Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 24
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(12): 1706-1712, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356306

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Risk factors for seriously ill coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) patients have been reported in several studies. However, to date, few studies have reported simple risk assessment tools for distinguishing patients becoming severely ill after initial diagnosis. Hence, this study aimed to develop a simple clinical risk nomogram predicting oxygenation risk in patients with COVID-19 at the first triage. METHODS: This retrospective study involved a chart review of the medical records of 84 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 between February 2020 and March 2021 at ten medical facilities. The patients were divided into requiring no oxygen therapy (non-severe group) and requiring oxygen therapy (severe group). Patient characteristics were compared between the two groups. We utilized univariate logistic regression analysis to confirm determinants of high risks of requiring oxygen therapy in patients with moderate COVID-19. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients ware in severe group and forty-nine patients were in non-severe group. In comparison with patients in the non-severe group, patients in the severe group were significantly older with higher body mass index (BMI), and had a history of hypertension and diabetes. Serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in the severe group. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, higher BMI, and higher BUN levels were significantly associated with oxygen requirements. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that age, BMI, and BUN were independent risk factors in the moderate-to-severe COVID-19 group. Elderly patients with higher BMI and BUN require close monitoring and early treatment initiation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , Body Mass Index , Humans , Oxygen , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Virol J ; 18(1): 117, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, specific cytokines associated with development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and extrapulmonary multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) in COVID-19 patients have not been systematically described. We determined the levels of inflammatory cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and their relationships with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data of 94 COVID-19 patients with and without ARDS were analyzed. The levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α]) were measured on days 1, 3, and 5 following admission. Seventeen healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. Correlations in the levels of inflammatory cytokines with clinical and laboratory variables were analyzed, furthermore, we also explored the relationships of different cytokines with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. RESULTS: The ARDS group had higher serum levels of all 4 inflammatory cytokines than the controls, and these levels steadily increased after admission. The ARDS group also had higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 than the non-ARDS group, and the levels of these cytokines correlated significantly with coagulation parameters and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The levels of IL-6 and TNF-α correlated with the levels of creatinine and urea nitrogen, and were also higher in ARDS patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). All 4 inflammatory cytokines had negative correlations with PaO2/FiO2. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α had positive correlations with the APACHE-II score. Relative to survivors, non-survivors had higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 at admission, and increasing levels over time. CONCLUSIONS: The cytokine storm apparently contributed to the development of ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD in COVID-19 patients. The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 correlated with DIC, and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with AKI. Relative to survivors, patients who died within 28 days had increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/pathology , Creatinine/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 8864, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242039

ABSTRACT

Syndecan-1 (SDC-1) is found in the endothelial glycocalyx and shed into the blood during systemic inflammatory conditions. We investigated organ dysfunction associated with changing serum SDC-1 levels for early detection of organ dysfunction in critically ill patients. To evaluate the effect of SDC-1 on laboratory parameters measured the day after SDC-1 measurement with consideration for repeated measures, linear mixed effects models were constructed with each parameter as an outcome variable. A total of 94 patients were enrolled, and 831 samples were obtained. Analysis using mixed effects models for repeated measures with adjustment for age and sex showed that serum SDC-1 levels measured the day before significantly affected several outcomes, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), creatinine (CRE), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), antithrombin III, fibrin degradation products, and D-dimer. Moreover, serum SDC-1 levels of the prior day significantly modified the effect between time and several outcomes, including AST, ALT, CRE, and BUN. Additionally, increasing serum SDC-1 level was a significant risk factor for mortality. Serum SDC-1 may be a useful biomarker for daily monitoring to detect early signs of kidney, liver and coagulation system dysfunction, and may be an important risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Syndecan-1/blood , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Urea Nitrogen , Creatinine/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(18): e25819, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216695

