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1.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256330, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has proved to have an indirect impact on essential health services in several parts of the world which could lead to increased morbidity and mortality and loss of the gains made in the past decades. There were no synthesized scientific evidences which could show the impact of COVID-19 epidemics/pandemic on essential health services in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the impacts of COVID-19 epidemics/pandemic on essential health services provision in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. METHODS: A pre-post study design was used to assess the impacts of COVID-19 on essential health services delivery in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia in the second quarter of 2020 (Post COVID-19) compared to similar quarter in 2019 (Pre COVID-19). The study focuses on five categories; namely; maternal, neonatal and child health care; communicable diseases with a focus on HIV and TB-HIV co-infection; prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV; basic emergency, outpatient, inpatient and blood bank services, non-communicable diseases and road traffic accidents (RTAs). Analysis was done using Stata version 14.0 software package. The effects of COVID-19 epidemics/pandemic were calculated taking the differences between post COVID -19 and pre COVID-19 periods and the levels of service disruptions presented using proportions. Wilcoxon sign rank test was done and a significance level of ≤0.05 was considered as having significant difference among the two quarters. RESULTS: There were significant increase in institutional delivery, delivery by Caesarian Section (CS), still birth, postnatal care within 7 days of delivery, the number of children who received all vaccine doses before 1st birthday, the number of under 5 children screened and had moderate acute malnutrition, the number of under 5 children screened and had severe acute malnutrition and children with SAM admitted for management. However, there were significant decrease in HIV testing and detection along with enrolment to antiretroviral therapy (ART) care, number of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk ≥ 30% received treatment, RTAs, total units of blood received from national blood transfusion service (NBTS) and regional blood banks, total number of units of blood transfused and emergency referral. There were no significant changes in outpatient visits and admissions. CONCLUSION: Despite commendable achievements in maintaining several of the essential health services, COVID-19 has led to an increase in under nutrition in under five children, decline in HIV detection and care, CVD, cervical cancer screening and blood bank services. Therefore, governments, local and international agencies need to introduce innovative ways to rapidly expand and deliver services in the context of COVID-19. Moreover, lower income countries have to customize comprehensive and coordinated community-based health care approaches, including outreach and campaigns. In addition, countries should ensure that NCDs are incorporated in their national COVID-19 response plans to provide essential health care services to people living with NCDs and HIV or HIV-TB co-infection during the COVID-19 pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Ethiopia , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Pandemics , Postnatal Care , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 1474426, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622111

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic caused a major impact on blood donation process and supply globally. A lockdown management procedure was launched nationally in Saudi Arabia to manage this global health crisis. The main aim of this study was to determine the effect of COVID-19 lockdown on blood donation services and supply in different regions of Saudi Arabia. Study Design and Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the blood bank centers of 5 major cities including Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam, Hail, and Jizan in Saudi Arabia. Demographic and blood characteristics were retrieved from the first 6 months of 2019 (January-June) and compared to the same period of 2020. Results: Our findings showed variation in the characteristics of blood donation and supply among the centers surveyed, as some of these centers were adversely affected, while others showed an increase in the availability of blood products during the pandemic. For example, Jeddah's center was significantly affected by COVID-19 lockdown whereas Hail's center showed a significant increase in the analyzed characteristics of blood donation services in 2020 compared to 2019. Overall, there was no major difference among the surveyed centers between 2020 and 2019, and this might be due to the effective management of blood supply and transfusion. Discussion. Although blood supply and transfusion practice was slightly affected at various degree among the surveyed centers, the whole process did not show a significant effect on the overall outcome. This is in fact due to the proper preparedness, management of blood requirements and supplies, and efficient response of the surveyed centers in Saudi Arabia.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Component Removal/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Quarantine , Saudi Arabia
3.
Am Surg ; 88(3): 356-359, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501889

