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1.
Nat Neurosci ; 24(11): 1522-1533, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500484

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can damage cerebral small vessels and cause neurological symptoms. Here we describe structural changes in cerebral small vessels of patients with COVID-19 and elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the vascular pathology. In brains of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected individuals and animal models, we found an increased number of empty basement membrane tubes, so-called string vessels representing remnants of lost capillaries. We obtained evidence that brain endothelial cells are infected and that the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro) cleaves NEMO, the essential modulator of nuclear factor-κB. By ablating NEMO, Mpro induces the death of human brain endothelial cells and the occurrence of string vessels in mice. Deletion of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK) 3, a mediator of regulated cell death, blocks the vessel rarefaction and disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to NEMO ablation. Importantly, a pharmacological inhibitor of RIPK signaling prevented the Mpro-induced microvascular pathology. Our data suggest RIPK as a potential therapeutic target to treat the neuropathology of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Microvessels/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Cricetinae , Female , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Male , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Microvessels/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
2.
Nat Neurosci ; 24(11): 1522-1533, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483143

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can damage cerebral small vessels and cause neurological symptoms. Here we describe structural changes in cerebral small vessels of patients with COVID-19 and elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the vascular pathology. In brains of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected individuals and animal models, we found an increased number of empty basement membrane tubes, so-called string vessels representing remnants of lost capillaries. We obtained evidence that brain endothelial cells are infected and that the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro) cleaves NEMO, the essential modulator of nuclear factor-κB. By ablating NEMO, Mpro induces the death of human brain endothelial cells and the occurrence of string vessels in mice. Deletion of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK) 3, a mediator of regulated cell death, blocks the vessel rarefaction and disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to NEMO ablation. Importantly, a pharmacological inhibitor of RIPK signaling prevented the Mpro-induced microvascular pathology. Our data suggest RIPK as a potential therapeutic target to treat the neuropathology of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Microvessels/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Cricetinae , Female , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Male , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Microvessels/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
3.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2311: 185-193, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482181

ABSTRACT

Studies of blood-brain barrier (BBB) require developing of a novel and convenient in vitro endothelial cell model. We isolated primary human and rodent brain microvascular endothelial cells and developed methods for culturing, characterization, and high-efficiency transfection of endothelial cells. Here, we describe the improved methods to obtain in vitro human and rodent BBB models to study expression of endogenous and exogenous genes of interest.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/physiology , Brain/blood supply , Cell Separation , Endothelial Cells/physiology , Microvessels/cytology , Transfection , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Cell Culture Techniques , Cell Differentiation , Cell Proliferation , Cells, Cultured , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Fetus , Gestational Age , Humans , Mice , Rats
4.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463838

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), is currently infecting millions of people worldwide and is causing drastic changes in people's lives. Recent studies have shown that neurological symptoms are a major issue for people infected with SARS-CoV-2. However, the mechanism through which the pathological effects emerge is still unclear. Brain endothelial cells (ECs), one of the components of the blood-brain barrier, are a major hurdle for the entry of pathogenic or infectious agents into the brain. They strongly express angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) for its normal physiological function, which is also well-known to be an opportunistic receptor for SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, facilitating their entry into host cells. First, we identified rapid internalization of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) S1 domain (S1) and active trimer (Trimer) of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein through ACE2 in brain ECs. Moreover, internalized S1 increased Rab5, an early endosomal marker while Trimer decreased Rab5 in the brain ECs. Similarly, the permeability of transferrin and dextran was increased in S1 treatment but decreased in Trimer, respectively. Furthermore, S1 and Trimer both induced mitochondrial damage including functional deficits in mitochondrial respiration. Overall, this study shows that SARS-CoV-2 itself has toxic effects on the brain ECs including defective molecular delivery and metabolic function, suggesting a potential pathological mechanism to induce neurological signs in the brain.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Brain/metabolism , Brain/virology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Mice , Mitochondria/metabolism , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
5.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 337, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402050

