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1.
Cell Mol Biol Lett ; 27(1): 6, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622208

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), is associated with a high mortality rate. The majority of deaths in this disease are caused by ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome) followed by cytokine storm and coagulation complications. Although alterations in the level of the number of coagulation factors have been detected in samples from COVID-19 patients, the direct molecular mechanism which has been involved in this pathologic process has not been explored yet. The PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is an intracellular pathway which plays a central role in cell survival. Also, in recent years the association between this pathway and coagulopathies has been well clarified. Therefore, based on the evidence on over-activity of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in SARS-CoV-2 infection, in the current review, the probable role of this cellular pathway as a therapeutic target for the prevention of coagulation complications in patients with COVID-19 is discussed.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/complications , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580687

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection is associated with a broad spectrum of presentations, but alveolar capillary microthrombi have been described as a common finding in COVID-19 patients, appearing as a consequence of a severe endothelial injury with endothelial cell membrane disruption. These observations clearly point to the identification of a COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, which may contribute to thrombosis, multi-organ damage, and cause of severity and fatality. One significant finding that emerges in prothrombotic abnormalities observed in COVID-19 patients is that the coagulation alterations are mainly mediated by the activation of platelets and intrinsically related to viral-mediated endothelial inflammation. Beyond the well-known role in hemostasis, the ability of platelets to also release various potent cytokines and chemokines has elevated these small cells from simple cell fragments to crucial modulators in the blood, including their inflammatory functions, that have a large influence on the immune response during infectious disease. Indeed, platelets are involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury also by promoting NET formation and affecting vascular permeability. Specifically, the deposition by activated platelets of the chemokine platelet factor 4 at sites of inflammation promotes adhesion of neutrophils on endothelial cells and thrombogenesis, and it seems deeply involved in the phenomenon of vaccine-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Importantly, the hyperactivated platelet phenotype along with evidence of cytokine storm, high levels of P-selectin, D-dimer, and, on the other hand, decreased levels of fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and thrombocytopenia may be considered suitable biomarkers that distinguish the late stage of COVID-19 progression in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , COVID-19/blood , Thrombosis/pathology , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hemostasis , Humans , Inflammation , Phenotype , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombocytopenia/metabolism , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology
3.
Anaesthesist ; 70(8): 662-670, 2021 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of sepsis and septic shock, coagulopathy often occurs due to the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation. Sepsis-induced coagulopathy (SIC) is the most severe and potentially fatal form. Anticoagulants used in prophylactic or therapeutic doses are discussed to potentially exert beneficial effects in patients with sepsis and/or SIC; however, due to the lack of evidence recent guidelines are limited to recommendations for drug prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), while treatment of SIC has not been addressed. METHODS: In order to determine the status quo of VTE prophylaxis as well as treatment of SIC in German intensive care units (ICU), we conducted a Germany-wide online survey among heads of ICUs from October 2019 to May 2020. In April 2020, the survey was supplemented by an additional block of questions on VTE prophylaxis and SIC treatment in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. RESULTS: A total of 67 senior doctors took part in the survey. The majority (n = 50; 74.6%) of the responses were from ICU under the direction of an anesthesiologist and/or a department of anesthesiology. Most of the participants worked either at a university hospital (n = 31; 47.8%) or an academic teaching hospital (n = 27; 40.3%). The survey results show a pronounced heterogeneity in clinical practice with respect to the prophylaxis of VTE as well as SIC treatment. In an exemplary case of pneumogenic sepsis, low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) were by far the most frequently mentioned group of medications (n = 51; 76.1% of the responding ITS). In the majority of cases (n = 43; 64.2%), anti-FXa activity is not monitored with the use of LMWH in prophylaxis doses. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) was listed as a strategy for VTE prophylaxis in 37.3% of the responses (n = 25). In an exemplary case of abdominal sepsis 54.5% of the participants (n = 36; multiple answers possible) stated the use of UFH or LMWH and UFH with dosage controlled by PTT is used on two participating ICUs. The anti-FXa activity under prophylactic anticoagulation with LMWH is monitored in 7 participating clinics (10.6%) in abdominal sepsis. Systematic screening for sepsis-associated coagulation disorders does not take place in most hospitals and patterns in the use of anticoagulants show significant variability between ICUs. In the case of COVID-19 patients, it is particularly noticeable that in three quarters of the participating ICUs the practice of drug-based VTE prophylaxis and SIC treatment does not differ from that of non-COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The heterogeneity of answers collected in the survey suggests that a systematic approach to this topic via clinical trials is urgently needed to underline individualized patient care with the necessary evidence.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants , Blood Coagulation Disorders , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Sepsis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19 , Germany , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Sepsis/complications
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 778913, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574246

