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2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 72(22): 601-605, 2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237470

ABSTRACT

Changes in testing behaviors and reporting requirements have hampered the ability to estimate the U.S. SARS-CoV-2 incidence (1). Hybrid immunity (immunity derived from both previous infection and vaccination) has been reported to provide better protection than that from infection or vaccination alone (2). To estimate the incidence of infection and the prevalence of infection- or vaccination-induced antibodies (or both), data from a nationwide, longitudinal cohort of blood donors were analyzed. During the second quarter of 2021 (April-June), an estimated 68.4% of persons aged ≥16 years had infection- or vaccination-induced SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, including 47.5% from vaccination alone, 12.0% from infection alone, and 8.9% from both. By the third quarter of 2022 (July-September), 96.4% had SARS-CoV-2 antibodies from previous infection or vaccination, including 22.6% from infection alone and 26.1% from vaccination alone; 47.7% had hybrid immunity. Prevalence of hybrid immunity was lowest among persons aged ≥65 years (36.9%), the group with the highest risk for severe disease if infected, and was highest among those aged 16-29 years (59.6%). Low prevalence of infection-induced and hybrid immunity among older adults reflects the success of public health infection prevention efforts while also highlighting the importance of older adults staying up to date with recommended COVID-19 vaccination, including at least 1 bivalent dose.*,†.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Blood Donors , Incidence , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Antibodies, Viral , Vaccination
3.
Transfusion ; 63(7): 1354-1365, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The true burden of COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries remains poorly characterized, especially in Africa. Even prior to the availability of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, countries in Africa had lower numbers of reported COVID-19 related hospitalizations and deaths than other regions globally. METHODS: Ugandan blood donors were evaluated between October 2019 and April 2022 for IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), and five variants of the S protein using multiplexed electrochemiluminescence immunoassays (MesoScale Diagnostics, Rockville, MD). Seropositivity for N and S was assigned using manufacturer-provided cutoffs and trends in seroprevalence were estimated by quarter. Statistically significant associations between N and S antibody seropositivity and donor characteristics in November-December 2021 were assessed by chi-square tests. RESULTS: A total of 5393 blood unit samples from donors were evaluated. N and S seropositivity increased throughout the pandemic to 82.6% in January-April 2022. Among seropositive individuals, N and S antibody levels increased ≥9-fold over the study period. In November-December 2021, seropositivity to N and S antibody was higher among repeat donors (61.3%) compared with new donors (55.1%; p = .043) and among donors from Kampala (capital city of Uganda) compared with rural regions (p = .007). Seropositivity to S antibody was significantly lower among HIV-seropositive individuals (58.8% vs. 84.9%; p = .009). CONCLUSIONS: Despite previously reported low numbers of COVID-19 cases and related deaths in Uganda, high SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and increasing antibody levels among blood donors indicated that the country experienced high levels of infection over the course of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Humans , Uganda/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Seroepidemiologic Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Antibodies, Viral
4.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 29(7): 1479-1481, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235506

ABSTRACT

We evaluated SARS-CoV-2 antibody response in voluntary blood donors in Italy at different timepoints. Immediately after lockdown easing, 908/25,657 donors (3.5%) had low IgG titers against nucleocapsid. In the next 2 years, titers increased despite few COVID-19 symptoms. On multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis was associated with reduced risk for symptomatic COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Italy/epidemiology , Antibodies, Viral
5.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285737, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325525

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 virus infection has imposed a significant healthcare burden globally. To contain its spread and decrease infection-related mortality, several vaccines have been deployed worldwide in the past 3 years. We conducted a cross-sectional seroprevalence study to assess the immune response against the virus among blood donors at a tertiary care hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. From December 2021 to March 2022, total of 1,520 participants were enrolled, and their past history of SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination was recorded. Two serology test, namely, quantitative IgG spike protein (IgGSP) and qualitative IgG nucleocapsid antibody (IgGNC) were performed. The median age of study participants was 40 years (IQR 30-48) and 833 (54.8%) were men. Vaccine uptake was reported in 1,500 donors (98.7%) and 84 (5.5%) reported the past infection history. IgGNC was detected in 46/84 donors with the past infection history (54.8%) and in 36 out of the rest 1,436 (2.5%) with no past history. IgGSP positivity was observed in 1484 donors (97.6%). When compared to unvaccinated donors (n = 20), IgGSP level was higher in the donors who had received one vaccine dose (p< 0.001) and these antibody levels increased significantly among those with 3rd and 4th vaccine doses. Factors associated with low IgGSP (lowest quartile) by multivariate analysis included: no past infection history, homologous vaccination, < 3 vaccine doses, and > 90 days duration since last vaccination. In conclusion, vaccine uptake among our study donors was high (98.7%) and IgGSP antibody was observed in nearly all the vaccinated donors (97.6%). Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, use of heterologous vaccination, vaccines ≥ 3 doses, and duration of the last vaccination >90 days affected IgGSP levels. Use of serological assays were found beneficial in the evaluation and differentiation of immune response to vaccination, and natural infection including the identification of previous asymptomatic infections.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , Thailand/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Seroepidemiologic Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Antibodies, Viral , Vaccination , Immunoglobulin G
6.
J Epidemiol Glob Health ; 13(2): 266-278, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318916

