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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 834988, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817941

ABSTRACT

Patients with COVID-19 present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Thromboembolic events constitute a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. Severe COVID-19 has been associated with hyperinflammation and pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Platelets are important mediators and sensors of inflammation and are directly affected by cardiovascular stressors. In this report, we found that platelets from severely ill, hospitalized COVID-19 patients exhibited higher basal levels of activation measured by P-selectin surface expression and had poor functional reserve upon in vitro stimulation. To investigate this question in more detail, we developed an assay to assess the capacity of plasma from COVID-19 patients to activate platelets from healthy donors. Platelet activation was a common feature of plasma from COVID-19 patients and correlated with key measures of clinical outcome including kidney and liver injury, and APACHEIII scores. Further, we identified ferritin as a pivotal clinical marker associated with platelet hyperactivation. The COVID-19 plasma-mediated effect on control platelets was highest for patients that subsequently developed inpatient thrombotic events. Proteomic analysis of plasma from COVID-19 patients identified key mediators of inflammation and cardiovascular disease that positively correlated with in vitro platelet activation. Mechanistically, blocking the signaling of the FcγRIIa-Syk and C5a-C5aR pathways on platelets, using antibody-mediated neutralization, IgG depletion or the Syk inhibitor fostamatinib, reversed this hyperactivity driven by COVID-19 plasma and prevented platelet aggregation in endothelial microfluidic chamber conditions. These data identified these potentially actionable pathways as central for platelet activation and/or vascular complications and clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients. In conclusion, we reveal a key role of platelet-mediated immunothrombosis in COVID-19 and identify distinct, clinically relevant, targetable signaling pathways that mediate this effect.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Complement C5a/metabolism , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thromboembolism/immunology , Adult , Aminopyridines/pharmacology , Cells, Cultured , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Morpholines/pharmacology , Platelet Activation , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction , Syk Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors
2.
Blood ; 139(10): 1564-1574, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736325

ABSTRACT

Cases of de novo immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), including a fatality, following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in previously healthy recipients led to studying its impact in preexisting ITP. In this study, 4 data sources were analyzed: the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) for cases of de novo ITP; a 10-center retrospective study of adults with preexisting ITP receiving SARS-CoV-2 vaccination; and surveys distributed by the Platelet Disorder Support Association (PDSA) and the United Kingdom (UK) ITP Support Association. Seventy-seven de novo ITP cases were identified in VAERS, presenting with median platelet count of 3 [1-9] ×109/L approximately 1 week postvaccination. Of 28 patients with available data, 26 responded to treatment with corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and/or platelet transfusions. Among 117 patients with preexisting ITP who received a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, 19 experienced an ITP exacerbation (any of: ≥50% decline in platelet count, nadir platelet count <30 × 109/L with >20% decrease from baseline, and/or use of rescue therapy) following the first dose and 14 of 70 after a second dose. Splenectomized persons and those who received 5 or more prior lines of therapy were at highest risk of ITP exacerbation. Fifteen patients received and responded to rescue treatment. In surveys of both 57 PDSA and 43 UK patients with ITP, prior splenectomy was associated with worsened thrombocytopenia. ITP may worsen in preexisting ITP or be identified de novo post-SARS-CoV2 vaccination; both situations responded well to treatment. Proactive monitoring of patients with known ITP, especially those postsplenectomy and with more refractory disease, is indicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/epidemiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Splenectomy , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 33(2): 259-278, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650730

