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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580687

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection is associated with a broad spectrum of presentations, but alveolar capillary microthrombi have been described as a common finding in COVID-19 patients, appearing as a consequence of a severe endothelial injury with endothelial cell membrane disruption. These observations clearly point to the identification of a COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, which may contribute to thrombosis, multi-organ damage, and cause of severity and fatality. One significant finding that emerges in prothrombotic abnormalities observed in COVID-19 patients is that the coagulation alterations are mainly mediated by the activation of platelets and intrinsically related to viral-mediated endothelial inflammation. Beyond the well-known role in hemostasis, the ability of platelets to also release various potent cytokines and chemokines has elevated these small cells from simple cell fragments to crucial modulators in the blood, including their inflammatory functions, that have a large influence on the immune response during infectious disease. Indeed, platelets are involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury also by promoting NET formation and affecting vascular permeability. Specifically, the deposition by activated platelets of the chemokine platelet factor 4 at sites of inflammation promotes adhesion of neutrophils on endothelial cells and thrombogenesis, and it seems deeply involved in the phenomenon of vaccine-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Importantly, the hyperactivated platelet phenotype along with evidence of cytokine storm, high levels of P-selectin, D-dimer, and, on the other hand, decreased levels of fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and thrombocytopenia may be considered suitable biomarkers that distinguish the late stage of COVID-19 progression in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , COVID-19/blood , Thrombosis/pathology , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hemostasis , Humans , Inflammation , Phenotype , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombocytopenia/metabolism , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology
2.
Blood ; 138(16): 1481-1489, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484294

ABSTRACT

A subset of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) become critically ill, suffering from severe respiratory problems and also increased rates of thrombosis. The causes of thrombosis in severely ill patients with COVID-19 are still emerging, but the coincidence of critical illness with the timing of the onset of adaptive immunity could implicate an excessive immune response. We hypothesized that platelets might be susceptible to activation by anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (anti-SARS-CoV-2) antibodies and might contribute to thrombosis. We found that immune complexes containing recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and anti-spike immunoglobulin G enhanced platelet-mediated thrombosis on von Willebrand factor in vitro, but only when the glycosylation state of the Fc domain was modified to correspond with the aberrant glycosylation previously identified in patients with severe COVID-19. Furthermore, we found that activation was dependent on FcγRIIA, and we provide in vitro evidence that this pathogenic platelet activation can be counteracted by the therapeutic small molecules R406 (fostamatinib) and ibrutinib, which inhibit tyrosine kinases Syk and Btk, respectively, or by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigen-Antibody Complex/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , von Willebrand Factor/genetics
3.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477931

ABSTRACT

Several recent reports have highlighted the onset of vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopaenia (VITT) in some recipients (approximately 1 case out of 100k exposures) of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (AstraZeneca). Although the underlying events leading to this blood-clotting phenomenon has yet to be elucidated, several critical observations present a compelling potential mechanism. Thrombus formation requires the von Willebrand (VWF) protein to be in ultra-large multimeric state. The conservation of this state is controlled by the ADAMTS13 enzyme, whose proteolytic activity reduces the size of VWF multimers, keeping blood clotting at bay. However, ADAMTS13 cannot act on VWF that is bound to platelet factor 4 (PF4). As such, it is of particular interest to note that a common feature between subjects presenting with VITT is high titres of antibodies against PF4. This raises the possibility that these antibodies preserve the stability of ultra-large VWF complexes, leading to the formation of endothelium-anchored VWF strings, which are capable of recruiting circulating platelets and causing uncontrolled thrombosis in terminal capillaries. Here, we share our viewpoint about the current understanding of the VITT pathogenesis involving the prevention of ADAMTS13's activity on VWF by PF4 antibody-mediated stabilisation/ protection of the PF4-VWF complex.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Antibodies , Autoantibodies/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Humans , Platelet Factor 4/metabolism , Polymorphism, Genetic , Protein Domains , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409707