ABSTRACT

The current global pandemic of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing COVID-19, has infected millions of people and continues to pose a threat to many more. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important player of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) expressed on the surface of the lung, heart, kidney, neurons, and endothelial cells, which mediates SARS-CoV-2 entry into the host cells. The cytokine storms of COVID-19 arise from the large recruitment of immune cells because of the dis-synchronized hyperactive immune system, lead to many abnormalities including hyper-inflammation, endotheliopathy, and hypercoagulability that produce multi-organ dysfunction and increased the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis resulting in more severe illness and mortality. We discuss the aberrated interconnectedness and forthcoming crosstalks between immunity, the endothelium, and coagulation, as well as how sex disparities affect the severity and outcome of COVID-19 and harm men especially. Further, our conceptual framework may help to explain why persistent symptoms, such as reduced physical fitness and fatigue during long COVID, may be rooted in the clotting system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Endothelium/metabolism , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators , Male , Renin-Angiotensin System , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors
5.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(13-14): 899-903, 2021 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493267

ABSTRACT

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 has a profound influence on the hematopoetic system that mediates clinical symptoms and mortality. Several studies have shown that treatment of the cytokine storm (CRS) with anti-inflammatory drugs like dexamethasone and tocilizumab can significantly improve survival. Systematic reviews confirm the safety of convalescent plasma administration and offer initial indications of its effectiveness in certain groups. COVID-associated coagulopathy (CAC) and vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) represent severe infection- or vaccination associated complications that require a specific diagnostic and therapeutic workup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Hematology , Hematopoiesis , Hemostasis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/prevention & control , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive
6.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 387-396, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483190

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulability and vascular injury, which characterize morbidity in COVID-19 disease, are frequently observed in the skin. Several pathomechanisms, such as inflammation caused by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-mediated uptake into endothelial cells or SARS-CoV-2-initiated host immune responses, contribute to microthrombus formation and the appearance of vascular skin lesions. Besides pathophysiologic mechanisms observed in the skin, this review describes the clinical appearance of cutaneous vascular lesions and their association with COVID-19 disease, including acro-ischemia, reticular lesions, and cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. Clinicians need to be aware that skin manifestations may be the only symptom in SARS-CoV-2 infection, and that inflammatory and thrombotic SARS-CoV-2-driven processes observed in multiple organs and tissues appear identically in the skin as well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin/blood supply , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Complement Activation , Cytokines/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Microvessels/immunology , Microvessels/pathology , Microvessels/physiopathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Skin/immunology , Vasculitis/etiology , Vasculitis/pathology , Vasculitis/physiopathology , Virus Internalization
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480798

ABSTRACT

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a severe condition characterized by the systemic formation of microthrombi complicated with bleeding tendency and organ dysfunction. In the last years, it represents one of the most frequent consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The pathogenesis of DIC is complex, with cross-talk between the coagulant and inflammatory pathways. The objective of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DIC model in rats. Experimental DIC was induced by continual infusion of LPS (30 mg/kg) for 4 h through the tail vein. Um-PEA (30 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before and 1 h after the start of intravenous infusion of LPS. Results showed that um-PEA reduced alteration of coagulation markers, as well as proinflammatory cytokine release in plasma and lung samples, induced by LPS infusion. Furthermore, um-PEA also has the effect of preventing the formation of fibrin deposition and lung damage. Moreover, um-PEA was able to reduce the number of mast cells (MCs) and the release of its serine proteases, which are also necessary for SARS-CoV-2 infection. These results suggest that um-PEA could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach in the management of DIC and in clinical implications associated to coagulopathy and lung dysfunction, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Ethanolamines/therapeutic use , Palmitic Acids/therapeutic use , Sepsis/complications , Amides/chemistry , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Ethanolamines/chemistry , Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mast Cells/cytology , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Palmitic Acids/chemistry , Palmitic Acids/pharmacology , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Prothrombin Time , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/pathology , Serine Proteases/metabolism
9.
Anaesthesist ; 70(2): 121-126, 2021 Feb.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453674