ABSTRACT

Kidney disease is a known risk factor for poor outcomes of COVID-19 and many other serious infections. Conversely, infection is the second most common cause of death in patients with kidney disease. However, little is known about the underlying secondary immunodeficiency related to kidney disease (SIDKD). In contrast to cardiovascular disease related to kidney disease, which has triggered countless epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental research activities or interventional trials, investments in tracing, understanding, and therapeutically targeting SIDKD have been sparse. As a call for more awareness of SIDKD as an imminent unmet medical need that requires rigorous research activities at all levels, we review the epidemiology of SIDKD and the numerous aspects of the abnormal immunophenotype of patients with kidney disease. We propose a definition of SIDKD and discuss the pathogenic mechanisms of SIDKD known thus far, including more recent insights into the unexpected immunoregulatory roles of elevated levels of FGF23 and hyperuricemia and shifts in the secretome of the intestinal microbiota in kidney disease. As an ultimate goal, we should aim to develop therapeutics that can reduce mortality due to infections in patients with kidney disease by normalizing host defense to pathogens and immune responses to vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/etiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Adaptive Immunity , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/immunology , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/prevention & control , Immunophenotyping , Models, Immunological , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/immunology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroconversion
5.
J Thromb Haemost ; 20(4): 961-974, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A rapid immune response is critical to ensure effective protection against COVID-19. Platelets are first-line sentinels of the vascular system able to rapidly alert and stimulate the immune system. However, their role in the immune response to vaccines is not known. OBJECTIVE: To identify features of the platelet-immune crosstalk that would provide an early readout of vaccine efficacy in adults who received the mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine (BNT162b2). METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 11 young healthy volunteers (54% females, median age: 28 years) who received two doses of BNT162b2, 21 days apart, and we studied their platelet and immune response before and after each dose of the vaccine (3 and 10 ± 2 days post-injection), in relation to the kinetics of the humoral response. RESULTS: Participants achieving an effective level of neutralizing antibodies before the second dose of the vaccine (fast responders) had a higher leukocyte count, mounted a rapid cytokine response that incremented further after the second dose, and an elevated platelet turnover that ensured platelet count stability. Their circulating platelets were not more reactive but expressed lower surface levels of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-coupled receptor CD31 (PECAM-1) compared to slow responders, and formed specific platelet-leukocyte aggregates, with B cells, just 3 days after the first dose, and with non-classical monocytes and eosinophils. CONCLUSION: We identified features of the platelet-immune crosstalk that are associated with the development of a rapid humoral response to an mRNA-based vaccine (BNT162b2) and that could be exploited as early biomarkers of vaccine efficacy.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19 , Immunity, Humoral , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Virol J ; 18(1): 211, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 virus is the causing agent of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) characterized by a huge pro-inflammatory response and coagulation disorders that may lead to for its severe forms, in organ failure or even death. As major players of thrombo-inflammation, platelets release large amounts of immunomodulatory molecules and regulate leukocyte and endothelial activity, which are both altered in COVID-19. Altogether, this makes platelets a very likely actor of the thrombo-inflammatory complications of COVID-19. Thus, we propose to identify a platelet inflammatory signature of severe COVID-19 specifically modulated throughout the course of the disease. METHODS: Luminex technology and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to assess plasma levels of platelet inflammatory markers in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection on admission and for 14 days afterwards. RESULTS: In accordance with the observations of other teams, we evidence that the plasma levels of the platelet soluble (s)CD40L is significantly elevated in the early stages of the disease. Interestingly we observe that the plasma level of sCD40L decreases overtime while that of sCD62P increases significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that there is a platelet signature of inflammatory response to SARS-COv-2 infection which varies overtime and could serve as monitoring biomarkers of patient inflammatory state. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: 2020-A01100-39; title: Human Ab Response & immunoMONItoring of COVID-19 Patients, registration date: 05/25/2020; URL of the registry: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/history/NCT04373200?V_5=View .


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19 , Inflammation , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
7.
J Extracell Vesicles ; 10(14): e12173, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544291

ABSTRACT

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 is associated with thromboinflammation, involving thrombotic and inflammatory responses, in many COVID-19 patients. In addition, immune dysfunction occurs in patients characterised by T cell exhaustion and severe lymphopenia. We investigated the distribution of phosphatidylserine (PS), a marker of dying cells, activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles (PMP), during the clinical course of COVID-19. We found an unexpectedly high amount of blood cells loaded with PS+ PMPs for weeks after the initial COVID-19 diagnosis. Elevated frequencies of PS+ PMP+ PBMCs correlated strongly with increasing disease severity. As a marker, PS outperformed established laboratory markers for inflammation, leucocyte composition and coagulation, currently used for COVID-19 clinical scoring. PS+ PMPs preferentially bound to CD8+ T cells with gene expression signatures of proliferating effector rather than memory T cells. As PS+ PMPs carried programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), they may affect T cell expansion or function. Our data provide a novel marker for disease severity and show that PS, which can trigger the blood coagulation cascade, the complement system, and inflammation, resides on activated immune cells. Therefore, PS may serve as a beacon to attract thromboinflammatory processes towards lymphocytes and cause immune dysfunction in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Phosphatidylserines/blood , Adult , Blood Platelets/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cell-Derived Microparticles/metabolism , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Platelet Membrane Glycoprotein IIb , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome
8.
Blood ; 138(16): 1481-1489, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484294