ABSTRACT

Global data correlate severe vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, further suggesting the presence of a hypercoagulable state in severe COVID-19 patients, which could promote thrombosis in the lungs and in other organs. The feedback loop between COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and vitamin D also involves platelets (PLTs), since vitamin D deficiency stimulates PLT activation and aggregation and increases fibrinolysis and thrombosis. Vitamin D and PLTs share and play specific roles not only in coagulation and thrombosis but also during inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and immune response. Additionally, another 'fil rouge' between vitamin D and PLTs is represented by their role in mineral metabolism and bone health, since vitamin D deficiency, low PLT count, and altered PLT-related parameters are linked to abnormal bone remodeling in certain pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis (OP). Hence, it is possible to speculate that severe COVID-19 patients are characterized by the presence of several predisposing factors to bone fragility and OP that may be monitored to avoid potential complications. Here, we hypothesize different pervasive actions of vitamin D and PLT association in COVID-19, also allowing for potential preliminary information on bone health status during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Osteoporosis/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Bone Remodeling/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Feedback, Physiological , Humans , Osteoporosis/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346497

ABSTRACT

Platelets are hematopoietic cells whose main function has for a long time been considered to be the maintenance of vascular integrity. They have an essential role in the hemostatic response, but they also have functional capabilities that go far beyond it. This review will provide an overview of platelet functions. Indeed, stress signals may induce platelet apoptosis through proapoptotis or hemostasis receptors, necrosis, and even autophagy. Platelets also interact with immune cells and modulate immune responses in terms of activation, maturation, recruitment and cytokine secretion. This review will also show that platelets, thanks to their wide range of innate immune receptors, and in particular toll-like receptors, and can be considered sentinels actively participating in the immuno-surveillance of the body. We will discuss the diversity of platelet responses following the engagement of these receptors as well as the signaling pathways involved. Finally, we will show that while platelets contribute significantly, via their TLRs, to immune response and inflammation, these receptors also participate in the pathophysiological processes associated with various pathogens and diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/pathology , Blood Platelets/pathology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Activation , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Animals , Atherosclerosis/immunology , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/metabolism
7.
Biosci Rep ; 41(8)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334001

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2)-induced infection, the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is characterized by unprecedented clinical pathologies. One of the most important pathologies, is hypercoagulation and microclots in the lungs of patients. Here we study the effect of isolated SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 subunit as potential inflammagen sui generis. Using scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy as well as mass spectrometry, we investigate the potential of this inflammagen to interact with platelets and fibrin(ogen) directly to cause blood hypercoagulation. Using platelet-poor plasma (PPP), we show that spike protein may interfere with blood flow. Mass spectrometry also showed that when spike protein S1 is added to healthy PPP, it results in structural changes to ß and γ fibrin(ogen), complement 3, and prothrombin. These proteins were substantially resistant to trypsinization, in the presence of spike protein S1. Here we suggest that, in part, the presence of spike protein in circulation may contribute to the hypercoagulation in COVID-19 positive patients and may cause substantial impairment of fibrinolysis. Such lytic impairment may result in the persistent large microclots we have noted here and previously in plasma samples of COVID-19 patients. This observation may have important clinical relevance in the treatment of hypercoagulability in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Fibrin/metabolism , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , Adult , Aged , Amyloid/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Complement C3/metabolism , Female , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Microfluidic Analytical Techniques , Middle Aged , Prothrombin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology , Trypsin/metabolism
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325684

ABSTRACT

In severe COVID-19, which is characterized by blood clots and neutrophil-platelet aggregates in the circulating blood and different tissues, an increased incidence of cardiovascular complications and venous thrombotic events has been reported. The inflammatory storm that characterizes severe infections may act as a driver capable of profoundly disrupting the complex interplay between platelets, endothelium, and leukocytes, thus contributing to the definition of COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. In this frame, P-selectin represents a key molecule expressed on endothelial cells and on activated platelets, and contributes to endothelial activation, leucocyte recruitment, rolling, and tissue migration. Briefly, we describe the current state of knowledge about P-selectin involvement in COVID-19 pathogenesis, its possible use as a severity marker and as a target for host-directed therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , COVID-19/complications , P-Selectin/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 676828, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320577