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Respiratory failure is the major cause of death in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Data on factors affecting the need for oxygen therapy in early-stage COVID-19 are limited. This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with the need for oxygen therapy in patients with COVID-19.This is a retrospective study of consecutive COVID-19 patients who were hospitalized between February 27 and June 28, 2020, in South Korea. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the factors associated with the need for oxygen therapy.Of the 265 patients included in the study, 26 (9.8%) received oxygen therapy, and 7 of these patients (29.2%) were transferred to a step-up facility, and 3 (11.5%) died. The median age of all patients was 46 years (IQR, 30-60 years), and the median modified early warning score at admission was 1 (IQR, 1-2). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, being a current smoker (odds ratio [OR] 7.641, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.686-34.630, P = .008), heart rate (OR 1.053, 95% CI 1.010-1.097, P = .014), aspartate aminotransferase values (OR 1.049, 95% CI 1.008-1.092, P = .020), blood urea nitrogen levels (OR 1.171, 95% CI 1.073-1.278, P < .001), and chest radiographic findings (OR 3.173, 95% CI 1.870-5.382, P < .001) were associated with oxygen therapy.In patients with less severe COVID-19, the need for oxygen therapy is affected by smoking and elevated values of aspartate aminotransferase and blood urea nitrogen. Further research is warranted on the risk factors for deterioration in COVID-19 to efficiently allocate medical resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Smoking/adverse effects
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 786-793, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206797

ABSTRACT

We aimed to examine independent predictive factors for the severity and survival of COVID-19 disease, from routine blood parameters, especially the blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine (Cr) ratio. A total of 139 patients with COVID-19 were investigated at Siirt State Hospital. According to the disease severity, the patients were categorized as three groups (moderate: 85, severe: 54, and critical: 20). Then, patients were divided into two groups: nonsevere (moderate) and severe (severe and critical). Demographic, clinical data, and routine blood parameters were analyzed. In multivariate model adjusted for potential confounders BUN/Cr ratio (odds ratio [OR] = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-2.40; P = .002) and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.20-4.30; P < .001) were independent predictive factors for disease severity. In multivariate Cox proportional hazard model BUN/Cr ratio (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; P = .030), and NLR (HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.06-1.30; P = .020) were independent predictors for survival of COVID-19 disease. The optimal thresholds of the BUN/Cr ratio at 33.5 and 51.7 had the superior possibility for severe disease and mortality, area under the curve (AUC) were 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. The optimal thresholds of NLR at 3.27 and 5.72 had a superior possibility for severe disease and mortality, AUC were 0.87 and 0.85, respectively. BUN/Cr and NLR are independent predictors for COVID-19 patient severity and survival. Routine evaluation of BUN/Cr and NLR can help identify high-risk cases with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/diagnosis , Creatinine/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis , Turkey
6.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107697, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Toward the end of December 2019, a novel type of coronavirus (2019-nCoV) broke out in Wuhan, China. Here, the hematological characteristics of patients with severe and critical 2019-nCoV pneumonia in intensive care unit (ICU) were investigated, which may provide the necessary basis for its diagnosis and treatment. METHODS: We collected data on patients with confirmed 2019-nCoV pneumonia in the ICU of Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan from February 25 to April 2, 2020. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the presence of 2019-nCoV, and various hematological characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: All patients tested positive for 2019-nCoV using nasopharyngeal swabs or sputum after admission, and interstitial pneumonia findings were noted on chest computed tomography. Sex, age and comorbidities were not significantly different between the severe and critical groups. In terms of prognosis, the survival rate of patients in the severe group reached 100%, whereas that of patients in the critical group was only 13.33% after positive treatment. Furthermore, lymphocyte percentage, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, D-dimer, myohemoglobin, procalcitonin, and IL-6 levels were high-risk factors for disease progression in critical patients. Finally, lymphocyte percentage and blood urea nitrogen, calcium, myohemoglobin, and IL-6 levels were closely associated with patient prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: 2019-nCoV pneumonia should be considered a systemic disease. Patients with more complications were more likely to develop critical disease. Lymphocyte percentage and blood urea nitrogen, calcium, myohemoglobin, and IL-6 levels can be monitored to prevent progression critical disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Intensive Care Units , Adult , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/mortality , Calcium/blood , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Logistic Models , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin/blood , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
7.
Am J Emerg Med ; 48: 33-37, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163282