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has been reported to show a capacity for invading the brains of humans and model animals. However, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Herein, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was occasionally detected in the vascular wall and perivascular space, as well as in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) in the infected K18-hACE2 transgenic mice. Moreover, the permeability of the infected vessel was increased. Furthermore, disintegrity of BBB was discovered in the infected hamsters by administration of Evans blue. Interestingly, the expression of claudin5, ZO-1, occludin and the ultrastructure of tight junctions (TJs) showed unchanged, whereas, the basement membrane was disrupted in the infected animals. Using an in vitro BBB model that comprises primary BMECs with astrocytes, SARS-CoV-2 was found to infect and cross through the BMECs. Consistent with in vivo experiments, the expression of MMP9 was increased and collagen IV was decreased while the markers for TJs were not altered in the SARS-CoV-2-infected BMECs. Besides, inflammatory responses including vasculitis, glial activation, and upregulated inflammatory factors occurred after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Overall, our results provide evidence supporting that SARS-CoV-2 can cross the BBB in a transcellular pathway accompanied with basement membrane disrupted without obvious alteration of TJs.


Subject(s)
Basement Membrane/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Basement Membrane/pathology , Basement Membrane/virology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/genetics , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tight Junctions/genetics , Tight Junctions/pathology , Tight Junctions/virology , Vero Cells
6.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 890: 173648, 2021 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385504

ABSTRACT

In an attempt to search for selective inhibitors against the SARS-CoV-2 which caused devastating of lives and livelihoods across the globe, 415 natural metabolites isolated from several plants, fungi and bacteria, belonging to different classes, were investigated. The drug metabolism and safety profiles were computed in silico and the results showed seven compounds namely fusaric acid, jasmonic acid, jasmonic acid methyl ester, putaminoxin, putaminoxin B and D, and stagonolide K were predicted to having considerable absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion parameters (ADME) and safety indices. Molecular docking against the receptor binding domain (RBD) of spike glycoprotein (S1) and the main protease (Mpro) exposed the compounds having better binding affinity to main protease as compared to the S1 receptor binding domain. The docking results were compared to an antiviral drug penciclovir reportedly of clinical significance in treating the SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. The results demonstrated the test compounds jasmonic acid, putaminoxins B and D bound to the HIS-CYS catalytic dyad as well as to other residues within the MPro active site with much greater affinity than penciclovir. The findings of the study suggest that these compounds could be explored as potential SARS-CoV-2 inhibitors, and could further be combined with the experimental investigations to develop effective therapeutics to deal with the present pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biological Products/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Bacteria/metabolism , Biological Products/pharmacokinetics , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cyclopentanes/pharmacokinetics , Cyclopentanes/pharmacology , Fungi/metabolism , Humans , Intestinal Absorption , Lactones/pharmacokinetics , Lactones/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Oxylipins/pharmacokinetics , Oxylipins/pharmacology , Phytochemicals/pharmacokinetics , Plants/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2
7.
CNS Neurosci Ther ; 27(1): 36-47, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388231

ABSTRACT

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important physiological barrier that separates the central nervous system (CNS) from the peripheral circulation, which contains inflammatory mediators and immune cells. The BBB regulates cellular and molecular exchange between the blood vessels and brain parenchyma. Normal functioning of the BBB is crucial for the homeostasis and proper function of the brain. It has been demonstrated that peripheral inflammation can disrupt the BBB by various pathways, resulting in different CNS diseases. Recently, clinical research also showed CNS complications following SARS-CoV-2 infection and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy, which both lead to a cytokine storm in the circulation. Therefore, elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the BBB disruption induced by peripheral inflammation will provide an important basis for protecting the CNS in the context of exacerbated peripheral inflammatory diseases. In the present review, we first summarize the physiological properties of the BBB that makes the CNS an immune-privileged organ. We then discuss the relevance of peripheral inflammation-induced BBB disruption to various CNS diseases. Finally, we elaborate various factors and mechanisms of peripheral inflammation that disrupt the BBB.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/immunology , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation Mediators/immunology
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288898