ABSTRACT

In coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), ulcerative lesions have been episodically reported in various segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including the oral cavity, oropharynx, esophagus, stomach and bowel. In this report, we describe an autopsy case of a COVID-19 patient who showed two undiagnosed ulcers at the level of the anterior and posterior walls of the hypopharynx. Molecular testing of viruses involved in pharyngeal ulcers demonstrated the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome - coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA, together with herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Histopathologic analysis demonstrated full-thickness lympho-monocytic infiltration (mainly composed of CD68-positive cells), with hemorrhagic foci and necrosis of both the mucosal layer and deep skeletal muscle fibers. Fibrin and platelet microthrombi were also found. Cytological signs of HSV-1 induced damage were not found. Cells expressing SARS-CoV-2 spike subunit 1 were immunohistochemically identified in the inflammatory infiltrations. Immunohistochemistry for HSV1 showed general negativity for inflammatory infiltration, although in the presence of some positive cells. Thus, histopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular findings supported a direct role by SARS-CoV-2 in producing local ulcerative damage, although a possible contributory role by HSV-1 reactivation cannot be excluded. From a clinical perspective, this autopsy report of two undiagnosed lesions put the question if ulcers along the GI tract could be more common (but frequently neglected) in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hypopharynx/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Ulcer/pathology , Aged , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , Autopsy , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Herpesvirus 1, Human/genetics , Herpesvirus 1, Human/isolation & purification , Humans , Hypopharynx/virology , Immunohistochemistry , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/metabolism , Mucous Membrane/pathology , Muscle, Skeletal/pathology , Necrosis/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , Ulcer/virology
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(9)2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217089

ABSTRACT

Platelets are components of the blood that are highly reactive, and they quickly respond to multiple physiological and pathophysiological processes. In the last decade, it became clear that platelets are the key components of circulation, linking hemostasis, innate, and acquired immunity. Protein composition, localization, and activity are crucial for platelet function and regulation. The current state of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has tremendous potential to identify and quantify thousands of proteins from a minimal amount of material, unravel multiple post-translational modifications, and monitor platelet activity during drug treatments. This review focuses on the role of proteomics in understanding the molecular basics of the classical and newly emerging functions of platelets. including the recently described role of platelets in immunology and the development of COVID-19.The state-of-the-art proteomic technologies and their application in studying platelet biogenesis, signaling, and storage are described, and the potential of newly appeared trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is highlighted. Additionally, implementing proteomic methods in platelet transfusion medicine, and as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, is discussed.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Platelet Function Tests/methods , Proteomics/methods , Animals , Blood Platelets/cytology , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Platelet Transfusion , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Signal Transduction , Transfusion Medicine/methods
15.
Cell Biol Int ; 45(9): 1832-1850, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212726

ABSTRACT

December 2019 will never be forgotten in the history of medicine when an outbreak of pneumonia of unknown etiology in Wuhan, China sooner or later prompted the World Health Organization to issue a public health warning emergency. This is not the first nor will it be the last time that a member of ß-coronaviruses (CoVs) is waging a full-scale war against human health. Notwithstanding the fact that pneumonia is the primary symptom of the novel coronavirus (2019nCoV; designated as SARS-CoV-2), the emergence of severe disease mainly due to the injury of nonpulmonary organs at the shadow of coagulopathy leaves no choice, in some cases, rather than a dreadful death. Multiple casual factors such as inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet and complement activation, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system derangement, and hypoxemia play a major role in the pathogenesis of coagulopathy in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Due to the undeniable role of coagulation dysfunction in the initiation of several complications, assessment of coagulation parameters and the platelet count would be beneficial in early diagnosis and also timely prediction of disease severity. Although low-molecular-weight heparin is considered as the first-line of treatment in COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, several possible therapeutic options have also been proposed for better management of the disease. In conclusion, this review would help us to gain insight into the pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and laboratory findings associated with COVID-19 coagulopathy and would summarize management strategies to alleviate coagulopathy-related complications.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/cytology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Thromboembolism/etiology
17.
Gac Med Mex ; 156(6): 527-531, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194846