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the high mortality and spread rates of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there are currently serious challenges in emergency department management. As such, we investigated whether the blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/albumin ratio (BAR) predicts mortality in the COVID-19 patients in the emergency department. METHODS: A total of 602 COVID-19 patients who were brought to the emergency department within the period from March to September 2020 were included in the study. The BUN level, albumin level, BAR, age, gender, and in-hospital mortality status of the patients were recorded. The patients were grouped by in-hospital mortality. Statistical comparison was conducted between the groups. RESULTS: Of the patients who were included in the study, 312(51.8%) were male, and their median age was 63 years (49-73). There was in-hospital mortality in 96(15.9%) patients. The median BUN and BAR values of the patients in the non-survivor group were significantly higher than those in the survivor group (BUN: 24.76 [17.38-38.31] and 14.43 [10.84-20.42], respectively [p < 0.001]; BAR: 6.7 [4.7-10.1] and 3.4 [2.5-5.2], respectively [p < 0.001]). The mean albumin value in the non-survivor group was significantly lower than that in the survivor group (3.60 ± 0.58 and 4.13 ± 0.51, respectively; p < 0.001). The area-under-the-curve (AUC) and odds ratio values obtained by BAR to predict in-hospital COVID-19 mortality were higher than the values obtained by BUN and albumin (AUC of BAR, BUN, and albumin: 0.809, 0.771, and 0.765, respectively; odds ratio of BAR>3.9, BUN>16.05, and albumin<4.01: 10.448, 7.048, and 6.482, respectively). CONCLUSION: The BUN, albumin, and BAR levels were found to be reliable predictors of in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients, but BAR was found to be a more reliable predictor than the BUN and albumin levels.


Subject(s)
Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospital Mortality , Serum Albumin/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Turkey/epidemiology
8.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(1): 672-680, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) has largely abated in China; however, sporadic or imported cases are still a concern, while in other countries, the COVID-19 pandemic persists as a major health crisis. METHODS: All patients enrolled in this study were diagnosed with COVID-19 from February 21, 2020 to April 14, 2020 in Wuhan. We retrospectively analyzed the patients admitted to the ICU (137 patients) and general wards (114 patients) of Wuhan Leishenshan Hospital in China. The population characteristics, symptoms, and laboratory examination results between the patients in the ICU and those in the general wards were compared. Furthermore, the differences between the deceased patients in the ICU and those discharged from the ICU were compared. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the two groups in terms of symptoms, including fever, shortness of breath, no presence of complications, presence of 1 complication, and presence of 3 or more complications (P<0.05). There were also significant differences between the patients in terms of the laboratory examination results including elevated urea nitrogen, creatinine, direct bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, total protein, albumin, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, procalcitonin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, white blood cells, C-reactive protein, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, D-dimer, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, interleukin 2 receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α, troponin I, phosphokinase isoenzyme-MB, and B-type natriuretic peptide; and decreased platelets, lymphocyte absolute value, and eosinophil absolute value (<0.05). There were 45 patients who died in ICU and 57 improved and discharged patients. There were significant differences between the two groups in the number of patients that had 1 complication and 3 or more complications (P<0.05). There were also significant differences in the laboratory examination results between the patients including elevated urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, procalcitonin, white blood cells, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, phosphokinase isoenzyme-MB, and B-type natriuretic peptide; and decreased platelets and eosinophil absolute value (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight that the identified determinants may help to improve treatment of COVID-19 patients, to predict the risk of developing severe illness and to optimizing arrangement of health resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Bilirubin/blood , Blood Cell Count , Blood Coagulation Tests , Blood Proteins/analysis , Blood Sedimentation , Blood Urea Nitrogen , Creatine Kinase/blood , Creatinine/analysis , Cytokines/blood , Female , Fever/virology , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Procalcitonin/blood , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
10.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244779, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, the SARS-CoV-2 promptly spread across China and around the world. However, there are controversies about whether preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury complication (AKI) are involved in the COVID-19 pandemic. MEASUREMENTS: Studies reported the kidney outcomes in different severity of COVID-19 were included in this study. Standardized mean differences or odds ratios were calculated by employing Review Manager meta-analysis software. RESULTS: Thirty-six trials were included in this systematic review with a total of 6395 COVID-19 patients. The overall effects indicated that preexisting CKD (OR = 3.28), complication of AKI (OR = 11.02), serum creatinine (SMD = 0.68), abnormal serum creatinine (OR = 4.86), blood urea nitrogen (SMD = 1.95), abnormal blood urea nitrogen (OR = 6.53), received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (OR = 23.63) were significantly increased in severe group than that in nonsevere group. Additionally, the complication of AKI (OR = 13.92) and blood urea nitrogen (SMD = 1.18) were remarkably elevated in the critical group than that in the severe group. CONCLUSIONS: CKD and AKI are susceptible to occur in patients with severe COVID-19. CRRT is applied frequently in severe COVID-19 patients than that in nonsevere COVID-19 patients. The risk of AKI is higher in the critical group than that in the severe group.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/blood , China/epidemiology , Creatinine/blood , Humans , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/blood , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
11.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(24): 13065-13071, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000853

