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1.
Indian J Pharmacol ; 53(6): 499-510, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603884

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Till now, no meta-analysis is available to address the clinical profile, risk factors, different interventions, and outcomes among COVID-19-associated rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis (C-ROCM) cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight literature databases were screened using appropriate keywords from November 1, 2019, to June 30, 2021. The objectives were to analyze the clinical and microbiological profile, risk factor/comorbidity, intervention, and outcome. "R-metafor package" was used for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 23 studies were included. The mean age of presentation of C-ROCM was 54.6 years. The most common presentation was ptosis (72.7%), lid edema (60.6%), proptosis (60.6%), ophthalmoplegia (57.3%), loss of vision (53.7%), facial edema (34.7%), and nasal-blockage (11.8%). Evidence of intracranial spread was seen in 42.8% of cases. Rhizopus was the most common fungus (57.1%) isolated in fungal culture. Among C-ROCM patients, diabetes was the commonest comorbid condition, and the use of corticosteroids related to COVID-19 treatment was the most common risk factor (85.75%). Compared to controlled diabetics, C-ROCM was significantly higher among uncontrolled diabetics (odds ratio [OR] 0.15, 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 0.041-0.544, P = 0.0010). However, no significant association was seen between C-ROCM and COVID-19 severity (OR 0.930, 95% C.I. 0.212-4.087, P = 0.923). For treatment, amphotericin-B was the most common antifungal drug used which was followed by surgical options. However, mortality was high (prevalence 0.344, 95% C.I. 0.205-0.403) despite treatment. CONCLUSION: Although local rhino-orbito symptoms were the first to appear, rapid intracranial extension was seen in a significant number of C-ROCM cases. Uncontrolled diabetes and excessive use of corticosteroid were the most common risk factors present among the C-ROCM cases. High index clinical suspicion is imperative (specifically among COVID-19 patients with diabetes), and routine screening may be helpful.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/complications , COVID-19/complications , Mucormycosis/complications , Nose Diseases/complications , Orbital Diseases/complications , Amphotericin B/therapeutic use , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Nose Diseases/drug therapy , Orbital Diseases/drug therapy , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
S Afr Med J ; 111(11): 1050-1054, 2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538769

ABSTRACT

A previously healthy 10-year-old girl, living in a sheep-farming community in South Africa with exposure to dogs, presented to her local hospital with generalised tonic-clonic seizures. The initial clinical assessment and laboratory work-up were unremarkable. When she presented with further seizures 6 months later, attempts to arrange neuroimaging and specialist assessment were unsuccessful owing to restrictions on routine healthcare services during the SARS-CoV-2 nationwide lockdown. Subsequently, 11 months after her first presentation, she developed focal neurological signs suggestive of raised intracranial pressure. A brain computed tomography scan revealed a left-sided cerebral cyst and imminent tonsillar herniation. An emergency burr-hole procedure was performed to relieve the raised intracranial pressure, followed by definitive neurosurgical excision of cysts. Hydatid protoscolices and hooklets were seen on microscopy of cyst fluid, and treatment with albendazole and praziquantel was initiated. While her infection was treated successfully, long-term sequelae including permanent blindness and hemiparesis could potentially have been prevented with early neuroimaging and surgical intervention.


Subject(s)
Anticestodal Agents/administration & dosage , Brain Diseases/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Echinococcosis/diagnosis , Albendazole/administration & dosage , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/parasitology , Child , Delayed Diagnosis , Echinococcosis/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hypertension/parasitology , Praziquantel/administration & dosage , Seizures/parasitology , South Africa , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
3.
J Neuroimmunol ; 358: 577661, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307055

ABSTRACT

We describe the first case of hyperacute reversible encephalopathy following COVID-19 vaccination. A patient presented with acute onset encephalopathy, mainly characterized by agitation and confusion, rapidly responsive to high dosage steroid therapy and complete remission within 3 days from onset. The clinical manifestation was related with systemic and CSF cytokine hyperproduction, responsive to steroid therapy. Although the occurrence of encephalopathy after vaccination may be just a casual temporal association, we speculate that the cytokine-storm could be the result of an excessive innate immune response against the vaccine, in a predisposed patient susceptible to autoimmunity.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/chemically induced , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cytokine Release Syndrome/chemically induced , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Acute Disease , Aged , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Prednisone/administration & dosage
4.
Mol Psychiatry ; 26(4): 1044-1059, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983662