ABSTRACT

2020 and 2021 have been unprecedented years due to the rapid spread of the modified severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus around the world. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes atypical infiltrated pneumonia with many neurological symptoms, and major sleep changes. The exposure of people to stress, such as social confinement and changes in daily routines, is accompanied by various sleep disturbances, known as 'coronasomnia' phenomenon. Sleep disorders induce neuroinflammation, which promotes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and entry of antigens and inflammatory factors into the brain. Here, we review findings and trends in sleep research in 2020-2021, demonstrating how COVID-19 and sleep disorders can induce BBB leakage via neuroinflammation, which might contribute to the 'coronasomnia' phenomenon. The new studies suggest that the control of sleep hygiene and quality should be incorporated into the rehabilitation of COVID-19 patients. We also discuss perspective strategies for the prevention of COVID-19-related BBB disorders. We demonstrate that sleep might be a novel biomarker of BBB leakage, and the analysis of sleep EEG patterns can be a breakthrough non-invasive technology for diagnosis of the COVID-19-caused BBB disruption.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Sleep Wake Disorders/pathology , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19/virology , Circadian Rhythm , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sleep Wake Disorders/metabolism
10.
Immunity ; 54(7): 1594-1610.e11, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281436

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 can cause severe neurological symptoms, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear. Here, we interrogated the brain stems and olfactory bulbs in postmortem patients who had COVID-19 using imaging mass cytometry to understand the local immune response at a spatially resolved, high-dimensional, single-cell level and compared their immune map to non-COVID respiratory failure, multiple sclerosis, and control patients. We observed substantial immune activation in the central nervous system with pronounced neuropathology (astrocytosis, axonal damage, and blood-brain-barrier leakage) and detected viral antigen in ACE2-receptor-positive cells enriched in the vascular compartment. Microglial nodules and the perivascular compartment represented COVID-19-specific, microanatomic-immune niches with context-specific cellular interactions enriched for activated CD8+ T cells. Altered brain T-cell-microglial interactions were linked to clinical measures of systemic inflammation and disturbed hemostasis. This study identifies profound neuroinflammation with activation of innate and adaptive immune cells as correlates of COVID-19 neuropathology, with implications for potential therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Brain/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Microglia/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/metabolism , Brain/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Communication , Central Nervous System/immunology , Central Nervous System/metabolism , Central Nervous System/pathology , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Proteins/metabolism , Inflammation , Lymphocyte Activation , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/pathology , Olfactory Bulb/immunology , Olfactory Bulb/metabolism , Olfactory Bulb/pathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/immunology , Respiratory Insufficiency/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism
11.
Bioconjug Chem ; 32(6): 1067-1077, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241779

ABSTRACT

Passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to treat neurological conditions is one of the main hurdles in modern medicine. Many drugs with promising in vitro profiles become ineffective in vivo due to BBB restrictive permeability. In particular, this includes drugs such as antiviral porphyrins, with the ability to fight brain-resident viruses causing diseases such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). In the last two decades, BBB shuttles, particularly peptide-based ones, have shown promise in carrying various payloads across the BBB. Thus, peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs) formed by covalent attachment of a BBB peptide shuttle and an antiviral drug may become key therapeutic tools in treating neurological disorders of viral origin. In this study, we have used various approaches (guanidinium, phosphonium, and carbodiimide-based couplings) for on-resin synthesis of new peptide-porphyrin conjugates (PPCs) with BBB-crossing and potential antiviral activity. After careful fine-tuning of the synthetic chemistry, DIC/oxyma has emerged as a preferred method, by which 14 different PPCs have been made and satisfactorily characterized. The PPCs are prepared by coupling a porphyrin carboxyl group to an amino group (either N-terminal or a Lys side chain) of the peptide shuttle and show effective in vitro BBB translocation ability, low cytotoxicity toward mouse brain endothelial cells, and low hemolytic activity. Three of the PPCs, MP-P5, P4-MP, and P4-L-MP, effectively inhibiting HIV infectivity in vitro, stand out as most promising. Their efficacy against other brain-targeting viruses (Dengue, Zika, and SARS-CoV-2) is currently under evaluation, with preliminary results confirming that PPCs are a promising strategy to treat viral brain infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacokinetics , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Peptides/pharmacokinetics , Porphyrins/pharmacokinetics , Animals , Anti-HIV Agents/chemistry , Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacology , Biological Transport , Cell Line , Drug Discovery , HEK293 Cells , HIV/drug effects , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Mice , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , Porphyrins/chemistry , Porphyrins/pharmacology
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 665300, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226978