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There are hematological parameters that correlate severity and predict mortality mainly in septic and inflammatory states. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and systemic immune-inflammation index (SIII) with COVID-19 severity. METHOD: Descriptive, analytical, retrospective study of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, in whom NLR, PLR and SIII were analyzed. RESULTS: One-hundred patients were included, 54 men and 46 women, with a mean age of 49.4 ± 19.3 years. NLR, PLR and SIII means were 10.7 ± 10.9, 290.1 ± 229.2, and 2.6 ± 3.4 x 109, respectively. In 54 %, pneumonia was mild, and in 46 %, severe. Regarding hospital outcomes, 75 % were discharged due to improvement and 25 % died. NLR, PLR and SIII means of the patients who died versus the patients who improved were 20.4 ± 16.9 versus 7.5 ± 4.9 (p = 0.001), 417.1 ± 379.7 versus 247.7 ± 127.4 (p = 0.038) and 4.8 ± 6.1 versus 1.9 ± 1.2 × 109 (p = 0.030), respectively. CONCLUSION: Hematological parameters can be used in patients with COVID-19-associated pneumonia as predictors of severity and prognosis. INTRODUCCIÓN: Existen índices hematológicos que correlacionan la severidad y predicen la mortalidad, principalmente en ­estados sépticos y de inflamación. OBJETIVO: Correlacionar los índices neutrófilo/linfocito (INL), plaqueta/linfocito (IPL) e inmunidad/inflamación sistémica (IIIS) con la severidad de COVID-19. MÉTODO: Estudio descriptivo, analítico y retrospectivo de pacientes con neumonía por COVID-19, en quienes se analizaron INL, IPL e IIIS. RESULTADOS: Se incluyeron 100 pacientes, 54 hombres y 46 mujeres, con una media de 49.4 ± 19.3 años. Las medias de INL, IPL e IIIS fueron 10.7 ± 10.9, 290.1 ± 229.2 y 2.6 ± 3.4 × 109, respectivamente. En 54 %, la neumonía fue leve y en 46 %, grave. En cuanto a los desenlaces hospitalarios, 75 % egresó por mejoría y 25 % falleció. Las medias de INL, IPL e IIIS de los pacientes que fallecieron versus las de los pacientes que mejoraron fueron 20.4 ± 16.9 versus 7.5 ± 4.9 (p = 0.001), 417.1 ± 379.7 versus 247.7 ± 127.4 (p = 0.038) y 4.8 ± 6.1 versus 1.9 ± 1.2 × 109 (p = 0.030), respectivamente. CONCLUSIÓN: Los índices hematológicos en pacientes con neumonía por COVID-19 pueden ser empleados como predictores de severidad y pronóstico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/virology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adult , Aged , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
18.
J Leukoc Biol ; 109(1): 55-66, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188009

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 rapidly emerged as a crippling public health crisis in the last few months, which has presented a series health risk. Understanding of the immune response and biomarker analysis is needed to progress toward understanding disease pathology and developing improved treatment options. The goal of this study is to identify pathogenic factors that are linked to disease severity and patient characteristics. Patients with COVID-19 who were hospitalized from March 17 to June 5, 2020 were analyzed for clinical features of disease and soluble plasma cytokines in association with disease severity and sex. Data from COVID-19 patients with acute illness were examined along with an age- and gender-matched control cohort. We identified a group of 16 soluble factors that were found to be increased in COVID-19 patients compared to controls, whereas 2 factors were decreased. In addition to inflammatory cytokines, we found significant increases in factors known to mediate vasculitis and vascular remodeling (PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB-BB, soluble CD40L (sCD40L), FGF, and IP10). Four factors such as platelet-derived growth factors, fibroblast growth factor-2, and IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 were strongly associated with severe disease and ICU admission. Th2-related factors (IL-4 and IL-13) were increased with IL-4 and sCD40L present at increased levels in males compared with females. Our analysis revealed networking clusters of cytokines and growth factors, including previously unknown roles of vascular and stromal remodeling, activation of the innate immunity, as well activation of type 2 immune responses in the immunopathogenesis of COVID-19. These data highlight biomarker associations with disease severity and sex in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokines , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Characteristics , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Th2 Cells/immunology
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(5)2021 Feb 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120857