ABSTRACT

A subset of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) become critically ill, suffering from severe respiratory problems and also increased rates of thrombosis. The causes of thrombosis in severely ill patients with COVID-19 are still emerging, but the coincidence of critical illness with the timing of the onset of adaptive immunity could implicate an excessive immune response. We hypothesized that platelets might be susceptible to activation by anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (anti-SARS-CoV-2) antibodies and might contribute to thrombosis. We found that immune complexes containing recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and anti-spike immunoglobulin G enhanced platelet-mediated thrombosis on von Willebrand factor in vitro, but only when the glycosylation state of the Fc domain was modified to correspond with the aberrant glycosylation previously identified in patients with severe COVID-19. Furthermore, we found that activation was dependent on FcγRIIA, and we provide in vitro evidence that this pathogenic platelet activation can be counteracted by the therapeutic small molecules R406 (fostamatinib) and ibrutinib, which inhibit tyrosine kinases Syk and Btk, respectively, or by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigen-Antibody Complex/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , von Willebrand Factor/genetics
9.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 379-385, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483188

ABSTRACT

In 2019 first reports about a new human coronavirus emerged, which causes common cold symptoms as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The virus was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and severe thrombotic events including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and microthrombi emerged as additional symptoms. Heart failure, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and stroke have also been observed. As main mediator of thrombus formation, platelets became one of the key aspects in SARS-CoV-2 research. Platelets may also directly interact with SARS-CoV-2 and have been shown to carry the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Platelets can also facilitate the virus uptake by secretion of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase furin. Cleavage of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein by furin enhances binding capabilities and virus entry into various cell types. In COVID-19 patients, platelet count differs between mild and serious infections. Patients with mild symptoms have a slightly increased platelet count, whereas thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of severe COVID-19 infections. Low platelet count can be attributed to platelet apoptosis and the incorporation of platelets into microthrombi (peripheral consumption) and severe thrombotic events. The observed excessive formation of thrombi is due to hyperactivation of platelets caused by the infection. Various factors have been suggested in the activation of platelets in COVID-19, such as hypoxia, vessel damage, inflammatory factors, NETosis, SARS-CoV-2 interaction, autoimmune reactions, and autocrine activation. COVID-19 does alter chemokine and cytokine plasma concentrations. Platelet chemokine profiles are altered in COVID-19 and contribute to the described chemokine storms observed in severely ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokines/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
10.
Blood ; 139(10): 1564-1574, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443789

ABSTRACT

Cases of de novo immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), including a fatality, following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in previously healthy recipients led to studying its impact in preexisting ITP. In this study, 4 data sources were analyzed: the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) for cases of de novo ITP; a 10-center retrospective study of adults with preexisting ITP receiving SARS-CoV-2 vaccination; and surveys distributed by the Platelet Disorder Support Association (PDSA) and the United Kingdom (UK) ITP Support Association. Seventy-seven de novo ITP cases were identified in VAERS, presenting with median platelet count of 3 [1-9] ×109/L approximately 1 week postvaccination. Of 28 patients with available data, 26 responded to treatment with corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and/or platelet transfusions. Among 117 patients with preexisting ITP who received a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, 19 experienced an ITP exacerbation (any of: ≥50% decline in platelet count, nadir platelet count <30 × 109/L with >20% decrease from baseline, and/or use of rescue therapy) following the first dose and 14 of 70 after a second dose. Splenectomized persons and those who received 5 or more prior lines of therapy were at highest risk of ITP exacerbation. Fifteen patients received and responded to rescue treatment. In surveys of both 57 PDSA and 43 UK patients with ITP, prior splenectomy was associated with worsened thrombocytopenia. ITP may worsen in preexisting ITP or be identified de novo post-SARS-CoV2 vaccination; both situations responded well to treatment. Proactive monitoring of patients with known ITP, especially those postsplenectomy and with more refractory disease, is indicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/epidemiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Splenectomy , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409707

ABSTRACT

Global data correlate severe vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, further suggesting the presence of a hypercoagulable state in severe COVID-19 patients, which could promote thrombosis in the lungs and in other organs. The feedback loop between COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and vitamin D also involves platelets (PLTs), since vitamin D deficiency stimulates PLT activation and aggregation and increases fibrinolysis and thrombosis. Vitamin D and PLTs share and play specific roles not only in coagulation and thrombosis but also during inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and immune response. Additionally, another 'fil rouge' between vitamin D and PLTs is represented by their role in mineral metabolism and bone health, since vitamin D deficiency, low PLT count, and altered PLT-related parameters are linked to abnormal bone remodeling in certain pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis (OP). Hence, it is possible to speculate that severe COVID-19 patients are characterized by the presence of several predisposing factors to bone fragility and OP that may be monitored to avoid potential complications. Here, we hypothesize different pervasive actions of vitamin D and PLT association in COVID-19, also allowing for potential preliminary information on bone health status during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Osteoporosis/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Bone Remodeling/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Feedback, Physiological , Humans , Osteoporosis/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 728513, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394762