ABSTRACT

The irruption of SARS-CoV-2 during 2020 has been of pandemic proportions due to its rapid spread and virulence. COVID-19 patients experience respiratory, digestive and neurological symptoms. Distinctive symptom as anosmia, suggests a potential neurotropism of this virus. Amongst the several pathways of entry to the nervous system, we propose an alternative pathway from the infection of the gut, involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), zonulin, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) and zonulin brain receptor. Possible use of zonulin antagonists could be investigated to attenuate neurological manifestations caused by SARS-CoV-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Haptoglobins/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Protein Precursors/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , Brain/metabolism , Brain/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Diseases/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
13.
Inflammopharmacology ; 29(4): 939-963, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169006

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) first discovered in Wuhan, Hubei province, China in December 2019. SARS-CoV-2 has infected several millions of people, resulting in a huge socioeconomic cost and over 2.5 million deaths worldwide. Though the pathogenesis of COVID-19 is not fully understood, data have consistently shown that SARS-CoV-2 mainly affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Nevertheless, accumulating evidence has implicated the central nervous system in the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Unfortunately, however, the mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 induced impairment of the central nervous system are not completely known. Here, we review the literature on possible neuropathogenic mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 induced cerebral damage. The results suggest that downregulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) with increased activity of the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and cathepsin L in SARS-CoV-2 neuroinvasion may result in upregulation of proinflammatory mediators and reactive species that trigger neuroinflammatory response and blood brain barrier disruption. Furthermore, dysregulation of hormone and neurotransmitter signalling may constitute a fundamental mechanism involved in the neuropathogenic sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The viral RNA or antigenic peptides also activate or interact with molecular signalling pathways mediated by pattern recognition receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), nuclear factor kappa B, Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, complement cascades, and cell suicide molecules. Potential molecular targets and therapeutics of SARS-CoV-2 induced neurologic damage are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/immunology , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/physiology
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(5)2021 Mar 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1134166

ABSTRACT

Emerging data indicate that neurological complications occur as a consequence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical interface that regulates entry of circulating molecules into the CNS, and is regulated by signals that arise from the brain and blood compartments. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which SARS-CoV-2 interactions with the BBB may contribute to neurological dysfunction associated with coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by SARS-CoV-2. We consider aspects of peripheral disease, such as hypoxia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome/cytokine storm, as well as CNS infection and mechanisms of viral entry into the brain. We also discuss the contribution of risk factors for developing severe COVID-19 to BBB dysfunction that could increase viral entry or otherwise damage the brain.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/physiopathology , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Comorbidity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Tropism
15.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 7(6)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105773

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the pathophysiologic mechanism of encephalopathy and prolonged comatose or stuporous state in severally ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Eight COVID-19 patients with signs of encephalopathy were tested for antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the serum and CSF using a Food and Drug Administration-approved and independently validated ELISA. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and immunoglobulin G (IgG) intrathecal synthesis were further tested using albumin and IgG indices. The CSF was also tested for autoimmune encephalitis antibodies and 14-3-3, a marker of ongoing neurodegeneration. RESULTS: All patients had anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in their CSF, and 4 of 8 patients had high titers, comparable to high serum values. One patient had anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG intrathecal synthesis, and 3 others had disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The CSF in 4 patients was positive for 14-3-3-protein suggesting ongoing neurodegeneration. In all patients, the CSF was negative for autoimmune encephalitis antibodies and SARS-CoV-2 by PCR. None of the patients, apart from persistent encephalopathic signs, had any focal neurologic signs or history or specific neurologic disease. CONCLUSIONS: High-titer anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were detected in the CSF of comatose or encephalopathic patients demonstrating intrathecal IgG synthesis or BBB disruption. A disrupted BBB may facilitate the entry of cytokines and inflammatory mediators into the CNS enhancing neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. The observations highlight the need for prospective CSF studies to determine the pathogenic role of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and identify early therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/cerebrospinal fluid , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Coma/cerebrospinal fluid , Coronavirus Infections/cerebrospinal fluid , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Pneumonia, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Stupor/cerebrospinal fluid , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19 , Coma/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stupor/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome
16.
Biochimie ; 184: 95-103, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101114

