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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(7): e28856, 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735689

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first detected in China in December 2019, and declared as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11, 2020.To study the clinical features of patients with COVID-19, we analyzed the correlation between some inflammation-related indicators in patients' serum and the severity of the disease, especially PV (pneumonia volume under CT scan) and pneumonia volume ratio (PVR).Sixty-six COVID-19 patients in Huai'an, China were selected as the research subjects. We collected the clinical data, including general characteristics, clinical symptoms, serum test results and CT performance, explored the relationship between inflammation-related indexes, oxygenation index, PV, PVR, while indicators of mild to moderate patients and severe patients were compared.The most prominent manifestations of COVID-19 patients were fever (47, 71.2%); cough (41, 62.1%), with or without respiratory and other systemic symptoms; There was no difference in gender (P = .567) and age (P = .865) between mild to moderate and severe groups. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) of overall patients were higher than the normal range (P < .001, respectively). hs-CRP was negatively correlated with oxygenation index (OI) (r = -0.55), whereas positively correlated with PV, PVR and ESR (r = 0.89; r = 0.87; r = 0.47, respectively); ESR was negatively correlated with OI (r = -0.45), meanwhile it was positively correlated with PV and PVR (r = 0.44; r = 0.46, respectively). OI was negatively correlated with PV and PVR (r = -0.6, respectively). PV had a clear correlation with PVR (r = 1). Severe patients' hs-CRP, PV, PVR were higher than mild to moderate group (P = .006; P = .001; P < .001, respectively), but OI was lower (P < .001).The clinical features of COVID-19 were similar to general viral pneumonia. hs-CRP, ESR showed a certain correlation with the PV and PVR, which might play a certain role in assessing the severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Humans , Inflammation
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(3): 1033-1041, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700492

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a debilitating disease with numerous medical and non-medical consequences. Our study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Persian barley water in controlling the clinical outcomes of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a single-blind, add-on therapy, randomized controlled clinical trial conducted in Shiraz, Iran, from January to March 2021. One hundred hospitalized COVID-19 patients with moderate disease severity were randomly allocated to receive routine treatment (per local protocols) with or without 250 ml of Persian barley water (PBW) daily for two weeks. Clinical outcomes and blood tests were recorded before and after the study period. Multivariable modeling was applied using Stata software for data analysis. RESULTS: The PBW product passed our standardization and safety assessments. Length of hospital stay (LHS) was 4.5 days shorter in the intervention group than the control group regardless of history of cigarette smoking (95% confidence interval: -7.22, -1.79 days). Also, body temperature, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and creatinine significantly dropped in the intervention group compared to the control group. No adverse events related to PBW occurred. CONCLUSIONS: This clinical trial demonstrated the efficacy of PBW in minimizing the LHS, fever, and levels of ESR, CRP, and creatinine among hospitalized COVID-19 patients with moderate disease severity. More robust trials can help find safe and effective herbal formulations as treatments for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hordeum , /methods , Adult , Aged , Blood Sedimentation/drug effects , C-Reactive Protein/drug effects , Creatinine , Fever/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome
3.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 105: 108542, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638183