ABSTRACT

VITT is a rare, life-threatening syndrome characterized by thrombotic symptoms in combination with thrombocytopenia, which may occur in individuals receiving the first administration of adenoviral non replicating vectors (AVV) anti Covid19 vaccines. Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is characterized by high levels of serum IgG that bind PF4/polyanion complexes, thus triggering platelet activation. Therefore, identification of the fine pathophysiological mechanism by which vaccine components trigger platelet activation is mandatory. Herein, we propose a multistep mechanism involving both the AVV and the neo-synthetized Spike protein. The former can: i) spread rapidly into blood stream, ii), promote the early production of high levels of IL-6, iii) interact with erythrocytes, platelets, mast cells and endothelia, iv) favor the presence of extracellular DNA at the site of injection, v) activate platelets and mast cells to release PF4 and heparin. Moreover, AVV infection of mast cells may trigger aberrant inflammatory and immune responses in people affected by the mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). The pre-existence of natural antibodies binding PF4/heparin complexes may amplify platelet activation and thrombotic events. Finally, neosynthesized Covid 19 Spike protein interacting with its ACE2 receptor on endothelia, platelets and leucocyte may trigger further thrombotic events unleashing the WITT syndrome.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/physiopathology , Adenoviridae/genetics , Animals , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Genetic Vectors , Humans , Mice , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Factor 4 , Rabbits
14.
Scand J Immunol ; 94(5): e13097, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388398

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a global pandemic with a daily increasing number of affected individuals. Thrombosis is a severe complication of COVID-19 that leads to a worse clinical course with higher rates of mortality. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that hyperinflammation plays a crucial role in disease progression. This review compiles clinical data of COVID-19 patients who developed thrombotic complications to investigate the possible role of hyperinflammation in inducing hypercoagulation. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, Medline and Scopus to identify relevant clinical studies that investigated thrombotic manifestations and reported inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers in COVID-19 patients. Only 54 studies met our inclusion criteria, the majority of which demonstrated significantly elevated inflammatory markers. In the cohort studies with control, D-dimer was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients with thrombosis as compared to the control. Pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis and strokes were frequently reported which could be attributed to the hyperinflammatory response associated with COVID-19 and/or to the direct viral activation of platelets and endothelial cells, two mechanisms that are discussed in this review. It is recommended that all admitted COVID-19 patients should be assessed for hypercoagulation. Furthermore, several studies have suggested that anticoagulation may be beneficial, especially in hospitalized non-ICU patients. Although vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 have been approved and distributed in several countries, research should continue in the field of prevention and treatment of COVID-19 and its severe complications including thrombosis due to the emergence of new variants against which the efficacy of the vaccines is not yet clear.


Subject(s)
Arteries/pathology , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Venous Thrombosis/immunology , Animals , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Phenotype , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346497

ABSTRACT

Platelets are hematopoietic cells whose main function has for a long time been considered to be the maintenance of vascular integrity. They have an essential role in the hemostatic response, but they also have functional capabilities that go far beyond it. This review will provide an overview of platelet functions. Indeed, stress signals may induce platelet apoptosis through proapoptotis or hemostasis receptors, necrosis, and even autophagy. Platelets also interact with immune cells and modulate immune responses in terms of activation, maturation, recruitment and cytokine secretion. This review will also show that platelets, thanks to their wide range of innate immune receptors, and in particular toll-like receptors, and can be considered sentinels actively participating in the immuno-surveillance of the body. We will discuss the diversity of platelet responses following the engagement of these receptors as well as the signaling pathways involved. Finally, we will show that while platelets contribute significantly, via their TLRs, to immune response and inflammation, these receptors also participate in the pathophysiological processes associated with various pathogens and diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/pathology , Blood Platelets/pathology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Activation , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Animals , Atherosclerosis/immunology , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/metabolism
16.
Blood ; 138(14): 1269-1277, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317119