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic caused an abrupt change to societal norms. We anecdotally noticed an increase in penetrating and violent trauma during the period of stay-at-home orders. Studying these changes will allow trauma centers to better prepare for future waves of COVID-19 or other global catastrophes. METHODS: We queried our institutional database for all level 1 and 2 trauma activations presenting from the scene within our local county from March 18 to May 21, 2020 and matched time periods from 2016 to 2019. Primary outcomes were overall trauma volume, rates of penetrating trauma, rates of violent trauma, and transfusion requirements. RESULTS: The number of penetrating and violent traumas at our trauma center during the period of societal quarantine for the COVID-19 pandemic was more than any historical total. During the COVID-19 time period, we saw 39 penetrating traumas, while the mean value for the same time period from 2016 to 2019 was 26 (P = .03). We saw 45 violent traumas during COVID; the mean value from 2016 to 2019 was 32 (P = .05). There was also a higher rate of trauma patients requiring transfusion in the COVID cohort (6.7% vs 12.2%). DISCUSSION: Societal quarantine increased the number of penetrating and violent traumas, with a concurrent increased percentage of patients transfused. Despite this, there was no change in outcomes. Given the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic, quarantine measures could be re-implemented. Data from this study can help guide expectations and utilization of hospital resources in the future.


Subject(s)
Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds, Nonpenetrating/epidemiology , Wounds, Penetrating/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Arkansas/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine , Sex Distribution , Time Factors , Violence/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256330, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376624

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has proved to have an indirect impact on essential health services in several parts of the world which could lead to increased morbidity and mortality and loss of the gains made in the past decades. There were no synthesized scientific evidences which could show the impact of COVID-19 epidemics/pandemic on essential health services in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the impacts of COVID-19 epidemics/pandemic on essential health services provision in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. METHODS: A pre-post study design was used to assess the impacts of COVID-19 on essential health services delivery in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia in the second quarter of 2020 (Post COVID-19) compared to similar quarter in 2019 (Pre COVID-19). The study focuses on five categories; namely; maternal, neonatal and child health care; communicable diseases with a focus on HIV and TB-HIV co-infection; prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV; basic emergency, outpatient, inpatient and blood bank services, non-communicable diseases and road traffic accidents (RTAs). Analysis was done using Stata version 14.0 software package. The effects of COVID-19 epidemics/pandemic were calculated taking the differences between post COVID -19 and pre COVID-19 periods and the levels of service disruptions presented using proportions. Wilcoxon sign rank test was done and a significance level of ≤0.05 was considered as having significant difference among the two quarters. RESULTS: There were significant increase in institutional delivery, delivery by Caesarian Section (CS), still birth, postnatal care within 7 days of delivery, the number of children who received all vaccine doses before 1st birthday, the number of under 5 children screened and had moderate acute malnutrition, the number of under 5 children screened and had severe acute malnutrition and children with SAM admitted for management. However, there were significant decrease in HIV testing and detection along with enrolment to antiretroviral therapy (ART) care, number of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk ≥ 30% received treatment, RTAs, total units of blood received from national blood transfusion service (NBTS) and regional blood banks, total number of units of blood transfused and emergency referral. There were no significant changes in outpatient visits and admissions. CONCLUSION: Despite commendable achievements in maintaining several of the essential health services, COVID-19 has led to an increase in under nutrition in under five children, decline in HIV detection and care, CVD, cervical cancer screening and blood bank services. Therefore, governments, local and international agencies need to introduce innovative ways to rapidly expand and deliver services in the context of COVID-19. Moreover, lower income countries have to customize comprehensive and coordinated community-based health care approaches, including outreach and campaigns. In addition, countries should ensure that NCDs are incorporated in their national COVID-19 response plans to provide essential health care services to people living with NCDs and HIV or HIV-TB co-infection during the COVID-19 pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Ethiopia , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Pandemics , Postnatal Care , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
6.
Transfusion ; 61 Suppl 2: S36-S43, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358634

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted healthcare services worldwide. However, little has been reported regarding the impact on blood utilization. We quantified the impact of COVID-19 on blood utilization and discards among facilities reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network Hemovigilance Module. METHODS: Facilities continuously reporting data, during January 2016-June 2020, on transfused and discarded blood components, stratified by component type (red blood cells [RBC], platelets, and plasma), were included. Interrupted time-series analysis with generalized estimating equations, adjusting for facility surgical volume and seasonality, was used to quantify changes in blood utilization and discards relative to a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services notification delaying nonessential medical procedures (March 2020). RESULTS: Seventy-two facilities included in the analyses, on average, transfused 44,548 and discarded 2,202 blood components monthly. Following the March 2020 notification and after multivariable adjustment, RBC and platelet utilization declined, -9.9% (p < .001) and -13.6% (p = .014), respectively. Discards increased for RBCs (30.2%, p = .047) and platelets (60.4%, p = .002). No statistically significant change in plasma was found. Following these abrupt changes, blood utilization and discards rebounded toward baseline with RBC utilization increasing by 5.7% (p < .001), and platelet and RBC discards decreasing -16.4% (<0.001) and -12.7 (p = .001), respectively. CONCLUSION: Following notification delaying elective surgical procedures, blood utilization declined substantially while blood discards increased, resulting in substantial wastage of blood products. Ongoing and future pandemic response efforts should consider the impact of interventions on blood supply and demand to ensure blood availability.