ABSTRACT

It remains important to investigate the changing and impact of routine blood values (RBVs) in order to predict mortality and follow an appropriate treatment in COVID-19 patients. In the study, the importance of RBVs in the mortality of patients with COVID-19 was investigated. The changes in the biochemical, hematological, and immunological parameters of patients who recovered (n = 4364) and died (n = 233) from COVID-19 over time and their relationship with the mortality of the disease were evaluated retrospectively. Odds ratios of the parameters affecting one-month mortality were calculated by running multiple-logistic-regression analysis. The cut off values and diagnostic efficiencies of the parameters that posed a risk for mortality were obtained via receiver operating curve analysis. It was determined that the C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer, procalcitonin, erythrocyte-sedimentation-rate (ESR), troponin values were at abnormal levels until death occurred in the patients who died. In addition, the procalcitonin levels were consistently high in patients who died. The patients who died generally had a sustained increase in their leukocyte and neutrophil levels and biochemical variables, and an ongoing decrease in lymphopenia and eosinopenia levels. Although significant changes were observed in liver function tests, cardiac troponin, hemogram values, kidney function tests and parameters related to inflammation in deceased patients, high ESR, international-normalized-ratio (INR), prothrombin-time (PT), CRP, D-dimer, ferritin and red-cell-distribution width (RDW) values, respectively, were the most effective predictive mortality risk biomarkers of COVID-19. In addition, neutrophilia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, erythrocytopenia were other risk predictors of mortality. Indicators was found in this study can be successfully used to predict mortality from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/immunology , Erythrocyte Indices , Female , Ferritins , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Humans , International Normalized Ratio , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Procalcitonin , Retrospective Studies , Troponin
4.
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc ; 79(3): 485-488, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581405

ABSTRACT

Sepsis and septic shock result in impaired microcirculation and red blood cell rheology which lead to tissue hypoxia and multi-organ failure. Early administration of triiodothyronine prevents tissue hypoxia in experimental sepsis. In this context, a clinical trial was initiated to test the efficacy of acute triiodothyronine administration to combat tissue hypoxia in critically ill COVID19 patients. Here, we provide preliminary data from interim analysis of this study showing a novel acute effect of triiodothyronine on erythrocyte sedimentation rate which may have an important therapeutic impact on red blood cell rheology and tissue hypoxia in sepsis and particular in COVID19 critical illness.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04348513. Registered 16 April 2020, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04348513.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Shock, Septic , Blood Sedimentation , Critical Illness , Erythrocytes , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/drug therapy , Triiodothyronine
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(44): e27435, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570139

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This retrospective study was to investigate the association between clinical characteristics and computerized tomography (CT) findings in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The clinical data of COVID-19 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Spearman correlation analysis was used to identify the correlation. Totally 209 consecutive COVID-19 patients were eligible for the study, with the mean age of 47.53 ±â€Š13.52 years. At onset of the disease, the most common symptoms were fever (85.65%) and cough (61.24%). The CT features of COVID-19 included pulmonary, bronchial, and pleural changes, with the significant pulmonary presentation of ground-glass opacification (93.30%), consolidation (48.80%), ground-glass opacification plus a reticular pattern (54.07%), telangiectasia (84.21%), and pulmonary fibrotic streaks (49.76%). Spearman analysis showed that the CT findings had significantly inverse associations with the platelets, lymphocyte counts, and sodium levels, but were positively related to the age, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, D-dimer, lactic dehydrogenase, α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels (P < .05). In conclusion, the severity of lung abnormalities on CT in COVID-19 patients is inversely associated with the platelets, lymphocyte count, and sodium levels, whereas positively with the age, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, D-dimer, lactic dehydrogenase, hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Age Factors , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Humans , Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase , Lung , Lymphocyte Count , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Retrospective Studies , Sodium/blood
6.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 36(1): e24162, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555764

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Most patients infected with the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), as the causative agent of COVID-19 disease, show mild symptoms, but some of them develop severe illness. The purpose of this study was to analyze the blood markers of COVID-19 patients and to investigate the correlation between serum inflammatory cytokines and the disease severity. METHODS: In this prospective cross-sectional study, 50 patients with COVID-19 and 20 patients without COVID-19 were enrolled. According to ICU admission criteria, patients were divided into two groups of non-severe and severe. Differences in the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6, and TNF-α, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), lymphocytes (LYM) count, and neutrophils (NEU) count between the two groups were determined and analyzed. RESULTS: Out of the 50 patients with COVID-19, 14 were diagnosed as severe cases. There was no significant difference between the two groups of COVID-19 patients in terms of gender and age. Blood tests of COVID-19 patients showed a significant decrease and increase in NEU and LYM counts, respectively. There were significant differences in the serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP between the severe and non-severe groups, which were higher in the severe group. Also, there was a significant correlation between the disease severity and CRP with ESR (r = 0.79), CRP with IL-6 (r = 0.74), LYM with NEU (r = -0.97), and ESR with TNF-α (r = 0.7). CONCLUSION: The findings of this study, as the first study in Iran, suggest that the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, ESR, and CRP could be used to predict the severity of COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/etiology , Inflammation/blood , Adult , Aged , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
7.
J Mol Neurosci ; 72(1): 27-36, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544564