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19 have infected till day 82,579,768 confirmed cases including 1,818,849 deaths, reported by World Health Organization WHO. COVID-19, originated by Severe Acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), contributes to respiratory distress in addition to neurological symptoms in some patients. In the current review, we focused on the neurological complications associated with COVID-19. We discussed different pathways followed by RNA-virus, especially Flaviviridae family in the brain and passage through the Blood-Brain-Barrier BBB. Then, we explored SARS-CoV-2 mechanisms responsible of neuroinvasion and BBB disruption as well as the immunopathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 in the central nervous system CNS. Since SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus, enclosed in a lipid bilayer and that lipids are essential cell components playing numerous biological roles in viral infection and replication, we investigated the lipid metabolism remodeling upon coronavirus replication. We also highlighted the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective potential of an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid DHA, as well as several bioactive lipid mediators. Altogether, our data allow better understanding of SARS-CoV-2 neuroinvasion and could assist in drug targeting to decline the burden of short-term and long-term neurological manifestations of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19/complications , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Docosahexaenoic Acids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Central Nervous System Diseases/metabolism , Docosahexaenoic Acids/therapeutic use , Flaviviridae/metabolism , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Neuroprotective Agents/metabolism , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use
17.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 25(3): 19, 2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100995

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an updated discussion on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and radiographic features, mechanisms, associations and epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Headache is common in PRES, though headache associated with PRES was not identified as a separate entity in the 2018 International Classification of Headache Disorders. Here, we review the relevant literature and suggest criteria for consideration of its inclusion. RECENT FINDINGS: COVID-19 has been identified as a potential risk factor for PRES, with a prevalence of 1-4% in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection undergoing neuroimaging, thus making a discussion of its identification and treatment particularly timely given the ongoing global pandemic at the time of this writing. PRES is a neuro-clinical syndrome with specific imaging findings. The clinical manifestations of PRES include headache, seizures, encephalopathy, visual disturbances, and focal neurologic deficits. Associations with PRES include renal failure, preeclampsia and eclampsia, autoimmune conditions, and immunosuppression. PRES is theorized to be a syndrome of disordered autoregulation and endothelial dysfunction resulting in preferential hyperperfusion of the posterior circulation. Treatment typically focuses on treating the underlying cause and removal of the offending agents.


Subject(s)
Endothelium/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/physiopathology , Seizures/physiopathology , Vision Disorders/physiopathology , Acute Chest Syndrome/epidemiology , Aminolevulinic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Anemia, Sickle Cell/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain Edema/diagnostic imaging , Brain Edema/physiopathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Circulation/physiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Eclampsia/epidemiology , Female , Homeostasis/physiology , Humans , Hypertension/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/epidemiology , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/therapy , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Prognosis , Renal Insufficiency/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vasospasm, Intracranial/physiopathology
18.
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab ; 41(6): 1179-1192, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061015