ABSTRACT

Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is a severe adverse effect of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 COVID-19 vaccine (Vaxzevria) and Janssen Ad26.COV2.S COVID-19 vaccine, and it is associated with unusual thrombosis. VITT is caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies activating platelets through their FcγRIIa receptors. Antibodies that activate platelets through FcγRIIa receptors have also been identified in patients with COVID-19. These findings raise concern that vaccination-induced antibodies against anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike protein cause thrombosis by cross-reacting with PF4. Immunogenic epitopes of PF4 and SARS-CoV-2 spike protein were compared using in silico prediction tools and 3D modeling. The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and PF4 share at least 1 similar epitope. Reactivity of purified anti-PF4 antibodies from patients with VITT was tested against recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. However, none of the affinity-purified anti-PF4 antibodies from 14 patients with VITT cross-reacted with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Sera from 222 polymerase chain reaction-confirmed patients with COVID-19 from 5 European centers were tested by PF4-heparin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and PF4-dependent platelet activation assays. We found anti-PF4 antibodies in sera from 19 (8.6%) of 222 patients with COVID-19. However, only 4 showed weak to moderate platelet activation in the presence of PF4, and none of those patients developed thrombotic complications. Among 10 (4.5%) of 222 patients who had COVID-19 with thrombosis, none showed PF4-dependent platelet-activating antibodies. In conclusion, antibodies against PF4 induced by vaccination do not cross-react with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, indicating that the intended vaccine-induced immune response against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is not the trigger of VITT. PF4-reactive antibodies found in patients with COVID-19 in this study were not associated with thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross Reactions/immunology , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cohort Studies , Epitopes/immunology , Female , Heparin/metabolism , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Young Adult
17.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(9): 105942, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281474

ABSTRACT

Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia is a rare syndrome following the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 or Ad26.COV2.S vaccine. Reported patients developed mainly venous thrombosis. We describe a case of a young healthy women suffering from acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion without cerebral venous thrombosis 8 days after vaccination and its consequences on recanalization strategy. Considering the thrombocytopenia, intravenous thrombolysis was contraindicated. She underwent mechanical thrombectomy with complete recanalization and dramatically improved clinically. Positive detection of anti-PF4-heparin-antibodies confirmed vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia diagnosis. In case of acute ischemic stroke after recent ChAdOx1 nCov-19 or Ad26.COV2.S vaccine, platelet count should be systematically checked before giving thrombolysis, and direct mechanical thrombectomy should be proposed in patients with large vessel occlusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/therapy , Thrombectomy , Vaccination/adverse effects , Adult , Antibodies/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Heparin/immunology , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/blood , Ischemic Stroke/chemically induced , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/blood , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome
19.
J Biomed Sci ; 28(1): 46, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266487

ABSTRACT

Dysregulated formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is observed in acute viral infections. Moreover, NETs contribute to the pathogenesis of acute viral infections, including those caused by the dengue virus (DV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Furthermore, excessive NET formation (NETosis) is associated with disease severity in patients suffering from SARS-CoV-2-induced multiple organ injuries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and other members of C-type lectin family (L-SIGN, LSECtin, CLEC10A) have been reported to interact with viral glycans to facilitate virus spreading and exacerbates inflammatory reactions. Moreover, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk)-coupled C-type lectin member 5A (CLEC5A) has been shown as the pattern recognition receptor for members of flaviviruses, and is responsible for DV-induced cytokine storm and Japanese encephalomyelitis virus (JEV)-induced neuronal inflammation. Moreover, DV activates platelets via CLEC2 to release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes (EXOs). The DV-activated EXOs (DV-EXOs) and MVs (DV-MVs) stimulate CLEC5A and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), respectively, to enhance NET formation and inflammatory reactions. Thus, EVs from virus-activated platelets (PLT-EVs) are potent endogenous danger signals, and blockade of C-type lectins is a promising strategy to attenuate virus-induced NETosis and intravascular coagulopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Encephalitis Virus, Japanese/immunology , Encephalitis, Japanese/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Encephalitis, Japanese/pathology , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology
20.
Mol Cell Biochem ; 476(10): 3815-3825, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263168

ABSTRACT

Chagas and COVID-19 are diseases caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and SARS-CoV-2, respectively. These diseases present very different etiological agents despite showing similarities such as susceptibility/risk factors, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), recognition of glycosaminoglycans, inflammation, vascular leakage hypercoagulability, microthrombosis, and endotheliopathy; all of which suggest, in part, treatments with similar principles. Here, both diseases are compared, focusing mainly on the characteristics related to dysregulated immunothrombosis. Given the in-depth investigation of molecules and mechanisms related to microthrombosis in COVID-19, it is necessary to reconsider a prompt treatment of Chagas disease with oral anticoagulants.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , Chagas Disease/pathology , Heparitin Sulfate/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/pathology , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Chagas Disease/immunology , Complement Activation/immunology , Endothelium/pathology , Humans , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/immunology , Platelet Activation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Trypanosoma cruzi/immunology
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