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and the related disorder i.e. "coronavirus disease 2019" (COVID-19) has encouraged researchers to unravel the molecular mechanism of disease severity. Several lines of evidence support the impact of "cytokine storm" in the pathogenesis of severe forms of the disorder. We aimed to assess expression levels of nine cytokine coding genes in COVID-19 patients admitted in a hospital. We collected clinical data of patients from their medical reports. Then, we assessed expression of genes using real-time PCR. Expression levels of IFN-G, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, TGF-B, IL-8, and IL-1B were significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared with healthy controls and in both female and male patients compared with sex-matched controls. However, expression level of TNF-A was not different between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. Expression of none of these cytokines was different between ICU-admitted patients and other patients except for IL-6 whose expression was lower in the former group compared with the latter (ratio of means = 0.33, P value = 4.82E-02). Then, we assessed diagnostic power of cytokine coding genes in differentiating between COVID-19 patients and controls. The area under curve (AUC) values ranged from 0.94 for IFN-G to 1.0 for IL-2 and IL-1B. After combining the transcript levels of all cytokines, AUC, sensitivity, and specificity values reached 100%, 100%, and 99%, respectively. For differentiation between ICU-admitted patients and other patients, IL-4 with AUC value of 0.68 had the best diagnostic power among cytokine coding genes. Expression of none of cytokine coding genes was correlated with the available clinical/demographic data including age, gender, ICU admission, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)/C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. This study provides further evidence for contribution of "cytokine storm" in the pathobiology of moderate/severe forms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/genetics , Pandemics , RNA, Messenger/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Critical Care , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 163, 2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Flares of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have been described in the context of various infections. Flares of rheumatic diseases in adults have been described following infection with SARS-CoV-2 in several cohorts. So far, the effect of infection with SARS-CoV-2 on the course of JIA is unknown. METHODS: The database of the German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology was searched for patients with confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 and subsequent disease flare, admitted from July 2020 until June 2021. cJADAS-27, ESR and C-reactive protein, as well as uveitis activity, medication at the time of flare and treatment of flare was extracted. Patient cases were described individually. RESULTS: Out of 988 patients admitted, five patients with remission off medication (n = 2) or inactive disease on medication (n = 3) were identified, with flare symptoms up to four weeks after infection with SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Flares can occur after infection with SARS-CoV-2 in patients with JIA in remission or inactive disease on medication. Treating physicians need to be aware of this fact, especially when counseling patients with rheumatic diseases about the respective dangers of COVID-19 and vaccination against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Juvenile/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Symptom Flare Up , Adolescent , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Juvenile/complications , Arthritis, Juvenile/drug therapy , Arthritis, Juvenile/metabolism , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Child , Etanercept/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Remission Induction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Uveitis/complications , Uveitis/physiopathology
9.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 1676914, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533104