Subject(s)
Blood Safety , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Data Collection , Delivery of Health Care , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United States/epidemiology
8.
Vox Sang ; 116(5): 574-580, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has affected almost all hospital departments, including transfusion services. However, the demand for transfusions in a general hospital designated to deal with COVID-19 patients has not been analysed before. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate blood transfusion practices from 15 March to 14 April 2020 at Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor (Madrid, Spain). During this month, with few exceptions, the hospital became a 'COVID-19' centre. In addition, transfusion rates during this time frame and the same period over the last 4 years were compared. RESULTS: From 15 March to 14 April 2020, only 254 blood components were transfused, resulting in a 49·3% reduction over the previous year. Interestingly, in critically ill patients, the red blood cell (RBC) transfusion/bed ratio significantly decreased during this period (0·92) compared to the same ratio over the past 4 years (2·70) (P = 0·02). Of note, 106 blood components (95 RBC; 11 platelet concentrates) were transfused to only 36 out of 1348 COVID-19 patients (2·7%). The main reason for RBC transfusion in COVID-19 patients was a previous underlying disease (44%) followed by bleeding (25%) and inflammatory anaemia (25%). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to report a decrease in blood transfusions during the COVID-19 pandemic in a general hospital and especially in the intensive care unit. The results of this study suggest that COVID-19 does not generally induce transfusion requiring anaemia, being the main causes for transfusion in these patients underlying conditions or bleeding.


Subject(s)
Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitals, General/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/methods , Blood Transfusion/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Spain
10.
Transfusion ; 61(7): 2075-2081, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Blood usage and collections were impacted throughout 2020 both by the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as public health decisions affecting hospital operations. We sought to understand the longer-term effects of the pandemic on blood usage via changes in case volume and clinical intensity as well as whether the blood needs of COVID-19-positive patients differed from other transfused patients. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A single-center retrospective study of blood use in 2020 as compared to 2014-2019 was conducted at a tertiary care center. Statistical analysis was performed in an R-based workflow. p values are reported using two-sided t-tests for total hospital blood usage and using Mann-Whitney U tests for comparisons of patient blood usage. RESULTS: Mean monthly red cell usage in 2020 decreased by 11.2% (p = .003), plasma usage decreased by 23.8%, (p < .001) platelet usage decreased by 11.4% (p < .001), and monthly cryoprecipitate use increased by 18% (p = .03). A linear regression model predicted significant associations between total blood usage and the year, number of Medicare eligible discharges, and Case Mix Index. COVID-19-positive patients requiring at least one blood product did not use significantly different amounts of red cells, plasma, or platelets from all other transfused patients. CONCLUSIONS: Year 2020 began with decreased blood usage that was normalized by late spring. Reassuringly, transfused COVID-19-positive patients in general and those requiring ICU level care do not use significantly increased amounts of blood as compared to similar transfused hospital patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Blood Transfusion/methods , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Maryland/epidemiology , Public Health Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Am J Emerg Med ; 48: 140-147, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157085

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We investigated the impact of anemia based on admission hemoglobin (Hb) level as a prognostic risk factor for severe outcomes in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted from a random sample of 733 adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) obtained from a total of 4356 laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 cases who presented to the Emergency Department of Montefiore Medical Center between March-June 2020. The primary outcome was a composite endpoint of in-hospital severe outcomes of COVID-19. A secondary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Among the 733 patients included in our final analysis, 438 patients (59.8%) presented with anemia. 105 patients (14.3%) had mild, and 333 patients (45.5%) had moderate-severe anemia. Overall, 437 patients (59.6%) had a composite endpoint of severe outcomes. On-admission anemia was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality, (Odds Ratio 1.52, 95% CI [1.01-2.30], p = 0.046) but not for composite severe outcomes. However, moderate-severe anemia (Hb < 11 g/dL) on admission was independently associated with both severe outcomes (OR1.53, 95% CI [1.05-2.23], p = 0.028) and mortality (OR 1.67, 95% CI [1.09-2.56], p = 0.019) during hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Anemia on admission was independently associated with increased odds of all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Furthermore, moderate-severe anemia (Hb <11 g/dL) was an independent risk factor for severe COVID-19 outcomes. Moving forward, COVID-19 patient management and risk stratification may benefit from addressing anemia on admission.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Anemia/blood , COVID-19/blood , Hospital Mortality , Hypotension/epidemiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/epidemiology , Shock, Septic/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anemia/therapy , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Cohort Studies , Female , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Transfusion ; 61(3): 722-729, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084456