ABSTRACT

Over a period of about 9 months, we conducted three serosurveys in the two major cities of Cameroon to determine the prevalence of SARS-COV-2 antibodies and to identify factors associated with seropositivity in each survey. We conducted three independent cross-sectional serosurveys of adult blood donors at the Central Hospital in Yaoundé (CHY), the Jamot Hospital in Yaoundé (JHY) and at the Laquintinie Hospital in Douala (LHD) who consented in writing to participate. Before blood sampling, a short questionnaire was administered to participants to collect their sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. We included a total of 743, 1202, and 1501 participants in the first (January 25-February 15, 2021), second (May 03-28, 2021), and third (November 29-December 31, 2021) surveys, respectively. The adjusted seroprevalence increased from 66.3% (95% CrI 61.1-71.3) in the first survey to 87.2% (95% CrI 84.0-90.0) in the second survey, and 98.4% (95% CrI 96.8-99.7) in the third survey. In the first survey, study site, participant occupation, and comorbid conditions were associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity, whereas only study site remained associated in the second survey. None of the factors studied was significantly associated with seropositivity in the third survey. Together, the data suggest a rapid initial spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the study population, independent of the sociodemographic parameters assessed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Cities/epidemiology , Blood Donors , Cameroon/epidemiology , Antibodies, Viral
7.
Transfusion ; 63(6): 1184-1194, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315568

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Japan, "Blood Donation Promotion 2025," a blood donation target, was established based on a predicted blood donation rate of 5.7% in 2025, which was calculated by the Blood Donation Promotion Study Group (BD research group) of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare using nationwide blood donation data through 2018. However, COVID-19 since 2020 may affect the blood donation rate in Japan. METHOD: Data from 75.5 million blood donations from 2006 to 2020 was used. The age-period-cohort model (APC model) was applied to estimate age, period, and birth cohort factors on blood donation rate and to predict the age-specific blood donation rates from 2021 to 2035. RESULTS: The APC model was highly reproducible for blood donation rates (modified R2 = 0.99). The blood donation rate in 2020 was 6.0% (5.04 million), an increase compared to 2019. Comparing this study with the BD research group, the predicted blood donation rates in 2025 for those 16-19 years old and in 20s are lower (4.8% vs. 5.2% and 5.3% vs. 5.5%) but those among 50s and 60s are higher (7.9% vs. 7.5% and 4.2% vs. 3.9%, respectively). DISCUSSION: The number of blood donations in 2020 increased despite COVID-19 and it proved that the blood donation promotion was effective. The different age-specific blood donation rates between our study and the report of BD research group infers the effect of COVID-19 on blood donation were differed by age and suggested the need for different approaches to blood donation promotion by generation.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Blood Donation , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies
8.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 29(7): 1323-1329, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315266

ABSTRACT

We evaluated antibodies to the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2 in a large cohort of blood donors in the United States who were recently infected with the virus. Antibodies to the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2 indicate previous infection but are subject to waning, potentially affecting epidemiologic studies. We longitudinally evaluated a cohort of 19,323 blood donors who had evidence of recent infection by using a widely available serologic test to determine the dynamics of such waning. We analyzed overall signal-to-cutoff values for 48,330 donations (average 2.5 donations/person) that had an average observation period of 102 days. The observed peak signal-to-cutoff value varied widely, but the waning rate was consistent across the range, with a half-life of 122 days. Within the cohort, only 0.75% of persons became seronegative. Factors predictive of higher peak values and longer time to seroreversion included increasing age, male sex, higher body mass index, and non-Caucasian race.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Male , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Donors , Antibodies, Viral , Nucleocapsid , Nucleocapsid Proteins , Demography , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
9.
Euro Surveill ; 28(19)2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315205