ABSTRACT

Cerebrovascular events have emerged as a central feature of the clinical syndrome associated with Sars-CoV-2 infection. This increase in infection-related strokes is marked by atypical presentations including stroke in younger patients and a high rate of hemorrhagic transformation after ischemia. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may underlie this connection. Efforts to identify synergism in the pathophysiology underlying stroke and Sars-CoV-2 infection can inform the understanding of both conditions in novel ways. In this review, the molecular cascades connected to Sars-CoV-2 infection are placed in the context of the cerebral vasculature and in relationship to pathways known to be associated with stroke. Cytokine-mediated promotion of systemic hypercoagulability is suggested while direct Sars-CoV-2 infection of cerebral endothelial cells may also contribute. Endotheliopathy resulting from direct Sars-CoV-2 infection of the cerebral vasculature can modulate ACE2/AT1R/MasR signaling pathways, trigger direct viral activation of the complement cascade, and activate feed-forward cytokine cascades that impact the blood-brain barrier. All of these pathways are already implicated as independent mechanisms driving stroke and cerebrovascular injury irrespective of Sars-CoV-2. Recognizing the overlap of molecular pathways triggered by Sars-CoV-2 infection with those implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke provides an opportunity to identify future therapeutics targeting both Sars-CoV-2 and stroke thereby reducing the impact of the global pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Stroke/etiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/metabolism , Complement Activation , Humans , Renin-Angiotensin System , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Stroke/metabolism , Virus Internalization
19.
Neurology ; 96(2): e294-e300, 2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028474

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore whether hospitalized patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and neurologic symptoms have evidence of CNS infection, inflammation, and injury using CSF biomarker measurements. METHODS: We assessed CSF SARS-CoV-2 RNA along with CSF biomarkers of intrathecal inflammation (CSF white blood cell count, neopterin, ß2-microglobulin, and immunoglobulin G index), blood-brain barrier integrity (albumin ratio), and axonal injury (CSF neurofilament light chain protein [NfL]) in 6 patients with moderate to severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and neurologic symptoms who had undergone a diagnostic lumbar puncture. Neurologic symptoms and signs included features of encephalopathies (4 of 6), suspected meningitis (1 of 6), and dysgeusia (1 of 6). SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of nasopharyngeal swabs. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in the plasma of 2 patients (cycle threshold [Ct] value 35.0-37.0) and in CSF at low levels (Ct 37.2, 38.0, 39.0) in 3 patients in 1 but not in a second real-time PCR assay. CSF neopterin (median 43.0 nmol/L) and ß2-microglobulin (median 3.1 mg/L) were increased in all. Median immunoglobulin G index (0.39), albumin ratio (5.35), and CSF white blood cell count (<3 cells/µL) were normal in all, while CSF NfL was elevated in 2 patients. CONCLUSION: Our results in patients with COVID-19 and neurologic symptoms suggest an unusual pattern of marked CSF inflammation in which soluble markers were increased but white cell response and other immunologic features typical of CNS viral infections were absent. While our initial hypothesis centered on CNS SARS-CoV-2 invasion, we could not convincingly detect SARS-CoV-2 as the underlying driver of CNS inflammation. These features distinguish COVID-19 CSF from other viral CNS infections and raise fundamental questions about the CNS pathobiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , Blood-Brain Barrier/diagnostic imaging , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging
20.
CNS Neurosci Ther ; 27(1): 36-47, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003961

ABSTRACT

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important physiological barrier that separates the central nervous system (CNS) from the peripheral circulation, which contains inflammatory mediators and immune cells. The BBB regulates cellular and molecular exchange between the blood vessels and brain parenchyma. Normal functioning of the BBB is crucial for the homeostasis and proper function of the brain. It has been demonstrated that peripheral inflammation can disrupt the BBB by various pathways, resulting in different CNS diseases. Recently, clinical research also showed CNS complications following SARS-CoV-2 infection and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy, which both lead to a cytokine storm in the circulation. Therefore, elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the BBB disruption induced by peripheral inflammation will provide an important basis for protecting the CNS in the context of exacerbated peripheral inflammatory diseases. In the present review, we first summarize the physiological properties of the BBB that makes the CNS an immune-privileged organ. We then discuss the relevance of peripheral inflammation-induced BBB disruption to various CNS diseases. Finally, we elaborate various factors and mechanisms of peripheral inflammation that disrupt the BBB.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/immunology , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation Mediators/immunology
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