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Whether patients with COVID-19 require invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) is not yet clear. This article summarizes the clinical treatment process and clinical data of patients with COVID-19 and analyzes the predictive factors for mechanical ventilation for these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out from January 5, 2020, to March 23, 2020, including 98 patients with COVID-19 treated at three designated hospitals in Huangshi City, Hubei Province. Data collection included demographics, previous underlying diseases, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, imaging examination results, diagnosis, and prognosis. This study presents a summary of the patients' overall clinical characteristics and clarifies the predictive factors for MV in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: There were 56 males and 42 females included in this study. The mortality rate was 26.53% (26/98). Fever, cough, and chest tightness were the most common symptoms (64.3%, 37.8%, and 12.2%, respectively). Thirty cases required MV, 30.61% of the total cases, and the mortality rate was 73.33%. The univariate comparison showed that dyspnea, acute physiologic assessment, chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) score, and the ratio between arterial blood oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) and oxygen concentration (FiO2) (P/F) were statistically different between the MV group and the non-MV group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Results showed the following: dyspnea; increased white blood cell count; decreased platelets; lowered albumin levels; increased urea nitrogen; increased levels of myocardial enzymes Creatine Kinase (CK), Creatine Kinase, MB Form (CKMB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); increased lactate, and lowered blood calcium tests. These findings may indicate that the patients have an increased probability of needing MV support. A cutoff value for the initial APACHE II score of >11.5 and the initial PaO2/FiO2 ratio of <122.17 mmHg should be considered for MV support for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Oxygen/blood , Partial Pressure , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , APACHE , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Creatine Kinase/blood , Creatine Kinase, MB Form/blood , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Hypoalbuminemia/blood , Hypocalcemia/blood , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Leukocytosis/blood , Male , Middle Aged , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/blood
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(10): e2023934, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893183

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has placed unprecedented stress on health systems across the world, and reliable estimates of risk for adverse hospital outcomes are needed. Objective: To quantify admission laboratory and comorbidity features associated with critical illness and mortality risk across 6 Eastern Massachusetts hospitals. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of all individuals admitted to the hospital who tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by polymerase chain reaction across these 6 hospitals through June 5, 2020, using hospital course, prior diagnoses, and laboratory values in emergency department and inpatient settings from 2 academic medical centers and 4 community hospitals. The data were extracted on June 11, 2020, and the analysis was conducted from June to July 2020. Exposures: SARS-CoV-2. Main Outcomes and Measures: Severe illness defined by admission to intensive care unit, mechanical ventilation, or death. Results: Of 2511 hospitalized individuals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (of whom 50.9% were male, 53.9% White, and 27.0% Hispanic, with a mean [SD ]age of 62.6 [19.0] years), 215 (8.6%) were admitted to the intensive care unit, 164 (6.5%) required mechanical ventilation, and 292 (11.6%) died. L1-regression models developed in 3 of these hospitals yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.807 for severe illness and 0.847 for mortality in the 3 held-out hospitals. In total, 212 of 292 deaths (72.6%) occurred in the highest-risk mortality quintile. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort, specific admission laboratory studies in concert with sociodemographic features and prior diagnosis facilitated risk stratification among individuals hospitalized for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Critical Illness , Hospital Mortality/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/urine , Creatinine/analysis , Creatinine/blood , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Eosinophils , Erythrocyte Count/methods , Female , Glucose/analysis , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydro-Lyases/analysis , Hydro-Lyases/blood , Lymphocyte Count/methods , Male , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Monocytes , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Platelet Count/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Troponin T/analysis , Troponin T/blood
13.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 16726, 2020 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841180