ABSTRACT

A 59-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital diagnosed with moderate pneumonia associated with COVID-19. Upfront treatment with hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin was started. Due to a clinical deterioration (ARDS, circulatory shock) and greatly increased inflammation markers 6 days after admission, a cytokine storm was suspected and off-label treatment with the IL­6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab was initiated. Subsequently there was a dramatic rise of D­dimers indicating pulmonary intravascular coagulopathy and respiratory insufficiency worsened. After a second dose of tocilizumab was administered severe perimyocarditis with cardiac arrhythmia, hemodynamic instability and ST elevation occurred. Shortly afterwards the patient died due to multiorgan failure. From our experience, exacerbation of COVID-19 following treatment with tocilizumab cannot be ruled out. Randomized controlled studies are necessary to further investigate the efficacy, safety and patient selection criteria for tocilizumab treatment in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Myocarditis/etiology , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Off-Label Use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency , Treatment Outcome
10.
Clin Immunol ; 232: 108852, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) non-survivors meet the criteria for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Although timely monitoring of clotting hemorrhagic development during the natural course of COVID-19 is critical for understanding pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease, however, limited data are available on the dynamic processes of inflammation/coagulopathy/fibrinolysis (ICF). METHODS: We monitored the dynamic progression of ICF in patients with moderate COVID-19. Out of 694 COVID-19 inpatients from 10 hospitals in Wenzhou, China, we selected 293 adult patients without comorbidities. These patients were divided into different daily cohorts according to the COVID-19 onset-time. Furthermore, data of 223 COVID-19 patients with comorbidities and 22 critical cases were analyzed. Retrospective data were extracted from electronic medical records. RESULTS: The virus-induced damages to pre-hospitalization patients triggered two ICF fluctuations during the 14-day course of the disease. C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and D-dimer levels increased and peaked at day 5 (D) 5 and D9 during the 1st and 2nd fluctuations, respectively. The ICF activities were higher during the 2nd fluctuation. Although 12-day medication returned high CRP concentrations to normal and blocked fibrinogen increase, the D-dimer levels remained high on days 17 ±â€¯2 and 23 ±â€¯2 days of the COVID-19 course. Notably, although the oxygenation index, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were within the normal range in critical COVID-19 patients at administration, 86% of these patients had a D-dimer level > 500 µg/L. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is linked with chronic DIC, which could be responsible for the progression of the disease. Understanding and monitoring ICF progression during COVID-19 can help clinicians in identifying the stage of the disease quickly and accurately and administering suitable treatment.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/virology , Adult , Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/metabolism , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , China , Disease Progression , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/metabolism , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Hemorrhage/etiology , Hemorrhage/pathology , Hemorrhage/virology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prothrombin Time , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16290, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354111

ABSTRACT

To reveal if coagulopathies relate to the course of COVID-19, we examined 255 patients with moderate and severe COVID-19, receiving anticoagulants and immunosuppressive drugs. Coagulopathy manifested predominantly as hypercoagulability that correlated directly with systemic inflammation, disease severity, comorbidities, and mortality risk. The prolonged clotting tests in about » of cases were associated with high levels of C-reactive protein and antiphospholipid antibodies, which impeded coagulation in vitro. Contraction of blood clots was hindered in about ½ of patients, especially in severe and fatal cases, and correlated directly with prothrombotic parameters. A decrease in platelet contractility was due to moderate thrombocytopenia in combination with platelet dysfunction. Clots with impaired contraction were porous, had a low content of compressed polyhedral erythrocytes (polyhedrocytes) and an even distribution of fibrin, suggesting that the uncompacted intravital clots are more obstructive but patients could also be prone to bleeding. The absence of consumption coagulopathy suggests the predominance of local and/or regional microthrombosis rather than disseminated intravascular coagulation. The results obtained (i) confirm the importance of hemostatic disorders in COVID-19 and their relation to systemic inflammation; (ii) justify monitoring of hemostasis, including the kinetics of blood clot contraction; (iii) substantiate the active prophylaxis of thrombotic complications in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelet Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Platelets/ultrastructure , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325684

