-associated coagulopathy we provide clinicians with a practical guide on VHA utilization in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/blood , Hemostasis , Thrombelastography , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Humans , Sepsis/blood
15.
Mil Med Res ; 7(1): 19, 2020 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72008

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, a novel type of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Wuhan led to an outbreak throughout China and the rest of the world. To date, there have been more than 1,260,000 COVID-19 patients, with a mortality rate of approximately 5.44%. Studies have shown that coagulation dysfunction is a major cause of death in patients with severe COVID-19. Therefore, the People's Liberation Army Professional Committee of Critical Care Medicine and Chinese Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis grouped experts from the frontline of the Wuhan epidemic to come together and develop an expert consensus on diagnosis and treatment of coagulation dysfunction associated with a severe COVID-19 infection. This consensus includes an overview of COVID-19-related coagulation dysfunction, tests for coagulation, anticoagulation therapy, replacement therapy, supportive therapy and prevention. The consensus produced 18 recommendations which are being used to guide clinical work.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , China , Consensus , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Am J Clin Pathol ; 155(4): 498-505, 2021 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968303

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have thromboembolic complications. Assessment of coagulation and other markers could be useful to understand their coagulopathy. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of inflammatory and coagulation parameters, including prothrombin fragment 1.2 (PF1.2), thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TATs), fibrin monomers, and D-dimer, in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. We compared the markers in patients with thrombosis, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), and poor outcome. RESULTS: Of the 81 patients, 9 (11%) experienced an acute thrombotic event (4 with pulmonary embolism, 3 with venous thrombosis, and 2 with stroke). PF1.2 was elevated in 32 (39%) patients, TATs in 54 (67%), fibrin monomers in 49 (60%), and D-dimer in 76 (94%). Statistically significant elevation in PF1.2 and TATs was seen in patients admitted to the ICU, while D-dimer and fibrin monomers were significantly elevated in patients with poor outcomes. The presence of multiple abnormal coagulation parameters was associated with ICU admission. Other parameters with statistically significant results included abnormal WBC counts and elevated C-reactive protein, which were associated with ICU admission and poor outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that abnormalities of biomarkers of hemostasis activation and inflammatory markers are associated with poor outcomes in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/complications , Hemostasis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
17.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(24): 24535-24551, 2020 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940615

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 patients frequently exhibit coagulation abnormalities and thrombotic events. In this meta-analysis, we investigated the association between coagulopathy and the severity of COVID-19 illness. Using PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, WanFang Database, CNKI, and medRxiv, a systematic literature search was conducted for studies published between December 1, 2019 and May 1, 2020. We then analyzed coagulation parameters in COVID-19 patients exhibiting less severe and more severe symptoms. All statistical analyses were performed using Stata14.0 software. A total of 3,952 confirmed COVID-19 patients from 25 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Patients with severe symptoms exhibited higher levels of D-dimer, prothrombin time (PT), and fibrinogen (FIB) than patients with less severe symptoms (SMD 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.97, I2 56.9%; SMD 0.39, 95% CI: 0.14-0.64, I2 79.4%; and SMD 0.35, 95% CI: 0.17-0.53, I2 42.4%, respectively). However, platelet and activated partial thromboplastin times did not differ (SMD -0.26, 95% CI: -0.56-0.05, I2 82.2%; and SMD -0.14, 95% CI: -0.45-0.18, I2 75.7%, respectively). These findings demonstrate that hypercoagulable coagulopathy is associated with the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and that D-dimer, PT, and FIB values are the main parameters that should be considered when evaluating coagulopathy in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/epidemiology , Blood Coagulation Tests/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Publication Bias , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(43): e22635, 2020 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894688

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has became a major problem affecting global health security.To assess the differences and dynamic changes of blood coagulation function in COVID-19 patients with different severity.A total of 261 COVID-19 patients from January 24 to March 25, 2020 in Huangshi, Hubei Province were enrolled.We designed a retrospective observational study. Clinical information, including age, blood routine and blood coagulation function, were collected. According to the Diagnosis and Treatment Guidelines for COVID-19 (seventh version) that issued by the National Health Committee of the People's Republic of China, patients were divided into 3 subgroups: 186 ordinary, 45 severe and 30 critical ones. We compared the differences in blood coagulation factors among groups.Average age in critical group (71.47 ±â€Š11.48 years) was the oldest of 3 subgroups. At admission, statistically differences could be observed among ordinary, severe and critical patients in D-dimer (0.18 ±â€Š0.33, 0.63 ±â€Š1.13 and 1.16 ±â€Š1.58 mg/L), fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDP) (3.11 ±â€Š5.30, 9.82 ±â€Š23.91 and 21.94 ±â€Š40.98 µg/ml), platelet [(169 ±â€Š62.85), (188 ±â€Š71.56) and (117 ±â€Š38.31) × 10/L)] and lymphocyte count [(1.18 ±â€Š0.46), (0.82 ±â€Š0.35) and (0.75 ±â€Š0.39) × 10/L)], respectively (P < .05). During hospitalization, the peak values of coagulation and valley values of blood routine were monitored. There were significant differences among ordinary, severe and critical patients in D-dimer (0.26 ±â€Š0.46, 1.39 ±â€Š1.51 and 2.89 ±â€Š1.68 mg/L), FDP (3.29 ±â€Š5.52, 23.68 ±â€Š39.07 and 56.11 ±â€Š49.94 µg/ml), platelet [(164 ±â€Š55.53), (171 ±â€Š69.96) and (84 ±â€Š57.80) × 10/L)] and lymphocyte count [(1.10 ±â€Š0.46), (0.65 ±â€Š0.35) and (0.55 ±â€Š0.31) × 10/L)], respectively (P < .001). D-dimer and FDP in the course of disease in severe/critical groups showed a first upward and then downward trend.We concluded that coagulation function indexes such as D-dimer and FDP could be served as markers to estimate COVID-19 patients condition. Close monitoring of coagulation function may be helpful for early diagnosis of severe patients and guidance of treatments.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/physiopathology , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Am J Clin Pathol ; 155(3): 333-342, 2021 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892069

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Laboratory testing and the measurement of appropriate biomarkers play a critical role in managing patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), allowing for disease diagnosis, monitoring progression, prognostication, prediction of treatment response, and risk stratification. We sought to characterize these effects on a more detailed, mechanistic level. METHODS: We reviewed the literature and identified a multitude of reports that describe the unique effects of this virus and its devastating consequences to multiple organ systems in COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: There are specific alterations in biomarkers related to coagulation, depopulation of T-cell subtypes, the cytokine storm and inflammation, and kidney and cardiac dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory measurement of specific parameters and the use of appropriate prognostic, predictive, and monitoring biomarkers afford clinicians the ability to make informed medical decisions and guide therapy for patients afflicted with this dreaded disease.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/virology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/virology , Kidney Diseases/diagnosis , Kidney Diseases/virology
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