ABSTRACT

BackgroundIn 2020, Wales experienced some of the highest rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Europe. We set up a serosurveillance scheme using residual samples from blood donations to inform the pandemic response in Wales.AimTo identify changes in SARS-CoV-2 antibody seroprevalence in Wales by time, demography and location.MethodsResidual samples from blood donations made in Wales between 29 June 2020 and 20 November 2022 were tested for antibodies to the nucleocapsid antigen (anti-N) of SARS-CoV-2, resulting from natural infection. Donations made between 12 April 2021 and 20 November 2022 were also tested for antibodies to the spike antigen (anti-S) occurring as a result of natural infection and vaccination.ResultsAge-standardised seroprevalence of anti-N antibodies in donors remained stable (4.4-5.5%) until November 2020 before increasing to 16.7% by February 2021. Trends remained steady until November 2021 before increasing, peaking in November 2022 (80.2%). For anti-S, seroprevalence increased from 67.1% to 98.6% between May and September 2021, then remained above 99%. Anti-N seroprevalence was highest in younger donors and in donors living in urban South Wales. In contrast, seroprevalence of anti-S was highest in older donors and was similar across regions. No significant difference was observed by sex. Seroprevalence of anti-N antibodies was higher in Black, Asian and other minority ethnicities (self-reported) compared with White donors, with the converse observed for anti-S antibodies.ConclusionWe successfully set up long-term serological surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 using residual samples from blood donations, demonstrating variation based on age, ethnicity and location.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ethnicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Wales/epidemiology
10.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e068472, 2023 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301905

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The SeMaCo study (Serologische Untersuchungen bei Blutspendern des Großraums Magdeburg auf Antikörper gegen SARS-CoV-2), a prospective, longitudinal cohort study with four survey phases spanning 3-5 months each over a period of 22 months, extends the spectrum of seroepidemiological studies in Germany. We present here a careful characterisation of the initial survey phase of the cohort to provide baseline data on infection incidence and obtained from questionnaires, focussing in particular on the attitude towards COVID-19 vaccinations, the vaccination success and the vaccination acceptance. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2195 individual blood donors from the donor pool of the blood donation service of the University Hospital Magdeburg were enrolled in the initial survey phase from 20 January 2021 to 30 April 2021. 2138 participants gave sociodemographic/contact data (51.7% male, mean age 44 years) and 2082 participants answered the vaccination questionnaire. FINDINGS TO DATE: Out of 2195 participants with antibody results, 1909 (87.0%) were antibody negative. The remaining 286 subjects (13.0%) were either antibody-positive and vaccinated (160/286; 55.9%) or antibody-positive without vaccination information (17/286; 5.9%) or antibody-positive and unvaccinated (109/286; 38.1%). The latter result reflects the rate of true or highly probable SARS-CoV-2 infections in our initial study cohort. FUTURE PLANS: The study primarily aims to measure the prevalence and long-term kinetics of IgG-antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Including the baseline, the study foresees four survey periods of 3-4 months each. At each visit, we will assess the blood donors' attitude towards vaccination, the antibody response following vaccination and/or infection, as well as undesired vaccination effects. We aim to test the same participants during the survey periods by repeated invitations for blood donation to ensure a long-term (follow-up) in as many study participants as possible. After the four survey phases, a longitudinal data set will be created that reflects the course of the antibody levels/frequencies as well as the infection and vaccination incidence. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00023263.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Adult , Female , Cohort Studies , Longitudinal Studies , Prospective Studies , Seroepidemiologic Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Immunoglobulin G , Antibodies, Viral , Vaccination
11.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284975, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297019