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study screened for factors affecting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) incidence in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, appraised vitamin D's efficacy in preventing COVID-19, and assessed the effects of clinical characteristics, glycemic status, vitamin D, and hydroxychloroquine administration on COVID-19's progression and severity in T1DM patients. METHODS: This retrospective research on 150 adults was conducted at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, KSA. Participants were allocated to three groups (50/group): control, T1DM, and T1DM with COVID-19. Participants' fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), complete blood count, vitamin D, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, D-dimer, liver and kidney function, and hydroxychloroquine treatment were retrieved and analyzed. RESULTS: The percentages of comorbidities and not taking hydroxychloroquine were significantly higher among T1DM patients with COVID-19 than patients with T1DM only. Mean vitamin D level was significantly lower in T1DM with COVID-19 patients than in the other two groups. Vitamin D showed a significant negative correlation with LDH, CRP, ESR, ferritin, and D-dimer, which was the most reliable predictor of COVID-19 severity in T1DM patients. CONCLUSION: Comorbidities and vitamin D deficiency are risk factors for COVID-19 in patients with T1DM. Patients who do not take hydroxychloroquine and have higher FBG and HbA1c levels are vulnerable to COVID-19. Vitamin D may be useful for preventing COVID-19 in T1DM patients. Comorbidities, higher FBG and HbA1c levels, not taking hydroxychloroquine, and vitamin D inadequacy elevate COVID-19 progression and severity in patients with T1DM.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Adult , Blood Cell Count , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/blood , Disease Progression , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Humans , Incidence , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index
10.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 35(12): e24088, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At present, SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in the world rapidly spread. It is a serious global public health emergency. METHODS: In this study, we described the clinical characteristics of 11 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the Meizhou People's Hospital, and viral genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 from these patients were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 11 patients, six cases developed fever, 9 cases developed a cough, and two cases developed headache and chills. Four patients (36.4%) had underlying diseases. Pneumonia is the most common complication. The laboratory test results showed that there were no adult patients with increased lymphocyte/lymphocyte percentage (LYM/LYM%). Most patients had normal total protein (TP) and albumin (ALB), but only two patients had decreased. Most patients had increased or normal levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein (CRP), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (FIB), creatine kinase isoenzymes (CK-MB), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Neutrophil (NEU) (r = 0.664, p = 0.026), CK-MB (r = 0.655, p = 0.029) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (r = 0.682, p = 0.021) were significantly associated with SARS-CoV-2 virus cycle threshold (Ct) value. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) shows that two different SNPs were identified at positions 8781 and 28144, and have a complete linkage genetic form of 8781C-28144T and 8781T-28144C. CONCLUSIONS: The reports of the 11 COVID-19 patients in our hospital will provide useful information for the diagnosis, treatment, and drug development of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , China , Creatine Kinase, MB Form/blood , Female , Genome, Viral , Hospitalization , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Load , Viral Proteins/genetics
11.
Med Gas Res ; 12(2): 51-54, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481081

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) triggers important changes in routine blood tests. In this retrospective case-control study, biochemical, hematological and inflammatory biomarkers between March 10, 2020, and November 30, 2020 from 3969 COVID-19 patients (3746 in the non-intensive care unit (non-ICU) group and 223 in the ICU group) were analyzed by dividing into three groups as spring, summer and autumn. In the non-ICU group, lymphocyte to monocyte ratio was lower in autumn than the other two seasons and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio was higher in autumn than the other two seasons. Also, monocyte and platelet were higher in spring than autumn; and eosinophil, hematocrit, hemoglobin, lymphocyte, and red blood cells decreased from spring to autumn. In the non-ICU group, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyltransferase gradually increased from spring to autumn, while albumin, alkaline phosphatase, calcium, total bilirubin and total protein gradually decreased. Additionally, C-reactive protein was higher in autumn than the other seasons, erythrocyte sedimentation rate was higher in autumn than summer. The changes in routine blood biomarkers in COVID-19 varied from the emergence of the disease until now. Also, the timely changes of blood biomarkers were mostly more negative, indicating that the disease progresses severely. The study was approved by the Erzincan Binali Yildirim University Non-interventional Clinical Trials Ethic Committee (approval No. 86041) on June 21, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Blood Sedimentation , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood) ; 247(2): 145-151, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438228