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Spikes in the demand for blood components represent a substantial challenge to transfusion services. Simple metrics for characterizing volatility in blood components within the hospital transfusion service have not been established. METHODS: We measured the volatility of demand for blood services at a large academic urban general hospital over a 6-month period from July 2019 to December 2019 prior to the SARS-CoV2 pandemic. RESULTS: Among 4416 consecutive hours assessed, there were 693 h (16%) with spikes in demand for blood components with a mean (sd) of 3.8 (2.7) spikes/day. Spikes in demand were frequently clustered. The median number of hours between spikes differed by shift (6 h for days; 3 h for evenings; 3 h for nights). The percentage of shift hours with demand spikes also differed (9% day; 19% evening; 18% night). During the study, 32,447 components were distributed to 19,431 patients. Of these, 11,819 components (36%) were distributed during hours of peak demand. Hours with a simultaneous spike in both component demand and patient demand occurred in 5% of hours or approximately once each day. CONCLUSION: Demand for transfusion services was highly volatile in an unpredictable fashion. We provide an approach that could be used to benchmark spikes in demand for blood services at hospitals. Consideration of the frequency, unpredictability, and magnitude of spikes in demand may be relevant for hemovigilance programs and for strategies to determine the laboratory staffing needed for good patient care.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/therapy , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Blood Safety , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , Hospitals , Humans , Time Factors , Volatilization
13.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(1): 60-67, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065637

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: With the advent of COVID-19 in Pakistan, the already fragmented blood transfusion services (BTS) received a severe blow, putting the lives of transfusion-dependent thalassemia children on stake. This study aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 on blood transfusion therapy (BTT) of thalassemia patients and suggest ways to ensure safe and reliable blood supplies amid such health crises. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2019 (before COVID-19) to July 2020 (during COVID-19) based on the data provided by a thalassemia center, named Help International Welfare Trust, Karachi, Pakistan. SPSS version 24.0 was used for the data analysis. Data were described in the form of means and percentages. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the consumption of PRBCs bags after the emergence of COVID-19 (P=0.002). Moreover, the number of thalassemia patients receiving BTT was dropped by 10.56% during the pandemic. There was a strong negative correlation observed between the rising cases of COVID-19 in Pakistan and the number of patients missing their therapy sessions (r=-0.914, P=0.030). A considerable decline in the reserves of all Rhesus-negative blood groups amid the COVID-19 outbreak was also observed. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic adversely affected the already suboptimal care catered to thalassemia patients in Karachi, Pakistan. The fear of the virus contraction coupled with the lockdown and restricted mobility has disrupted the entire transfusion chain from donor to the recipient. Collaborated efforts by the government and healthcare authorities are essential to ensure sufficient blood for thalassemia patients amid the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , beta-Thalassemia/therapy , Adolescent , Blood Grouping and Crossmatching , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Pakistan/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Compliance , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Retrospective Studies , Rural Population , beta-Thalassemia/epidemiology
14.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(1): 68-72, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065636