ABSTRACT

Naturally occurring antibodies against ABO antigens present in human sera have been shown to neutralize ABO-expressing HIV in vitro. We investigated associations between ABO and RhD blood groups and HIV infection among blood donors from all blood collection centers in eight of South Africa's nine provinces. Whole blood donations collected from first time donors between January 2012 and September 2016 were tested for HIV RNA by nucleic acid testing and HIV antibody using third generation serology assays. ABO and RhD blood types were determined using automated technology. Odds ratios for the association between HIV positivity and ABO and RhD phenotypes were calculated using multivariable logistic regression analysis. We analyzed 515,945 first time blood donors and the overall HIV prevalence was 1.12% (n = 5790). After multivariable adjustment, HIV infection was weakly associated with RhD positive phenotype (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.00-1.33) but not with ABO blood group. The observed association with RhD positive phenotype was marginal and likely due to residual confounding by racial group but could serve to generate hypotheses for further studies.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , HIV-1 , Humans , ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Antigens , Blood Donors , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV-1/genetics
13.
Curr Oncol ; 30(3): 3549-3556, 2023 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic profoundly influenced unrelated donor (UD) allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections. Changes included efforts to minimize COVID-19 exposure to donors and cryopreservation of products. The extent to which the efficacy and safety of PBSC donations were affected by the pandemic is unknown. METHODS: Prospective cohort analysis of PBSC collections comparing pre-pandemic (01 April 2019-14 March 2020) and pandemic (15 March 2020-31 March 2022) eras. RESULTS: Of a total of 291 PBSC collections, cryopreservation was undertaken in 71.4% of pandemic donations compared to 1.1% pre-pandemic. The mean requested CD34+ cell dose/kg increased from 4.9 ± 0.2 × 106 pre-pandemic to 5.4 ± 0.1 × 106 during the pandemic. Despite this increased demand, the proportion of collections that met or exceeded the requested cell dose did not change, and the mean CD34+ cell doses collected (8.9 ± 0.5 × 106 pre-pandemic vs. 9.7 ± 0.4 × 106 during the pandemic) remained above requested targets. Central-line placements were more frequent, and severe adverse events in donors increased during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Cryopreservation of UD PBSC products increased during the pandemic. In association with this, requested cell doses for PBSC collections increased. Collection targets were met or exceeded at the same frequency, signaling high donor and collection center commitment. This was at the expense of increased donor or product-related severe adverse events. We highlight the need for heightened vigilance about donor safety as demands on donors have increased since the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Pandemics , Unrelated Donors , Prospective Studies , Blood Donors
14.
Transfusion ; 63(4): 703-710, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255828

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early in the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, many blood collection organizations (BCOs) were asked to collect and distribute COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) as a potential treatment for this new virus and resulting disease. However, recruiting CCP donors presented unique challenges for BCOs, as there were few recovered patients at this time, and like the general population, most potential CCP donors had no blood donation experience. Thus, many CCP donors were new donors, and their donation motivations were unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Donors who gave CCP at least once between April 27th and September 15th, 2020, were emailed a link to an online survey regarding their experience with COVID-19 and their motivations for donating CCP and blood. RESULTS: Of the 14,225 invitations sent, 3471 donors responded (24.4%). Most donors had never donated blood before (n = 1406), followed by lapsed donors (n = 1050), and recent donors (n = 951). There was a significant relationship between self-reported donation experience and fear of CCP donation (X2  = 119.2, p < .001). Motivations ranked "very important" by responding donors were wanting to help someone in need, a feeling of responsibility, and feeling a duty to donate. Donors with more severe disease were more likely to respond with feelings of a sense of duty to donate CCP (Χ2  = 8.078, p = .044) or altruism (Χ2  = 8.580, p = .035). CONCLUSIONS: Overwhelmingly, altruism and a sense of duty and responsibility were the reasons that CCP donors decided to donate. These insights can be useful for motivating donors for specialized donation programs or if wide scale CCP recruitment is needed in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Motivation , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 Serotherapy , Tissue Donors , Blood Donors
16.
BMJ Open ; 13(2): e068803, 2023 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260435

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The long-term humoral immunity to COVID-19 is not well understood owing to the continuous emergence of new variants of concern, the evolving vaccine-induced and infection-induced immunity, and the limited duration of follow-up in previous studies. As the sole blood service in Québec (Canada), Héma-Québec established a COVID-19-focused biobank ('PlasCoV') in April 2021. PARTICIPANTS: As of January 2022, the biobank included 86 483 plasma samples from 15 502 regular donors (age range=18-84 years, females=49.7%), for an average of 5.6 donations per donor. Nearly two-thirds (65.6%) of biobank donors made at least two donations, with many donors having provided samples prevaccination and postvaccination (3061 (19.7%)) or preinfection and postinfection (131 (0.8%)), thus allowing for longitudinal studies on vaccine-induced and infection-induced immunity. FINDINGS TO DATE: A study that used PlasCoV samples revealed that previously infected individuals who received a single dose of the BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine exhibited the strongest immune response. By contrast, SARS-CoV-2-naïve individuals required two vaccine doses to produce a maximal immune response. Furthermore, the results of a four-phase seroprevalence study indicated that the antinucleocapsid (N) response wanes rapidly, so that up to one-third of previously infected donors were seronegative for anti-N. FUTURE PLANS: Donations from individuals who consented to participate before 1 October 2022 will be collected up until 31 March 2023. This plasma biobank will facilitate the conduct of longitudinal studies on COVID-19 immunity, thus helping to provide valuable insights into the anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response and its persistence, and the effects of vaccination and variants on the specificity of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Biological Specimen Banks , Blood Donors , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Vaccination , Male
17.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1138430, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266525