ABSTRACT

This study sought to evaluate the candidacy of plasma osteopontin (OPN) as a biomarker of COVID-19 severity and multisystem inflammatory condition in children (MIS-C) in children. A retrospective analysis of 26 children (0-21 years of age) admitted to Children's Healthcare of Atlanta with a diagnosis of COVID-19 between March 17 and May 26, 2020 was undertaken. The patients were classified into three categories based on COVID-19 severity levels: asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic (control population, admitted for other non-COVID-19 conditions), mild/moderate, and severe COVID-19. A fourth category of children met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's case definition for MIS-C. Residual blood samples were analyzed for OPN, a marker of inflammation using commercial ELISA kits (R&D), and results were correlated with clinical data. This study demonstrates that OPN levels are significantly elevated in children hospitalized with moderate and severe COVID-19 and MIS-C compared to OPN levels in mild/asymptomatic children. Further, OPN differentiated among clinical levels of severity in COVID-19, while other inflammatory markers including maximum erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and ferritin, minimum lymphocyte and platelet counts, soluble interleukin-2R, and interleukin-6 did not. We conclude OPN is a potential biomarker of COVID-19 severity and MIS-C in children that may have future clinical utility. The specificity and positive predictive value of this marker for COVID-19 and MIS-C are areas for future larger prospective research studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Osteopontin/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Ferritins/blood , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Platelet Count , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Young Adult
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17885, 2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402124

ABSTRACT

We propose a classification method using the radiomics features of CT chest images to identify patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and other pneumonias. The chest CT images of two groups of participants (90 COVID-19 patients who were confirmed as positive by nucleic acid test of RT-PCR and 90 other pneumonias patients) were collected, and the two groups of data were manually drawn to outline the region of interest (ROI) of pneumonias. The radiomics method was used to extract textural features and histogram features of the ROI and obtain a radiomics features vector from each sample. Then, we divided the data into two independent radiomic cohorts for training (70 COVID-19 patients and 70 other pneumonias patients), and validation (20 COVID-19 patients and 20 other pneumonias patients) by using support vector machine (SVM). This model used 20 rounds of tenfold cross-validation for training. Finally, single-shot testing of the final model was performed on the independent validation cohort. In the COVID-19 patients, correlation analysis (multiple comparison correction-Bonferroni correction, P < 0.05/7) was also conducted to determine whether the textural and histogram features were correlated with the laboratory test index of blood, i.e., blood oxygen, white blood cell, lymphocytes, neutrophils, C-reactive protein, hypersensitive C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The final model showed good discrimination on the independent validation cohort, with an accuracy of 89.83%, sensitivity of 94.22%, specificity of 85.44%, and AUC of 0.940. This proved that the radiomics features were highly distinguishable, and this SVM model can effectively identify and diagnose patients with COVID-19 and other pneumonias. The correlation analysis results showed that some textural features were positively correlated with WBC, and NE, and also negatively related to SPO2H and NE. Our results showed that radiomic features can classify COVID-19 patients and other pneumonias patients. The SVM model can achieve an excellent diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnosis , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Support Vector Machine , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Biomedical Engineering , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 107(2): e698-e707, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity is an established risk factor for severe COVID-19 outcomes. The mechanistic underpinnings of this association are not well-understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the mediating role of systemic inflammation in obesity-associated COVID-19 outcomes. METHODS: This hospital-based, observational study included 3828 SARS-CoV-2-infected patients who were hospitalized February to May 2020 at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) or Columbia University Irving Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital (CUIMC/NYP). We use mediation analysis to evaluate whether peak inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein [CRP], erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], D-dimer, ferritin, white blood cell count and interleukin-6) are in the causal pathway between obesity (BMI ≥ 30) and mechanical ventilation or death within 28 days of presentation to care. RESULTS: In the MGH cohort (n = 1202), obesity was associated with greater likelihood of ventilation or death (OR = 1.73; 95% CI = [1.25, 2.41]; P = 0.001) and higher peak CRP (P < 0.001) compared with nonobese patients. The estimated proportion of the association between obesity and ventilation or death mediated by CRP was 0.49 (P < 0.001). Evidence of mediation was more pronounced in patients < 65 years (proportion mediated = 0.52 [P < 0.001] vs 0.44 [P = 0.180]). Findings were more moderate but consistent for peak ESR. Mediation by other inflammatory markers was not supported. Results were replicated in CUIMC/NYP cohort (n = 2626). CONCLUSION: Findings support systemic inflammatory pathways in obesity-associated severe COVID-19 disease, particularly in patients < 65 years, captured by CRP and ESR. Contextualized in clinical trial findings, these results reveal therapeutic opportunity to target systemic inflammatory pathways and monitor interventions in high-risk subgroups and particularly obese patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Obesity/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/mortality , Risk Factors , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
15.
Stroke ; 52(11): e706-e709, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371922
16.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(11): 106063, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364289