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ensuring steady stream of safe blood is the ultimate goal of blood transfusion practice. The current COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost every part of life and economy. Consequently, this study sets off to assess the effect of the pandemic on blood supply and blood transfusion in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital. METHODS: Data from the Donor Clinic and Blood Group Serology Unit of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital were retrospectively extracted to evaluate supply and use of blood before and during COVID-19 pandemic. RESULT: A total of 1638 donors were recorded within the study period. Age range 15-29 and 30-44 years constituted majority of the subjects (58.9% and 33.4%, respectively). The donor pool were male-dominated. Commercial donors (61.7%) and family replacement donors (30.6%) constituted majority of the donor pool. Most of the donor pool were students (37.1%), public servants (22.8%) and artisans (18.6%). A concomitant decrease of 26.1% and 18.9% were recorded in blood donation and request during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: Blood supply was not significantly affected in our study center as both requests and donations decreased. Consideration for improving family replacement donation was advised.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Blood Donors/psychology , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Transfusion/economics , Blood Transfusion/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family , Female , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Motivation , Nigeria , Occupations , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Remuneration , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
15.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(1): 16-24, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spurred a global health crisis. The safety and supply of blood during this pandemic has been a concern of blood banks and transfusion services as it is expected to adversely affect blood system activities. We aim to assess the situation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) during the first months of the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey was designed to address blood supply, transfusion demand, and donor management during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Medical directors of different blood banks were invited to participate. RESULTS: A total of 16 centers participated with representation from 15/19 countries in the region. In total, 75% were from national blood banks. Most centres had a decrease in the blood supply, ranging from 26-50%. Representatives from 14 countries (93.3%) believed that public fear has contributed to a decrease in donations. Most centres (n=12, 75%) had a reduction in transfusion demand, while those who did not, reported heavy involvement in treating patients with underlying haemoglobinopathies and haematological malignancies. Half of the centres activated their contingency plans. Four centres had to alter the blood donor eligibility criteria to meet demands. All centres implemented donor deferral criteria in relation to SARS-CoV-2, but were variable in measures to mitigate the risk of donor and staff exposure. CONCLUSION: Blood services in the region faced variable degrees of blood shortages. We summarize lessons learnt during this pandemic for the blood banks to consider to plan, assess, and respond proportionately to future similar pandemics.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Africa, Northern , Blood Banks/organization & administration , Blood Donors/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Donor Selection/standards , Health Care Surveys , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Hemoglobinopathies/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Mediterranean Region , Middle East , Pakistan , Professional-Patient Relations
16.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e040273, 2021 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032967

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Blood transfusion and anaemia are frequent and are associated with poor outcomes in patients with hip fracture (HF). We hypothesised that preoperative intravenous iron and tranexamic acid (TXA) may reduce the transfusion rate in these patients. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The HiFIT study is a multicentre, 2×2 factorial, randomised, double-blinded, controlled trial evaluating the effect of iron isomaltoside (IIM) (20 mg/kg) vs placebo and of TXA (intravenously at inclusion and topically during surgery) versus placebo on transfusion rate during hospitalisation, in patients undergoing emergency surgery for HF and having a preoperative haemoglobin between 95 and 130 g/L. 780 patients are expected. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients receiving an allogenic blood transfusion of packed red blood cells from the day of surgery until hospital discharge (or until D30 if patient is still hospitalised). Enrolment started on March 2017 in 11 French hospitals. The study was stopped between July 2017 and August 2018 (because of investigation of serious AEs with IIM in Spain) and slowed down since March 2020 (COVID-19 crisis). The expected date of final follow-up is May 2022. Analyses of the intent-to-treat and per-protocol populations are planned. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The HiFIT trial protocol has been approved by the Ethics Committee of Comité de Protection des Personnes Ouest II and the French authorities (ANSM). It will be carried out according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the Good Clinical Practice guidelines. The results will be disseminated through presentation at scientific conferences and publication in peer-reviewed journals. The HiFIT trial will be the largest study evaluating iron and TXA in patients with HF. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: clinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02972294; EudraCT Number 2016-003087-40.


Subject(s)
Anemia/drug therapy , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Hip Fractures/surgery , Iron/therapeutic use , Tranexamic Acid/therapeutic use , Administration, Intravenous , Antifibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Loss, Surgical/prevention & control , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Double-Blind Method , France , Hemoglobins/analysis , Hip Fractures/complications , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Preoperative Care/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
17.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e209-e217, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003130