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is commonly mild and self-limiting, but in a considerable portion of patients the disease is severe and fatal. Determining which patients are at high risk of severe illness or mortality is essential for appropriate clinical decision making. We propose a novel severity score specifically for COVID-19 to help predict disease severity and mortality. 4711 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were included. We derived a risk model using the first half of the cohort (n = 2355 patients) by logistic regression and bootstrapping methods. The discriminative power of the risk model was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). The severity score was validated in a second half of 2356 patients. Mortality incidence was 26.4% in the derivation cohort and 22.4% in the validation cohort. A COVID-19 severity score ranging from 0 to 10, consisting of age, oxygen saturation, mean arterial pressure, blood urea nitrogen, C-Reactive protein, and the international normalized ratio was developed. A ROC curve analysis was performed in the derivation cohort achieved an AUC of 0.824 (95% CI 0.814-0.851) and an AUC of 0.798 (95% CI 0.789-0.818) in the validation cohort. Furthermore, based on the risk categorization the probability of mortality was 11.8%, 39% and 78% for patient with low (0-3), moderate (4-6) and high (7-10) COVID-19 severity score. This developed and validated novel COVID-19 severity score will aid physicians in predicting mortality during surge periods.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Research Design , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arterial Pressure , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Scand J Clin Lab Invest ; 80(8): 611-618, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-780149

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 is a very fast-spreading infectious disease. Severe forms are marked by a high mortality rate. The objective of this study is to identify routine biomarkers that can serve as early predictors of the disease progression. This is a prospective, single-center, cohort study involving 330 SARS-CoV-2 infected patients who were admitted at the University Hospital of Blida, Algeria in the period between the 27th of March and 22nd of April 2020. The ROC curve was used to evaluate the predictive performance of biomarkers, assessed at admission, in the early warning of progression toward severity. Multivariate logistic regression was used to quantify the independent risk for each marker. After an average follow-up period of 13.9 ± 3.5 days, 143 patients (43.3%) were classified as severe cases. Six biological abnormalities were identified as potential risk markers independently related to the severity: elevated urea nitrogen (>8.0 mmol/L, OR = 9.3 [2.7-31.7], p < .00001), elevated CRP (>42mg/L, OR = 7.5 [2.4-23.3], p = .001), decreased natremia (<133. 6 mmol/L, OR = 6.0 [2.0-17.4], p = .001), decreased albumin (<33.5 g/L, OR = 5.2 [1.7-16.6], p = .003), elevated LDH (>367 IU/L, OR = 4.9 [1.7-14.2], p = .003) and elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (>7.99, OR = 4.2, [1.4-12.2], p = .009). These easy-to-measure, time-saving and very low-cost parameters have been shown to be effective in the early prediction of the COVID-19 severity. Their use at the early admission stage can improve the risk stratification and management of medical care resources in order to reduce the mortality rate.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Aged , Algeria , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Creatinine/blood , Female , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Sodium/blood
15.
Biomed Res Int ; 2020: 1594726, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633800