ABSTRACT

In severe COVID-19, which is characterized by blood clots and neutrophil-platelet aggregates in the circulating blood and different tissues, an increased incidence of cardiovascular complications and venous thrombotic events has been reported. The inflammatory storm that characterizes severe infections may act as a driver capable of profoundly disrupting the complex interplay between platelets, endothelium, and leukocytes, thus contributing to the definition of COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. In this frame, P-selectin represents a key molecule expressed on endothelial cells and on activated platelets, and contributes to endothelial activation, leucocyte recruitment, rolling, and tissue migration. Briefly, we describe the current state of knowledge about P-selectin involvement in COVID-19 pathogenesis, its possible use as a severity marker and as a target for host-directed therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , COVID-19/complications , P-Selectin/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism
13.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(2): 201-206, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285654

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is the cause of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has a high case fatality rate. Most severely ill patients develop a special type of coagulopathy that had not been described before and that is now considered the main cause of death. For this reason, anticoagulant treatment has become one of the cornerstones of the treatment of this infection. However, the rate at which the evidence regarding the use of anticoagulants is generated is quite fast, and sometimes it is difficult to interpret and conflicting. After having performed an extensive review of the published literature, this proposal for the use of anticoagulant treatment is made, taking into account available resources in Mexico.


La infección por coronavirus 2 del síndrome respiratorio agudo grave (SARS-CoV-2) es la causante de la pandemia de enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), con un índice de letalidad alto. La mayoría de los pacientes graves desarrollan un tipo especial de coagulopatía no descrito hasta ahora y la cual se considera ahora la principal causa de muerte. Por esta razón, el tratamiento anticoagulante se ha convertido en una de las piedras angulares del tratamiento de esta infección. Sin embargo, la velocidad con la que se genera la evidencia respecto al uso de anticoagulantes es muy rápida y, en ocasiones difícil de interpretar y contradictoria. Luego de hacer una revisión extensa de la literatura publicada, se hace esta propuesta para el uso del tratamiento anticoagulante tomando en cuenta los recursos disponibles en México.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Algorithms , Blood Coagulation Disorders/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Mexico
14.
Expert Opin Ther Targets ; 25(6): 423-433, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281815

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Defibrotide (DF) is a polyribonucleotide with antithrombotic, pro-fibrinolytic, and anti-inflammatory effects on endothelium. These effects and the established safety of DF present DF as a strong candidate to treat viral and post-infectious syndromes involving endothelial dysfunction. AREAS COVERED: We discuss DF and other therapeutic agents that have the potential to target endothelial components of pathogenesis in viral and post-infectious syndromes. We introduce defibrotide (DF), describe its mechanisms of action, and explore its established pleiotropic effects on the endothelium. We describe the established pathophysiology of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and highlight the processes specific to COVID-19 potentially modulated by DF. We also present influenza A and viral hemorrhagic fevers, especially those caused by hantavirus, Ebola virus, and dengue virus, as viral syndromes in which DF might serve therapeutic benefit. Finally, we offer our opinion on novel treatment strategies targeting endothelial dysfunction in viral infections and their severe manifestations. EXPERT OPINION: Given the critical role of endothelial dysfunction in numerous infectious syndromes, in particular COVID-19, therapeutic pharmacology for these conditions should increasingly prioritize endothelial stabilization. Several agents with endothelial protective properties should be further studied as treatments for severe viral infections and vasculitides, especially where other therapeutic modalities have failed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Polydeoxyribonucleotides/pharmacology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Humans , Polydeoxyribonucleotides/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
15.
J Heart Lung Transplant ; 40(10): 1076-1081, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267682