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The occurrence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has overwhelmed the blood supply chain worldwide and severely influenced clinical procedures with potential massive blood loss, such as clipping surgery for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Whether acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is safe and effective in aneurysm clipping remains largely unknown. METHODS: Patients with aSAH who underwent clipping surgery within 72 hours from bleeding were included. The patients in the ANH group received 400 mL autologous blood collection, and the blood was returned as needed during surgery. The relationships between ANH and perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, postoperative outcome, and complications were analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients with aSAH were included between December 2019 and June 2020 (20 in the ANH group and 42 in the non-ANH group). ANH did not reduce the need of perioperative blood transfusion (3 [15%] vs. 5 [11.9%]; P = 0.734). However, ANH significantly increased serum hemoglobin levels on postoperative day 1 (11.5 ± 2.5 g/dL vs. 10.3 ± 2.0 g/dL; P = 0.045) and day 3 (12.1 ± 2.0 g/dL vs. 10.7 ± 1.3 g/dL; P = 0.002). Multivariable analysis indicated that serum hemoglobin level on postoperative day 1 (odds ratio, 0.895; 95% confidence interval, 0.822-0.973; P = 0.010) was an independent risk factor for unfavorable outcome, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that it had a comparable predictive power to World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade (Z = 0.275; P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: ANH significantly increased postoperative hemoglobin levels, and it may hold the potential to improve patients' outcomes. Routine use of ANH should be considered in aneurysm clipping surgery.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery , Blood Transfusion, Autologous/methods , Bloodless Medical and Surgical Procedures/methods , Hemodilution/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/surgery , Adult , Aged , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Female , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perioperative Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Instruments
19.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 43(8): e1073-e1076, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960645

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: When the COVID-19 epidemic occurred for the first time in December 2019, the governments worldwide took some restriction measures for slowing the spread of novel coronavirus. Eventually, there was a considerable decrease in volunteer blood donations. Regular transfusions and follow-up of patients with thalassemia major (TM) should be maintained during this period. It is possible that the treatment of the patients with TM may hinder due to the difficulty of reaching the treatment center and the difficulty of blood supply. Thus, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether there were any differences in the follow-up and treatment of the patients with TM during the outbreak. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients with TM who were followed up in our center without COVID-19 contact history and symptoms were included in this study. The demographic features and red blood cell volume per kilogram they received, pretransfusion hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF) level, biochemical parameters, and transfusion interval were recorded. The difference between the arithmetic mean of the data before and during the pandemic was evaluated. RESULTS: In this study, 61 patients with TM (32 males/29 females, mean age 13.9±6.8 y) were evaluated. The mean pretransfusion hemoglobin value was 9.14±0.77 g/dL and 8.87± 0.80 g/dL before and during the pandemic, respectively (P=0.023). There was no difference between before and during the pandemic concerning transfusion interval and transfusion volume. However, SF levels increased above 1000 ng/mL in 16.6% of patients. CONCLUSION: Although blood donation decreased significantly during the pandemic, it was observed in this study that the blood needs of patients with TM could be provided. The results of the SF level showed that the management of chelation therapy should be more meticulous. However, we should be ready for the challenges in the transfusion practice of patients with TM due to fluctuations in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , beta-Thalassemia/therapy , Adolescent , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Compliance , Turkey/epidemiology , beta-Thalassemia/pathology
20.
Transfus Med ; 31(3): 160-166, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-955504

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated how the Severe Acute Respiratory disease from Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) epidemic impacted transfusion services, transfusion support required by Covid-19 patients and their clinical outcome. BACKGROUND: In Italy, the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 infection was registered on 21 February 2020. As of 20 April, about 250 000 cases were registered, 1143 of which were in the province of Pescara. METHODS: We compared transfusion services provided by the blood centre of Pescara between 1 March and 20 April 2019 and between 1 March and 20 April 2020. We assessed the number and type of blood components donated, those transfused in the various hospital departments and those transfused to Covid-19 patients. RESULTS: Compared to 2019, we documented a decrease of 32% in the number of donations. The number of transfusions increased by 139% in the infectious diseases department (IDD), dedicated to Covid-19 patients, and by 76% in the intensive care unit (ICU), whereas it markedly decreased in the other departments. Of 299 patients with Covid-19, 60 were transfused (20.1%). Transfused patients in the ICU were significantly younger than those in IDD and had a lower number of lymphocytes, lower post-transfusion increment of haemoglobin levels and higher D-dimer and C reactive protein values. Mortality rate was 60.7% among transfused patients in the ICU and 39.0% among those in the IDD (p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: The Covid-19 epidemic had a profound impact on transfusion activities. The important blood demand for Covid-19 patients was satisfied because of the reduction in activities in other hospital wards. Covid-19-positive transfused patients showed a very poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Blood Banks/statistics & numerical data , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome
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