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of sepsis and has also been observed in some patients suffering from the new coronavirus pneumonia COVID-19, which is currently a major global concern. Thymoquinone (TQ) is one of the most active ingredients in Nigella sativa seeds. It has a variety of beneficial properties including anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities. Here, we investigated the possible protective effects of TQ against kidney damage in septic BALB/c mice. Eight-week-old male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control, TQ, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and TQ+CLP. CLP was performed after 2 weeks of TQ gavage. After 48 h, we measured the histopathological alterations in the kidney tissue and the serum levels of creatinine (CRE) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). We also evaluated pyroptosis (NLRP3, caspase-1), apoptosis (caspase-3, caspase-8), proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1ß, and IL-6)-related protein and gene expression levels. Our results demonstrated that TQ inhibited CLP-induced increased serum CRE and BUN levels. It also significantly inhibited the high levels of NLRP3, caspase-1, caspase-3, caspase-8, TNF-α, IL-1ß, and IL-6 induced by CLP. Furthermore, NF-κB protein level was significantly decreased in the TQ+CLP group than in the CLP group. Together, our results indicate that TQ may be a potential therapeutic agent for sepsis-induced AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Benzoquinones/therapeutic use , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , Betacoronavirus , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Creatinine/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Kidney/drug effects , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Int J Clin Pract ; 74(12): e13636, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745705

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The most common extra pulmonary organ dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome is acute kidney injury. Current data so far indicate low incidence of AKI in Covid-19 disease. OBJECTIVE: In this retrospective study, we analysed the clinical features of patients diagnosed with Covid-19 and investigated the effect of Covid-19 on kidney function. METHODS: Ninety-six patients diagnosed with Covid-19 were included in our study. Demographic features (Age, gender, co-morbidities), symptoms, thorax CT findings, Covid-19 PCR results and laboratory findings were recorded. The clinical features of the patients were analysed and kidney function values before Covid-19 diagnosis were compared with kidney function values after Covid-19 diagnosis. RESULTS: Most presenting symptom was fever (51%). Most accompanying co-morbidity was hypertension (56%). According to laboratory findings; ferritin, D-dimer and C-reactive protein levels were statistically significantly higher in ARDS group than severe pneumonia and pneumonia group (P = .002, P = .001 and P < .001, respectively). Also lymphocyte levels were statistically significantly lower in ARDS group than severe pneumonia and pneumonia group (P = .042). According to KDIGO criteria 3 (3.1%) patients had AKI during the hospital stay. For all patients, there was statistically significant difference between basal, 1st, 5th and 10th day BUN and SCr levels (P = .024 and P = .018, respectively). For severe pneumonia group there was statistically significant difference between basal, 1st, 5th and 10th day SCr levels (P = .045). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that Covid-19 can cause renal impairment both with pneumonia and ARDS. A large-scale prospective randomised studies are needed to reach final judgement about this topic.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/virology , COVID-19/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Adult , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
17.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 167: 108351, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664109

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), also referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is instigated by a novel coronavirus. The disease was initially reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Diabetes is a risk factor associated with adverse outcomes. Herein, our objective was to investigate the characteristics of laboratory findings of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This was a retrospective study and included 80 T2DM patients of Jinling Hospital from 2010 to 2020, as well as 76 COVID-19 patients without T2DM and 55 COVID-19 patients with T2DM who were treated at Huoshen hill Hospital from February 11 to March 18, 2020. We then compared the differences in laboratory test results between the three groups. RESULTS: The levels of lymphocytes, uric acid (UA), and globulin in the T2DM group were significantly higher. In contrast, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH)levels were lower than those in the COVID-19 (p < 0.05) and COVID-19 + T2DM groups (p < 0.05). No considerable difference was observed regarding the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), white blood cell (WBC), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), globulin, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in the three groups (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: T2DM patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 showed decreased levels of body mass index (BMI), lymphocytes, UA, and albumin, and increased CRP levels. The decreased BMI, UA, and albumin levels may be associated with oxidative stress response and nutritional consumption. The decreased lymphocyte counts and increased CRP levels may be related to the infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/metabolism , Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism , Betacoronavirus , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Creatinine/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Female , Globulins/metabolism , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin/metabolism , Uric Acid/metabolism
18.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 56(3): 106110, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-663165