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Stroke, a dreaded complication of SARS-CoV2, has been reported in 0.9 to 5% of SARS-CoV2 patients. There are concerns that SARS-CoV2 infection has a significant independent association with acute ischemic stroke, even in the absence of conventional cerebrovascular risk factors. Whether elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers have predictive value in the occurrence of stroke in SARS-CoV2 is poorly understood. AIM: To profile the characteristics of SARS-CoV2 positive patients with ischemic stroke (COVID-Stroke) and to identify the significance of elevated IBMs in the prediction of ischemic COVID-stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical characteristics, stroke risk factors, laboratory parameters- including levels of inflammatory biomarkers, and outcome of SARS-CoV2 patients with stroke (n=60) were collected. SARS-CoV2 RT- PCR positive age, gender, and pulmonary severity matched non-stroke patients were taken as controls (n = 60). Binary multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to find the predictors of ischemic COVID-stroke. RESULTS: D-dimer > 441.8 ng/mL, LDH> 395U/L, ESR >19 mm/h and CRP> 0.2 mg/dL were independently found to be very strong predictors of occurrence of ischemic COVID-stroke (p < 0.001 for each). On multivariate analysis, D-dimer > 441.8 ng/mL, ESR > 19 mm/h, and RDW > 16.1% were found to be the most strong predictors of the occurrence of ischemic COVID-stroke. Conventional CVD risk factors- higher age (> 60years), presence of diabetes mellitus, and hypertension were not found to be significant predictors in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: In SARS-CoV2 patients, D-dimer elevated beyond 441.8 ng/mL, ESR greater than 19 mm/h, and RDW widened more than 16.1% were the strongest predictors of the occurrence of ischemic stroke. This is the first study that attempts to find cut-off levels of IBMs in the prediction of ischemic COVID-stroke.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Sedimentation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Erythrocyte Indices , Female , Humans , Incidence , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Up-Regulation
17.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5425-5431, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363680

ABSTRACT

A rapid outbreak of novel coronavirus, coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), has made it a global pandemic. This study focused on the possible association between lymphopenia and computed tomography (CT) scan features and COVID-19 patient mortality. The clinical data of 596 COVID-19 patients were collected from February 2020 to September 2020. The patients' serological survey and CT scan features were retrospectively explored. The median age of the patients was 56.7 ± 16.4 years old. Lung involvement was more than 50% in 214 COVID-19 patients (35.9%). The average blood lymphocyte percentage was 20.35 ± 10.16 (normal range, 20%-50%). Although the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were high in more than 80% of COVID-19 patients; CRP, ESR, and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) may not indicate the in-hospital mortality of COVID-19. Patients with severe lung involvement and lymphopenia were found to be significantly associated with increased odds of death (odds ratio, 9.24; 95% confidence interval, 4.32-19.78). These results indicated that lymphopenia < 20% along with pulmonary involvement >50% impose a multiplicative effect on the risk of mortality. The in-hospital mortality rate of this group was significantly higher than other COVID-19 hospitalized cases. Furthermore, they meaningfully experienced a prolonged stay in the hospital (p = .00). Lymphocyte count less than 20% and chest CT scan findings with more than 50% involvement might be related to the patient's mortality. These could act as laboratory and clinical indicators of disease severity, mortality, and outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lung/pathology , Lymphopenia/complications , Pneumonia/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Iran , Lung/virology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Lymphocytes/virology , Lymphopenia/diagnostic imaging , Lymphopenia/mortality , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia/mortality , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
18.
Hemoglobin ; 45(2): 124-128, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281786