ABSTRACT

Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a decrease in the number of blood donors worldwide, posing a global problem. Therefore, this study investigates people who have continuously participated in blood donation during the COVID-19 pandemic and collects basic information as a reference for maintaining stable amounts of blood during future pandemics. Methods: The participants of this study were selected from the population of South Korea through stratified sampling considering region and age distributions. Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, the participants were recruited online through Embrain, an online research and survey company, from June 1 to June 28, 2021. Data were collected from a total of 1,043 participants and used in the study. Results: The results of this study showed that there was a difference between the donors group and non-donors group in factors such as donation attitude (F = 73.342, p < 0.001), donation knowledge (F = 6.530, p < 0.01), and preventive health behavior (F = 12.352, p < 0.001). Overall, blood donors showed favorable attitude toward and considerable knowledge of blood donation as well as a high level of preventive health behavior. The environment most preferred by people who participated in blood donation during the COVID-19 pandemic was "going with family to a blood donation center that gives out free gifts in a region far away with no confirmed cases," which showed the highest utility (utility = 0.734). Conclusion: Even during pandemics, donation attitude, donation knowledge, and preventive health behavior can serve as key factors affecting participation in blood donation. Additionally, blood donation centers that donors can visit with their families represent a favorable environment for the promotion of blood donation during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , East Asian People , Attitude
18.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 62(3): 103687, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265350

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Since 2020, the novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19) has spread globally. A few studies have investigated the safety of COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) apheresis from COVID-19. This study was the first retrospective observational study of CCP in Japan. METHODS: We recruit donors from April 2020 to November 2021 and plasmapheresis in our center (NCGM: national center for global health and medicine). We set the primary endpoint as the Donors Adverse Event (DAE) occurrence at the time of the CCP collection. Variable selection was used to explore the determinants of DAE. RESULTS: Mean and SD age was 50.5 (10.6) years old. Seventy-three (42.2 %) were female, and 87 (33.3 %) were multiple-times donors. Twelve (6.97 % by donors and 4.6 % in total collections) adverse events occurred. The DAEs were VVR (Vaso Vagal Reaction), paresthesia, hypotension, agitation, dizziness, malaise, and hearing impairment/paresthesia. Half of them were VVR during apheresis. DAE occurred only in first-time donors and more in severe illnesses such as using ventilation and ECMO. From the donor characteristics and variable selection, the risk factors are as follows: younger age, female, the severity of disease at the time of the disease, and lower SBP before initiation. Our DAE incidence did not differ from previous studies. DAEs were more likely to occur in CCP apheresis than in healthy donors. CONCLUSION: We confirm the safety of CCP apheresis in this study, although DAEs were more than healthy donors. More caution should be exercised in the plasma collection for future outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Removal , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/etiology , Japan/epidemiology , Paresthesia/etiology , COVID-19 Serotherapy , Blood Component Removal/adverse effects , Blood Donors , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects
19.
Am J Hematol ; 97(12): E454-E456, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264258

ABSTRACT

Issues in implementing cell-free DNA cancer screening tests in blood donors.


Subject(s)
Cell-Free Nucleic Acids , Neoplasms , Humans , Blood Donors , Early Detection of Cancer , Liquid Biopsy , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/genetics
20.
Transfusion ; 63(3): 552-563, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285107

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated low first-time donor return rates (DRR) following catastrophic events. Little is known, however, about the influence of demographic factors on the DRR of first-time donors during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the unique motivation of COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) donors as compared to non-CCP donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirteen blood collection organizations submitted deidentified data from first-time CCP and non-CCP donors returning for regular (non-CCP) donations during the pandemic. DRR was calculated as frequencies. Demographic factors associated with returning donors: race/ethnicity, gender, and generation (Gen Z: 19-24, Millennial: 25-40, Gen X: 41-56, and Boomer: ≥57 years old), within the CCP and non-CCP first-time cohorts were compared using chi-square test at p < .05 statistical significance. RESULTS: From March 2020 through December 2021, there were a total of 44,274 first-time CCP and 980,201 first-time non-CCP donors. DRR were 14.6% (range 11.9%-43.3%) and 46.6% (range 10.0%-76.9%) for CCP and non-CCP cohorts, respectively. Age over 40 years (Gen X and Boomers), female gender, and White race were each associated with higher return in both donor cohorts (p < .001). For the non-CCP return donor cohort, the Millennial and Boomers were comparable. CONCLUSION: The findings demonstrate differences in returning donor trends between the two donor cohorts. The motivation of a first-time CCP donor may be different than that of a non-CCP donor. Further study to improve first-time donor engagement would be worthwhile to expand the donor base with a focus on blood donor diversity emphasizing engagement of underrepresented minorities and younger donors.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Serotherapy , Ethnicity
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