ABSTRACT

The beneficial effects of long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) in cardioprotection are widely known and generally accepted. In this literature review, we have focused on the known and postulated mechanisms of action of omega-3 PUFAs and their metabolites on various components of the haemostatic system, in particular on blood platelets and endothelium. We have also made an attempt to provide a comprehensive review of epidemiological studies with particular regard to clinical trials. Notably, the results of these studies are contradictory, and some of them failed to report the beneficial effects of taking or supplementing omega-3 PUFAs in the diet. A potential explanation, in our opinion, could be the need to use higher doses of omega-3 PUFAs and a proper ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs. An additional problem which is difficult to solve is the use of a proper neutral placebo for interventional studies. Despite some controversies regarding the beneficial effects of supplementation of omega-3 PUFAs in cardiovascular disease, our review suggests that a promising aspect of future studies and applications is to focus on the anti-thrombotic properties of these compounds. An argument supporting this assumption is the recent use of omega-3 PUFAs as a supporting tool for the treatment of COVID-19 complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/administration & dosage , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Diet , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/metabolism , Fatty Acids, Omega-6/administration & dosage , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Hemostasis/drug effects , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis/drug therapy
20.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol ; 40(12): 2975-2989, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105571

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary thrombosis is observed in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pneumonia. Aim was to investigate whether subpopulations of platelets were programmed to procoagulant and inflammatory activities in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with pneumonia, without comorbidities predisposing to thromboembolism. Approach and Results: Overall, 37 patients and 28 healthy subjects were studied. Platelet-leukocyte aggregates, platelet-derived microvesicles, the expression of P-selectin, and active fibrinogen receptor on platelets were quantified by flow cytometry. The profile of 45 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors released by platelets was defined by immunoassay. The contribution of platelets to coagulation factor activity was selectively measured. Numerous platelet-monocyte (mean±SE, 67.9±4.9%, n=17 versus 19.4±3.0%, n=22; P<0.0001) and platelet-granulocyte conjugates (34.2±4.04% versus 8.6±0.7%; P<0.0001) were detected in patients. Resting patient platelets had similar levels of P-selectin (10.9±2.6%, n=12) to collagen-activated control platelets (8.7±1.5%), which was not further increased by collagen activation on patient platelets (12.4±2.5%, P=nonsignificant). The agonist-stimulated expression of the active fibrinogen receptor was reduced by 60% in patients (P<0.0001 versus controls). Cytokines (IL [interleukin]-1α, IL-1ß, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, IL, 17, IL-27, IFN [interferon]-α, and IFN-γ), chemokines (MCP-1/CCL2 [monocyte chemoattractant protein 1]), and growth factors (VEGF [vascular endothelial growth factor]-A/D) were released in significantly larger amounts upon stimulation of COVID-19 platelets. Platelets contributed to increased fibrinogen, VWF (von Willebrand factor), and factor XII in COVID-19 patients. Patients (28.5±0.7 s, n=32), unlike controls (31.6±0.5 s, n=28; P<0.001), showed accelerated factor XII-dependent coagulation. CONCLUSIONS: Platelets in COVID-19 pneumonia are primed to spread proinflammatory and procoagulant activities in systemic circulation.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Thromboembolism/blood
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