ABSTRACT

The crude mortality rate in critical pneumonia cases with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) reaches 49%. This study aimed to test whether levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in combination with D-dimer were predictors of in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. The clinical characteristics of 305 COVID-19 patients were analysed and were compared between the survivor and non-survivor groups. Of the 305 patients, 85 (27.9%) died and 220 (72.1%) were discharged from hospital. Compared with discharged cases, non-survivor cases were older and their BUN and D-dimer levels were significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and multivariable Cox regression analyses identified BUN and D-dimer levels as independent risk factors for poor prognosis. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that elevated levels of BUN and D-dimer were associated with increased mortality (log-rank, P < 0.0001). The area under the curve for BUN combined with D-dimer was 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.97), with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 91%. Based on BUN and D-dimer levels on admission, a nomogram model was developed that showed good discrimination, with a concordance index of 0.94. Together, initial BUN and D-dimer levels were associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients. The combination of BUN ≥ 4.6 mmol/L and D-dimer ≥ 0.845 µg/mL appears to identify patients at high risk of in-hospital mortality, therefore it may prove to be a powerful risk assessment tool for severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Urea Nitrogen , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(13): 12504-12516, 2020 07 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640201

ABSTRACT

The mortality rate of elderly patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) was significantly higher than the overall mortality rate. However, besides age, leading death risk factors for the high mortality in elderly patients remain unidentified. This retrospective study included 210 elderly COVID-19 patients (aged ≥ 65 years), of whom 175 patients were discharged and 35 died. All deceased patients had at least one comorbidity. A significantly higher proportion of patients in the deceased group had cardiovascular diseases (49% vs. 20%), respiratory diseases (51% vs. 11%), chronic kidney disease (29% vs. 5%) and cerebrovascular disease (20% vs. 3%) than that in the discharged group. The median levels of C-reactive protein (125.8mg/L vs. 9.3mg/L) and blood urea nitrogen (7.2mmol/L vs. 4.4mmol/L) were significantly higher and median lymphocyte counts (0.7×109/L vs. 1.1×109/L) significantly lower in the deceased group than those in the discharged group. The survival curve analysis showed that higher C-reactive protein (≥5mg/L) plus any other abnormalities of lymphocyte, blood urea nitrogen or lactate dehydrogenase significantly predicted poor prognosis of COVID-19 infected elderly patients. This study revealed that the risk factors for the death in these elderly patients included comorbidities, increased levels of C-reactive protein and blood urea nitrogen, and lymphopenia during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , China , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 26(9): 1242-1247, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-637775

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since December 2019, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) that emerged in Wuhan city has spread rapidly around the world. The risk for poor outcome dramatically increases once a patient progresses to the severe or critical stage. The present study aims to investigate the risk factors for disease progression in individuals with mild to moderate COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study that included 1007 individuals with mild to moderate COVID-19 from three hospitals in Wuhan. Clinical characteristics and baseline laboratory findings were collected. Patients were followed up for 28 days for observation of disease progression. The end point was the progression to a more severe disease stage. RESULTS: During a follow up of 28 days, 720 patients (71.50%) had recovered or were symptomatically stable, 222 patients (22.05%) had progressed to severe disease, 22 patients (2.18%) had progressed to the critically ill stage and 43 patients (4.27%) had died. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models identified that increased age (hazard ratio (HR) 2.56, 95% CI 1.97-3.33), male sex (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.41-2.28), presence of hypertension (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.11-1.88), diabetes (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.35-2.44), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.38-2.93) and coronary artery disease (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.26-2.66) were risk factors for disease progression. History of smoking was protective against disease progression (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.91). Elevated procalcitonin (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.02-2.90), urea nitrogen (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.21-2.43), α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HR 3.02, 95% CI 1.26-7.21) and D-dimer (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.12-3.58) at baseline were also associated with risk for disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified a panel of risk factors for disease progression in individuals with mild to moderate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Disease Progression , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease , Diabetes Mellitus , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase/blood , Hypertension , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin/blood , Proportional Hazards Models , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Smoking , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...