ABSTRACT

Scientists and health professionals are exhaustively trying to contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic by elucidating viral invasion mechanisms, possible drugs to prevent viral infection/replication, and health cares to minimize individual exposure. Although neurological symptoms are being reported worldwide, neural acute and long-term consequences of SARS-CoV-2 are still unknown. COVID-19 complications are associated with exacerbated immunoinflammatory responses to SARS-CoV-2 invasion. In this scenario, pro-inflammatory factors are intensely released into the bloodstream, causing the so-called "cytokine storm". Both pro-inflammatory factors and viruses may cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the central nervous system, activating neuroinflammatory responses accompanied by hemorrhagic lesions and neuronal impairment, which are largely described processes in psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, SARS-CoV-2 infection could trigger and/or worse brain diseases. Moreover, patients with central nervous system disorders associated to neuroimmune activation (e.g. depression, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease) may present increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or achieve severe conditions. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection may trigger hyperactivation of P2X7 receptors leading to NLRP3 inflammasome stimulation as a key mediator of neuroinvasion and consequent neuroinflammatory processes, as observed in psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. In this context, P2X7 receptor antagonism could be a promising strategy to prevent or treat neurological complications in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/complications , Brain Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Neuroimmunomodulation , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Inflammasomes/immunology , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
6.
Brain Dev ; 43(2): 230-233, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856505

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reversible splenial lesion syndrome (RESLES) is characterized by a temporary lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum, emerging related to encephalitis, seizures, antiepileptic drug withdrawal, or metabolic disturbances. Among RESLES, mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion (MERS) has been defined as a distinct clinicoradiologic syndrome associated with viral infections. CASE PRESENTATION: We report two children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome-children related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) who developed RESLES during the disease course. Encephalopathy was the main central nervous system symptom. Both of the children showed a rapid recovery, and brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed complete resolution of the splenial lesion within 1 week. CONCLUSION: The complete resolution of the splenial lesion and rapid recovery from encephalopathy in RESLES associated with SARS CoV-2 were similar to observed in MERS.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnosis , Corpus Callosum/diagnostic imaging , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Electroencephalography , Exanthema/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hallucinations/physiopathology , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Neurocognitive Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Neurocognitive Disorders/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Tachypnea/physiopathology
7.
J Neurol ; 268(8): 2671-2675, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841658

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report on efficacy and safety of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy in a case series of patients with COVID-19-related encephalopathy. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data on all patients with COVID-19 hospitalized at two Italian hospitals who developed encephalopathy during disease course and were treated with IVIg. RESULTS: Five patients (two females, mean age 66.8 years) developed encephalopathy after a mean of 12.6 days, since the onset of respiratory/constitutional symptoms related to COVID-19. Four patients suffered severe respiratory distress, three of which required invasive mechanical ventilation. Neurological manifestations included impaired consciousness, agitation, delirium, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs. EEG demonstrated diffuse slowing in all patients. Brain MRI showed non-specific findings. CSF analysis revealed normal cell count and protein levels. In all subjects, RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 in CSF tested negative. IVIg at 0.4 g/kg/die was commenced 29.8 days (mean, range: 19-55 days) after encephalopathy onset, leading to complete electroclinical recovery in all patients, with an initial improvement of neuropsychiatric symptoms observed in 3.4 days (mean, range: 1-10 days). No adverse events related to IVIg were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings suggest that IVIg may represent a safe and effective treatment for COVID-19-associated encephalopathy. Clinical efficacy may be driven by the anti-inflammatory action of IVIg, associated with its anti-cytokine qualities.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Aged , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Neuroimmunol ; 349: 577400, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792960

ABSTRACT

Encephalopathy is emerging as a recurrent complication of COVID-19 yet remains poorly characterized. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with COVID-19-related encephalopathy presenting as expressive aphasia and inattentiveness, subsequently progressing to agitation and marked confusion. Brain MRI and CSF analysis were unremarkable, while EEG showed slowing with frontal sharp waves. Neuropsychiatric symptoms resolved following treatment with tocilizumab. CNS involvement in COVID-19 may present as a subacute encephalopathy characterized by prominent frontal lobe dysfunction, with language disturbances as first neurological manifestation. Future studies should further investigate the role of tocilizumab in treating COVID-19-related encephalopathy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Aphasia/etiology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
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