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to examine the relationship between Hb A1c levels and the clinical course of coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) patients. Sixty-six COVID-19(+) patients with high Hb A1c and 46 with average Hb A1c and 30 COVID-19(-) patients with average Hb A1c were included. Hb A1c levels and parameters examined in COVID-19(+) patients were compared between groups, and correlation analysis was performed between these parameters and Hb A1c levels. The effect of Hb A1c levels on intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality rate in COVID-19 patients was analyzed with the χ2 test. It was observed that hemoglobin (Hb) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) levels of the COVID-19 (+) groups was lower than the COVID-19 (-) group, while ferritin, D-dimer, procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were higher. The COVID-19 (+) group with high Hb A1c had higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), PCT and D-dimer levels than the other two groups, while Hb, partial arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) levels were lower. The Hb A1c levels of the COVID-19 (+) groups were positively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC), LDH, PCT and (K+) levels, while negatively correlated with Hb and PaO2 levels. Hb A1c was found to be associated with the inflammation process, coagulation disorders and low PaO2 in COVID-19 patients. The COVID-19 patients with high Hb A1c levels had a higher mortality rate than other COVID-19 patients. Using Hb A1c measurements with other prognostic markers would contribute to the patient's risk of death assessment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Hyperglycemia/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Diabetes Complications/blood , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Hyperglycemia/etiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Oxygen/blood , Partial Pressure , Procalcitonin/blood , Prognosis , Risk , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology
19.
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc ; 79(3): 485-488, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278368

ABSTRACT

Sepsis and septic shock result in impaired microcirculation and red blood cell rheology which lead to tissue hypoxia and multi-organ failure. Early administration of triiodothyronine prevents tissue hypoxia in experimental sepsis. In this context, a clinical trial was initiated to test the efficacy of acute triiodothyronine administration to combat tissue hypoxia in critically ill COVID19 patients. Here, we provide preliminary data from interim analysis of this study showing a novel acute effect of triiodothyronine on erythrocyte sedimentation rate which may have an important therapeutic impact on red blood cell rheology and tissue hypoxia in sepsis and particular in COVID19 critical illness.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04348513. Registered 16 April 2020, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04348513.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Shock, Septic , Blood Sedimentation , Critical Illness , Erythrocytes , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/drug therapy , Triiodothyronine
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25645, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242118

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Since December 2019, pneumonia caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), namely 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), has rapidly spread from Wuhan city to other cities across China. The present study was designed to describe the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of 74 hospitalized patients with COVID-19.Clinical data of 74 COVID-19 patients were collected to analyze the epidemiological, demographic, laboratory, radiological, and treatment data. Thirty-two patients were followed up and tested for the presence of the viral nucleic acid and by pulmonary computed tomography (CT) scan at 7 and 14 days after they were discharged.Among all COVID-19 patients, the median incubation period for patients and the median period from symptom onset to admission was all 6 days; the median length of hospitalization was 13 days. Fever symptoms were presented in 83.78% of the patients, and the second most common symptom was cough (74.32%), followed by fatigue and expectoration (27.03%). Inflammatory indicators, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) of the intensive care unit (ICU) patients were significantly higher than that of the non-ICU patients (P < .05). However, 50.00% of the ICU patients had their the ratio of T helper cells to cytotoxic T cells (CD4/CD8) ratio lower than 1.1, whose proportion is much higher than that in non-ICU patients (P < .01).Compared with patients in Wuhan, COVID-19 patients in Anhui Province seemed to have milder symptoms of infection, suggesting that there may be some regional differences in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between different cities.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibiotic Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cities/epidemiology , Cough/blood , Cough/therapy , Cough/virology , Female , Fever/blood , Fever/therapy , Fever/virology , Follow-Up Studies , Geography , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
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