ABSTRACT

While COVID-19 is best known as a respiratory infection, SARS-CoV-2 causes systemic disease manifestations including coagulopathies. Both dysregulated extracellular matrix remodeling pathways and circulating coagulation proteins are hallmarks of severe COVID-19 and often continue after the resolution of acute infection. Coagulation proteins have proven effective as biomarkers for severe disease and anticoagulants are a mainstay of COVID-19 therapeutics in hospitalized patients. While much knowledge has been gained about the role of clotting pathway activation in COVID-19, much remains to be elucidated in this complex network of signaling pathways.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Wound Healing , Humans
16.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 53(2): 153-161, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234881

ABSTRACT

Patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) due to the COVID-19 experience a high incidence (up to 43%) of venous thromboembolic events. While laboratory findings in COVID-19-associated coagulopathy (CAC) show increased D-dimer and fibrinogen levels, the abnormalities in standard coagulation tests and platelet count are minimal. Recent studies suggest contribution of fibrinolysis shutdown to this phenomenon. Endothelial injury and alteration of its antithrombotic activity can lead to micro- and macrovascular thrombosis in the lungs, occurrence of which is associated with poor clinical outcome in critically ill patients with COVID-19. Additionally, the hypercoagulability induced by activation of coagulation pathways during the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection contributes to impaired organ perfusion. This, alongside with hypoxemia, leads to multiorgan failure. Various diagnostic regimens, some of which include global assays of haemostasis, are currently being published and discussed. Numerous guidelines and recommendations of scientific societies and groups of specialists have been published. However, there is no single optimal algorithm for anticoagulation treatment and monitoring specific to the ICU patients with COVID-19. The authors have attempted to summarize the data related to CAC and thrombotic disease and develop an algorithm consistent with the latest clinical practice guideline recommendations.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Algorithms , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
17.
JCI Insight ; 6(9)2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228934

ABSTRACT

SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel viral pathogen that causes a clinical disease called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although most COVID-19 cases are asymptomatic or involve mild upper respiratory tract symptoms, a significant number of patients develop severe or critical disease. Patients with severe COVID-19 commonly present with viral pneumonia that may progress to life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with COVID-19 are also predisposed to venous and arterial thromboses that are associated with a poorer prognosis. The present study identified the emergence of a low-density inflammatory neutrophil (LDN) population expressing intermediate levels of CD16 (CD16Int) in patients with COVID-19. These cells demonstrated proinflammatory gene signatures, activated platelets, spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps, and enhanced phagocytic capacity and cytokine production. Strikingly, CD16Int neutrophils were also the major immune cells within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, exhibiting increased CXCR3 but loss of CD44 and CD38 expression. The percentage of circulating CD16Int LDNs was associated with D-dimer, ferritin, and systemic IL-6 and TNF-α levels and changed over time with altered disease status. Our data suggest that the CD16Int LDN subset contributes to COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, systemic inflammation, and ARDS. The frequency of that LDN subset in the circulation could serve as an adjunct clinical marker to monitor disease status and progression.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Female , GPI-Linked Proteins/blood , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/classification , Pandemics , Phagocytosis , Platelet Activation , Receptors, IgG/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
18.
J Hepatol ; 75(3): 647-658, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228069

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: COVID-19 is associated with liver injury and elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6). We hypothesized that IL-6 trans-signaling in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) leads to endotheliopathy (a proinflammatory and procoagulant state) and liver injury in COVID-19. METHODS: Coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were retrospectively analyzed in a subset (n = 68), followed by a larger cohort (n = 3,780) of patients with COVID-19. Liver histology from 43 patients with COVID-19 was analyzed for endotheliopathy and its relationship to liver injury. Primary human LSECs were used to establish the IL-6 trans-signaling mechanism. RESULTS: Factor VIII, fibrinogen, D-dimer, von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity/antigen (biomarkers of coagulopathy/endotheliopathy) were significantly elevated in patients with COVID-19 and liver injury (elevated ALT). IL-6 positively correlated with vWF antigen (p = 0.02), factor VIII activity (p = 0.02), and D-dimer (p <0.0001). On liver histology, patients with COVID-19 and elevated ALT had significantly increased vWF and platelet staining, supporting a link between liver injury, coagulopathy, and endotheliopathy. Intralobular neutrophils positively correlated with platelet (p <0.0001) and vWF (p <0.01) staining, and IL-6 levels positively correlated with vWF staining (p <0.01). IL-6 trans-signaling leads to increased expression of procoagulant (factor VIII, vWF) and proinflammatory factors, increased cell surface vWF (p <0.01), and increased platelet attachment in LSECs. These effects were blocked by soluble glycoprotein 130 (IL-6 trans-signaling inhibitor), the JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib, and STAT1/3 small-interfering RNA knockdown. Hepatocyte fibrinogen expression was increased by the supernatant of LSECs subjected to IL-6 trans-signaling. CONCLUSION: IL-6 trans-signaling drives the coagulopathy and hepatic endotheliopathy associated with COVID-19 and could be a possible mechanism behind liver injury in these patients. LAY SUMMARY: Patients with SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection often have liver injury, but why this occurs remains unknown. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its circulating receptor, which form a complex to induce inflammatory signals, have been observed in patients with COVID-19. This paper demonstrates that the IL-6 signaling complex causes harmful changes to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and may promote blood clotting and contribute to liver injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Interleukin-6/physiology , Liver Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Janus Kinase 1/metabolism , Nitriles , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines , Retrospective Studies , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
19.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e930667, 2021 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with a hypercoagulability state. Clinical presentation can range from asymptomatic to severe illness and mortality. Thrombotic complications in COVID-19 have been associated with mortality. The incidence of systemic hypercoagulation in COVID-19 is associated with the process of severe inflammation. The majority of severely ill patients have developed coagulopathy, and this condition is associated with poor outcomes. CASE REPORT A 72-year-old man presented with respiratory symptoms and was diagnosed with a COVID-19 infection. He presented with tachypnea, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, and 74% peripheral oxygen saturation under 15 L/min oxygen per non-rebreather mask. Initial laboratory test results showed severe hypoxemia as per blood gas analysis (pH 7.42, pCO2 23 mmHg, pO2 43 mmHg, HCO3 15 mmol/L, base deficit -9 mmol/L), with increased procalcitonin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, D-dimer, fibrinogen, creatine kinase myocardial band, and Troponin I. He subsequently developed thrombosis of the pulmonary arteries and multiple branches of the pulmonary vein despite therapeutic anticoagulation. We initiated heparin therapy (average dose 25 191 units per day, mean activated partial thromboplastin time, 64.35 seconds). Radiological investigations revealed multiple thromboses on pulmonary arteries and pulmonary veins, as well as multiple locations of brain infarction. Rescue thrombolytic therapy was given, but unfortunately, the patient died due to multiple end-organ failures. CONCLUSIONS Controlling coagulopathy, and thrombolytic therapy type and timing, are critical issues, and new strategies must be sought to lower its morbidity and mortality rates further.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy
20.
Cell Biol Int ; 45(9): 1832-1850, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212726

ABSTRACT

December 2019 will never be forgotten in the history of medicine when an outbreak of pneumonia of unknown etiology in Wuhan, China sooner or later prompted the World Health Organization to issue a public health warning emergency. This is not the first nor will it be the last time that a member of ß-coronaviruses (CoVs) is waging a full-scale war against human health. Notwithstanding the fact that pneumonia is the primary symptom of the novel coronavirus (2019nCoV; designated as SARS-CoV-2), the emergence of severe disease mainly due to the injury of nonpulmonary organs at the shadow of coagulopathy leaves no choice, in some cases, rather than a dreadful death. Multiple casual factors such as inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet and complement activation, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system derangement, and hypoxemia play a major role in the pathogenesis of coagulopathy in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Due to the undeniable role of coagulation dysfunction in the initiation of several complications, assessment of coagulation parameters and the platelet count would be beneficial in early diagnosis and also timely prediction of disease severity. Although low-molecular-weight heparin is considered as the first-line of treatment in COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, several possible therapeutic options have also been proposed for better management of the disease. In conclusion, this review would help us to gain insight into the pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and laboratory findings associated with COVID-19 coagulopathy and would summarize management strategies to alleviate coagulopathy-related complications.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/cytology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Thromboembolism/etiology
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